sparring

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by snowolf17, Aug 28, 2010.

  1. snowolf17

    snowolf17 Yellow Belt

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    so i just took up muay thai about a month and a half ago and was wondering how long people usually train before they do full contact sparring? i usually try two or three times a week.
     
  2. xilliun

    xilliun Brown Belt

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    when the trainer decides you're ready to do full sparring
     
  3. chaospfa

    chaospfa Blue Belt

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    Usualy about 3-6 months. It also depends on your instructor, some of the more respected Thai's don't allow full contact sparring unless you are preparing for a fight, Kru Khun Kao Charuad comes to mind as an example.
     
  4. c0r1nth14n

    c0r1nth14n Blue Belt

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    I was doing very light sparring pretty soon after I started. We usually do either light sparring or light combination drills (on a partner) every class. As I get better I gradually go harder. I'm pretty much the only beginner at my gym though, so other places might be pretty different. Anyway, under this system I suppose the idea is I eventually work my way up to full sparring when my coach and I think I'm ready for it.
     
  5. lucid

    lucid FTW-champ!

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    depends on your coach and actually depends on your club mates. Reading some of the experiences at this place im actually shocked people stay there.

    You want to go in and put it to the test, but have guys who will ease up once your in the deep end. I hear stories of guys getting slaughtered in sparring. Which i think is retarded. The important thing starting out is staying safe and getting better. It better to be babied 3-6 months in and being a killer a year out, then being thrown to the wolves and quit and golfing a year later.

    Forget your pride... start light. Get a feel of your range and your gas tank and slowly build up.
     
  6. Centaur

    Centaur Black Belt

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    Usually after about 2-3 months I'll let guys (and girls) start to spar, but it's situational. First few times they "spar" it's just jab round.

    45 seconds one guy jabs, the other guy defends.
    Then vice versa.
    Then the last 30 seconds they can both jab.

    I find it helps ease them into sparring this way. They can focus on one thing at a time either attacking or defending (plus footwork, which is obviously very important). I can also tell how they handle pressure this way. Also, since it's just the jab, there's very little chance of anyone getting hurt their first few times and turning them off from sparring.

    Some guys might do this for weeks, other guys are fine and I'll add a bit more each session. Maybe just jab and cross. Or just KK Sparring (body punches shots only), etc.

    It seems to be working pretty well and the students get a chance to apply the techniques they've learned in a real situation much sooner then waiting 6 months or so. This way they can really see how everything works right off the bat and take the technique/pad drills more seriously.
     
  7. Armycombative

    Armycombative White Belt

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    I don't see a problem with letting people spar right away. I like the total immersion technique. I wouldn't put a novice with a novice though. I would put a more experienced fighter with a novice and let them know to take it easy on the nub.
     
  8. lord_kader

    lord_kader Green Belt

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    this is what i think. i completely disagree with letting a beginner go hard his first few times ESPECIALLY against another beginner b/c neither of them have control yet.

    but, i think having shots thrown at you from somebody more experienced that knows how to hold back, tell you what you are doing wrong, and being able to try and apply your techniques makes for a smarter fighter and not somebody that just tries to go in and plan out set combinations of attack not regarding openings. i have seen happen before when somebody trains mostly/just on pads/bags and its just awful. it wastes energy and leaves yourself open to your opponent all day...

    HOWEVER, although too much pad work can be bad too much sparringcan be just as bad. if you have them spar too soon without learning how to properly throw the techniques they are trying to use they can get sloppy.

    ^ this is where i agree with centaur where he said he starts people off just throwing jabs and then adding in weapons little by little. i have a few people i train in stand up and i will start off by teaching them jabs, crosses, and front kicks and then we do light contact just jabs and then when they start getting the hang of that we move on to more and more until they are ready enough to go against all sorts of attacks
     
  9. Armycombative

    Armycombative White Belt

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    Sensible enough. I also work under that mentality of breaking someone off early to find out if they have the heart to stick with it or not. To me it's easier to find out early on than later when you've invested a lot of time and effort into someone.

    Don't get me wrong I will work with anyone and I truly believe that everyone can be taught the warrior spirit. That's just how I roll.
     

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