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So many BJJ injuries

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by metalgeardiesel, Sep 5, 2010.

  1. metalgeardiesel

    metalgeardiesel White Belt

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    I've been training for about 4 months now and have been in and out of training because of wrist injuries. I'm really discouraged and was wondering if I'm the only one that is experiencing this.

    I'm thinking of just weight lifting until i get stronger and then coming back when I'm stronger. Since BJJ is a combat sport, of course injuries should be expected.

    Besides getting stronger, icing your joints, stretching, and eating healthy, what are some ways to prevent injuries? I really want to continue, but at the same time I don't know if it is worth it to get injured for a month and then come back again and again. BJJ is also expensive...

    Any advice?
     
  2. Kainan

    Kainan Orange Belt

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    if you're consistently hurting your wrist you might want to see a doctor. at least, thats what i'd do. but i also don't know how severe it is or what you did to it.
     
  3. 87

    87 Yellow Belt

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    Do you post your arm when you fall to the mat? If that is the case then learn to breakfall.
     
  4. tenniswhiz

    tenniswhiz Steel Belt

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    Wrist? Really?
    Are you training gi or no-gi? How often do you train?
    Do you roll with other white belts or blues/purples? Most people would probably say that you're more likely to get hurt with other whites, blues usually won't hurt you, and purples will beat you very gently.

    You should tell your instructor and higher ranked training partners and see if they can tell you why your wrist might be getting hurt.
    Maybe you are holding on to things against your opponent's leverage consistently/persistently.
    Maybe you can try just twice a week with two days of rest in between, and then bump it up to 3x/wk if you feel like it.
    I don't think I'm one of those guys who's cut out to train 5x/wk, or twice a day, or anything like that. I also can't lift weights on the same day I trained. Not like I have time for it, but I wouldn't be able to physically do it if I did have time.
    You could also wear some kind of medical brace on each wrist, or even use a training glove that gives wrist support.

    You should feel when it gets strained when you're training too. If you're caught in a tight spot just tell your partner and start again. It's ok.

    I don't think you need to lift weights to get ready to train BJJ.

    If nothing I said applies, then do what the other guy said, see a doctor. You might have some old injury that only gets aggravated under the stress of training or some other condition.

    Good luck.
     
    Mr.Maelstrom likes this.
  5. DaRuckus337

    DaRuckus337 Black Belt

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    One of the keys to getting injured less is simply getting more experience. Knowing how and where to move your own body reduces awkward positions and the injuries that result from them. Understanding where and how your opponent is likely to move reduces injuries. Getting in better grappling shape and the simple process of acclimating your body to the new types of stresses you are putting on it reduces injuries. Of course, getting experience takes time and getting injured in the interim only makes this process take more time, but in the end, it's really the best way to reduce injuries because you're also getting better at grappling in the process. Stick with the sport - I would definitely not recommend taking a significant amount of time off to 'lift' yourself into shape as a way of staying healthier. Take time off and do rehab exercises as needed to let your body heal, but weightroom time at the expense of mat time is not a great strategy imo.
     
  6. KaosX

    KaosX Banned Banned

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    The inside of my thighs hurt like hell after my first day of BJJ. We were going over guard passing and I kept getting boney elbows into my thighs/knees.

    The next day I barely got out of bed and found it to be hellish to walk up and down stairs. I haven't that the problem since but I sure as hell would have a doc look at anything if I keep getting injured. If you have health insurance it's more than worth it.

    If not I'd ask my instructor to watch over me during a rolling session with who I roll with the most and give me pointers.
     
  7. The Apostle

    The Apostle Green Belt

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    I was feeling your pain until this statement. This makes it sound as though you just haven't gotten used to the normal pain associated with BJJ, or grappling in general.

    The inside of your thighs will "callous up," and soon you won't even notice the elbows while clearing them from your thighs.

    Like someone mentioned above, soon you will recognize ahead of time awkward positions approaching and make changes to avoid painful pozeesh.

    It basically sounds as though your body just isn't used to it, give it time if you can. You will harden.

    What were you doing with yourself prior to grappling to remain in shape?


    Edit: sorry I confused the TS with another poster, the poster I replied to. So never mind.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2010
  8. billzar

    billzar Yellow Belt

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    I had a lot of injuries/aches my first several months of grappling--shoulders, neck, knees, fingers, and lots of bruises. It really sucked and I often questioned if grappling was worth it. Now, really not many injuries at all. Even the bruises weirdly have dramatically decreased. My fingers do hurt from practicing open guard all the time, but even those are not hurting as much as they used to.

    Just stick with it; I think it's a completely normal process you're going through and it will get easier. And it is so worth it. Do not waste your time and take a few months off to weight train. You will regret it.

    Of course, I'm not really sure if you have a real injury (sprain, torn ligaments, etc.)... that would be a different story.
     
  9. [Tycho?]

    [Tycho?] Brown Belt

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    I hurt my wrist by not tapping to a wrist lock. Its a pretty minor pain, but when I put weight on my hand in a certain way it hurts. Hasn't caused me to stop training, but it leaves me vulnerable to injure it more.
     
  10. calvus

    calvus Getting Crunk

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    I agree with this. My hands & wrists hurt like a bitch for the first few months. Also my ribs, but your body gets used to it & experience will help you maneuver out of risky positions earlier.
     
  11. silvasurfer5253

    silvasurfer5253 Purple Belt

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    This is pretty spot on. The more you do it, the stronger your body gets. I seem to get an minor injury a week, but stretching, ice, rest all help. Also, watch how you're rolling. If doing a lot of no-gi, moving fast and doing alot of scrambles...well stuff happens. Rolling Gi and taking bottom (rather than scrambling) position have helped me avoid injuries. I also do alot of core conditioning and weight training, which I believe helps. However, I concur with daruckus, in I wouldn't take time off to focus on these things.
     
  12. wildman1717

    wildman1717 Green Belt

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    Its part of the process, your body will get use to it. Good Luck.
     
  13. serjio jitser

    serjio jitser White Belt

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    I been trained bjj for more than 6 years. I'm 40 y.o. and blue belt now. I broke my knee (bad uke) while doing judo throw in bjj club. It took me more than a 1 year to recover after ACL reconstruction surgery. Now I got serious neck issues, every head turn radiates in my right arm. I believe I made mistake doing bjj. It's a great fun, but injury happens all the time. When I did fitness, I almost never got injured.

    So I wonder what is the injury statistics in BJJ?
    Internet is full of motivators for BJJ, so I want opposite in order to help myself from desire to go back. Please send me your opinion, "why better not to train BJJ".
     
  14. Daniel Fox

    Daniel Fox Green Belt

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    I guess it is a balance between how much you love it, and how much you are willing to put up with. I am 46 and I wrestle 3 times a week, am I little old to be wrestling? Yes but I really like and enjoy it, and I have done it for most of my life so I keep doing it. Will it affect me when I get older? I hope not, but it certainly is possible. I know a 75 year old who still trains on the mat 2 days a week and won the Veterans World Championship at 71. Should a 75 year old still be training? Most Physicians I imagine would say no. I guess it is a personal decision weigh the pain, the time lost through injuries, against how much you actually like doing it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2017
  15. CFGroup

    CFGroup Green Belt

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    Jeez man what a bummer!

    Judo throw in a bjj club....Well that was your problem!

    I'd only train with my Judo buddy at BJJ when they'd try the standing stuff when I supplemented BJJ with my regular training!

    People would try to join in all the time, but we were adamant about not getting injured by untrained Uke's

    They don't teach Ukemi and the safe way to step when you throw someone so they don't land on U.

    Man sry that happened!
     

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