Squats = increased Testosterone. True or False.

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by KnightTemplar, Oct 23, 2010.

  1. KnightTemplar

    KnightTemplar Ebony Belt Platinum Member

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    I've read that regular free weights training, especially focusing on big, compound lifts, increases one's testosterone. But are Squats better than Bench, Deadlifts etc or just the same?
     
  2. Justice 4 All

    Justice 4 All Brown Belt

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    I heard/read squats produce a high quantity of HGH.
     
  3. KnightTemplar

    KnightTemplar Ebony Belt Platinum Member

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    Same here. I was interested in reading the opinions of Sherdog's more advanced Lifters on the subject.

    PS: Love the avatar. Always good to meet a fellow Geek!:icon_chee
     
  4. PCP

    PCP Guest

    No this is mostly bullshit. Hormone levels are only elevated for a very brief period of time after exercise after which they return to normal. It is an inconsequential side effect.
     
  5. InFunkWeTrust

    InFunkWeTrust Banned Banned

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    Hey TS, I just noticed you're the guy w/ the broken foot thread. Man, I was bummed out when i broke my shit. I had just started Rippetoe two months earlier and was making serious gains. No doubt, squats and dead's can change your entire body type. They are hands down the two best lifts for overall strength, imho. I've watched Rip's youtube vids plenty of times to really help me focus on form. Anyhow, squats are king and should be hailed as such. good luck recovering.
     
  6. Steakeater**

    Steakeater** Banned Banned

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    True but irrelavent
     
  7. KnightTemplar

    KnightTemplar Ebony Belt Platinum Member

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    Thanks, man. Hope I'm back into heavy lifting before too long.
     
  8. Justice 4 All

    Justice 4 All Brown Belt

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    I fractured my toe and bruised my ankle falling down some stairs. Luckily it didn't interfere with my lifting :D.

    It shouldn't take too long for your foot to have sufficiently healed for lifting. But be careful.
     
  9. KnightTemplar

    KnightTemplar Ebony Belt Platinum Member

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    I intend to be. Taking it easy sucks, but it's a lot better than the alternative.
     
  10. gspieler

    gspieler Red Belt

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    more muscles used and more weight lifted= more testosterone production, hence more during squat and deadlift than bench.
     
  11. Big H

    Big H Blue Belt

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    they deffo help full body muscle growth, keith wassung-

     
  12. Ghost Ape

    Ghost Ape Yellow Belt

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    The second part of the bolded text is true. However the first part seems a little misleading. Sure testosterone levels may increase a little bit after squatting or deadlifting heavy, but that doesn't mean it stays at an elevated level for a long enough time to make any noticeable difference on the body.
     
  13. zhangmaster12

    zhangmaster12 Blue Belt

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    Acute testosterone and cortisol responses to high ... [Fiziol Cheloveka. 2010 Jul-Aug] - PubMed result

    No changes were observed for either Cort or the Tes/Cort ratio. HLa significantly increased post-exercise (mmol x L-1 ; pre = 1.00 +/- 0.09, post = 4.85 +/- 1.10). The exercise protocol resulted in no significant changes in Tes, Cort or the Tes/Cort ratio, although the Cohen's D value indicates a very large effect size for the Tes response. The acute increase for Tes is in agreement with previous reports that high power activities can elicit a Tes response. High power resistance exercise protocols such as the one used in the present study produce acute increases of Tes. These results indicate that high power resistance exercise can contribute to an anabolic hormonal response with this type of training, and may partially explain the muscle hypertrophy observed in athletes who routinely employ high power resistance exercise.

    Found this study, make what you want of it.
     
  14. Endeavor

    Endeavor White Belt

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    Walking moderately for 30 minutes has also been shown to cause a spike in hormone levels. But that spike, just like the spike caused by heavy compound lifts, is inconsequential.

    The benefits of heavy compound lifts on the entire body comes from their ability to engage many muscle groups at the same time and their ability to challenge the CNS, not from the hormone spike that they cause.
     
  15. turbozed

    turbozed Red Belt

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    I think there was a long discussion about this a few months back. There was one study done that showed only acute hormone response that later subsided. However, squats weren't even involved in this study. They did like 10 leg extensions or something like that.

    The study that was just posted in this thread actually used squats, so it would be more relevant. Still, it contains baffling lines like this:
    Given the sparse and inconclusive research on this subject, I wouldn't say that the testosterone effect has been proven to work (at least in the way that most sports trainers argue it does). For the same reasons, though, there's not enough evidence to conclude with any certainty that it's bullshit either.

    So the answer to TS's question is: maybe true. The more important question is how much.
     
  16. pliftkl

    pliftkl Green Belt

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    Watching porn elevates testosterone, and requires less recovery time than squats.

    I don't know if squats elevate testosterone or not, but they make me big and strong.
     
  17. Chest Rockwell

    Chest Rockwell Brown Belt

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    pretty much sums it up. Do you simply want 'higher test levels' or do you want
    to have 'more muscle, strenght, and power?'
    If you answer the latter then squats are your best friend
     
  18. BayAreaGuy

    BayAreaGuy Good Day

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    Question for the people who think it does:


    Does doing heavy squats for 10 reps boost your T-levels more than doing moderate weights for 20 reps?
     
  19. Tosa

    Tosa Red Belt

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    I'd say that for practical purposes not knowing enough about whether there's enough of a tesoterone elevation to benefit, or how one would train to maximize this benefit is the same thing as there being no benefit...as I'm going to be squatting regardless.

    ...So the answer to getting stronger is squats and porn. But seriously, do you have a link to a study or article on this? I'm interested on knowing more of the specifics.
     
  20. PCP

    PCP Guest

    No, they basically compared guys who were doing a high volume of leg extensions and single limb movements to guys doing squats and other heavy compound movements in addition to the single limb movements. The idea was that one group would elicit a high hormonal response from their training and the other group would have little to no hormonal response, and they would measure the difference in hypertrophy in specific limbs. They measured the muscle tissue that was worked (ex:the quadriceps) and noticed no real difference between the two groups. The conclusion was that the acute, brief release of hormones as a response to training was inconsequential in terms of overall hypertrophy and strength gains.

    This was a valid study that dispels a lot of the bullshit myths you read on the internet about squatting to raise your testosterone.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 24, 2010

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