SOLO Camping-Backpacking Routine/Supplies/Gear

Discussion in 'Mayberry Lounge' started by Pure Peace, Jan 5, 2015.

  1. Pure Peace

    Pure Peace Blue Belt

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    ive gotten back into hiking the past 2 years or so
    i have a flexible schedule in the spring, summer, and half of fall, allowing me a free day or 2 during the work week to roam the woods

    ive only been cabin and beach camping when i was younger but I really want to camp out for 1 night since i get out so often

    obviously all my friends are at work during the week, so it will only be me

    for those of you experienced with solo camping, i'd like to hear your input on the basic necessities and routines i should follow

    some background info:

    i hike mainly in lower NY state (harriman park, the gunks, catskills, etc)

    i always have proper boots, clothing layers, bunch of knives, bear spray (i know, they are just black bears, but have encountered them 2 times too many), bug spray, compass & phone GPS/maps, etc

    specifically, i'm looking for info on:

    - the type of pack i should purchase ; i only have an osprey "day pack" with a 3 liter water reservoir
    -i'll fill up the 3 liters of water, but would also like to learn to use the natural water in the area; any tips on how, when to collect/sanitize the water would be greatly appreciated (i have a life straw and a 3 liter dromedary bag)
    - FIRES - i'll def bring lighters and matches with me but would like info on types of kindling

    - CRITTERS/Bears - how do i keep from getting eaten while i sleep?

    thanks bros
     
  2. Omegaboy13

    Omegaboy13 Sweepin' Your Leg

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    Been a backpacker for 10+ years with thousands of miles under the weight of a pack. With a light weight pack like that, iodine tabs would probably be best. Pump filters are great and I use one, but I've got room in the pack. In the 400+ miles I've spent on the Appalachian and many more miles on surrounding trails I never carried bear spray, now that I'm out west I do though, it's all up to you.

    Whiteblaze.net is a great resource for your area.
     
  3. Pure Peace

    Pure Peace Blue Belt

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    appreciate it

    will read the link


    re: bear spray - ive had 2 encounters with black bears here in NJ and NY......they ran away upon hearing/seeing me, but better safe than sorry, IMO.....the recent stories of a guy being killed by a black bear 15 miles away and the rise of human/bear encounters in the area made me paranoid

    also have come across an overly curious coyote that didnt seem scared of me
     
  4. superking

    superking Poet — Traveler — Soldier of Fortune

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    Cast iron pan.
    Hatchet.
    Shotgun.
     
  5. Frylock

    Frylock Brown Belt

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    did you read this?

    [​IMG]
     
  6. FistsofScotland

    FistsofScotland Blue Belt

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    I would also consider a handgun and/or rifle. ....and a good dog to keep you company
     
  7. Senzo Tanaka

    Senzo Tanaka Silver Belt

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    I'd love to get into camping but people scare me far more than animals.

    I just know I'd end up camping and end up running into some crazy hillbilly or bush person that would ruin me.
     
  8. Luger

    Luger Rabbi of Platinum Nation Banned

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    I have as a tent the coleman avior x1.
    Does not weight much and is really sturdy.

    [​IMG]
    http://www.ukcampsite.co.uk/tents/p/Coleman-Avior-X1/91

    As for most of my other gear, I have just bought here and there in some army surplus stores.

    Usually good gear for very little cost.

    Also, if you are interested in fire starting, check out the swedish army firesteel.
    http://www.amazon.com/Light-Fire-Original-Swedish-FireSteel/dp/B0013L8D9K

    Has thousands of strikes. Works in all weathers...

    Look into the DIY can stove. It is really simple to make, costs nothing, weights a few grams and works well.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Pure Peace

    Pure Peace Blue Belt

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    from what i know, the only times you can carry a gun in state parks in NY is during hunting seasons


    reason i carry my knives and bear spray too i guess

    thanks will research these
    is that tent small enough to fit in a small osprey day pack, or should i get a full sized pack?
     
  10. Thai Domi

    Thai Domi Silver Belt

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    Bring a shovel; bury your poop away from camp.
     
  11. Luger

    Luger Rabbi of Platinum Nation Banned

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    I am 6'3 and it feels a bit like a coffin, but I am not that picky. Just use it for sleeping.
    There is a little storeroom at the end - and you can go in by the side

    [​IMG]


    Edit: I forgot one brilliant thing. The keffiyeh/shemagh.
    They are really cheap and have tons of uses.

    http://survivalcache.com/shemaghs-a-survival-must-have/
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2015
  12. Light is the way to go. I'd get some trail running shoes rather than boots. They weigh about 1/3 as much and they dry out fast. Once/if your boots get wet they never dry out. I made the switch 15 years ago and never looked back.

    If you are primarily camping in the summer/early fall I'd look at a hammock instead of a tent. You are not limited to pancake flat terrain that can be hard to come by in the mountains. Tents or tarps are better if its cold though.

    Don't worry about a pack cover , just put all the shit that HAS to stay dry in a lightweight dry bag or garbage bag.

    I use drops ( Aquamira) rather than a filter these days.

    There are about a thousand little tricks that you'll figure out the more you get out there.
     
  13. johnyboy

    johnyboy Silver Belt

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    Make sure you let someone know where about a you will be
     
  14. Pure Peace

    Pure Peace Blue Belt

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    i hate mosquitos so i prefer a tent for overnight, although a nice packable hammock sounds really nice for taking naps during the day

    re: trial shoes over boots -i really like/need the ankle support of boots.....are there any waterproof/resistant boots out there?
     
  15. 2DUM2TAP

    2DUM2TAP Silver Belt

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    Depends on how luxurious you want your stay to be or how far you travel. I would skip the day pack and get the full one.

    I have a military pack. Make sure you have good waist support. Your shoulders should not be what is carrying the weight.
    Bag your stuff. Never trust that the bag is waterproof like it says. Also when you bag your stuff, you tend to capture air which will help your pack float should you ever be unfortunate enough to have it end up in a lake or river.
    Good knife. Full tang is essential. I have one with a small saw blade portion.
    Para cord.
    Bivy bag, ground sheets or small tent. I’ve also used a jungle hammock.
    For your fire, First you need Tinder, then Kindling… You can grab fire tabs to make life easy, but you should practice without it.
    For Tinder I usually go for Dry Birch Bark, Pine needles, or grass. You should have something else you carry though in case it’s all wet. I’ve used a sock before and frayed the edges. You can also make fire cloth. Kindling is small dry softwood twigs, branches.
    I would stay away from the water purification tab’s like iodine. Boil your water, make a tea. This is especially good as a hot drink can lift your spirits if it is miserable out. If not then Chlorine dioxide is the preferred method.
     
  16. 2DUM2TAP

    2DUM2TAP Silver Belt

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    The jungle hammock has a roof and mesh sides for the bugs.
     
  17. Luger

    Luger Rabbi of Platinum Nation Banned

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    I once read that the lint from the linttrap in the washing machine can be used as a good starter for fires.
    Never tried it, though.

    Found it: http://willowhavenoutdoor.com/gener...y-cant-buy-pet-balls-dryer-lint-fire-starter/
     


  18. If you pack light enough you don't need ankle support. My pack typically weighs about 17-18 pounds. That's with an old Lowe alpine pack from the early 90s that probably weighs 4-5 lbs itself. The longest trip I've done without resupply was 100 miles over 6 days and the extra food probably put me at 24 lbs. Many guys will go waaaaay lighter than this. When I first starred out I was killing myself with 40-50 lbs worth of shit.....including my heavy ass boots , then I started figuring out ways to trim it down. Check out Beyond backpacking by Ray Jardine. Some of his ideas are out there but he has a lot of good pointers as well.
    Waterproof keeps water out and it keeps sweat in. Take the insole out of a running shoe and its dry over night......a boot will take 2 days if it gets soaked and if you're out long enough you will get wet at some point. The fatigue factor is the biggest draw back IMO.....you're gonna hate those 3lb boots about 12 miles into your day.


    Plenty of hammocks are available with bug nets.....check eagle nest outfitters as they are probably the most common one around.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 5, 2015
  19. 2DUM2TAP

    2DUM2TAP Silver Belt

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    I read that before too, but forgot all about it. I should try it next time I'm out, or just lighting a fire in my back yard. I have a full little garbage can of it on top of my dryer right now....
     
  20. boomertx

    boomertx Purple Belt

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    I hear you on the trail runners. I switched to them a few years ago and have never looked back. On the other hand, I rarely overnight and just do long day hikes. It can get pretty challenging with boulder fields and the like but I've never had a problem and do many of the hikes solo on less traveled trails. I'm also never more than 10 miles from a trailhead.

    But I did have a pretty experienced backpacker tell me that if you're hiking and miles from anywhere why risk a twisted or broken ankle in lieu of a few ounces of weight. He suggested hiking boots for an extra level of ankle support and not trail runners...made sense to me and if I was hiking overnight would probably do that.
     

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