should you do s&c like the pro fighters

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by rizky, Aug 12, 2016.

  1. rizky

    rizky White Belt

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    Should an amateur guy duplicate the strength and conditioning that they see on youtube like ufc fighter s&c? Like pull and push sled , box jump etc
    Because on the gym the coach only make the amateur do the basic calishtenic and stuff like jumping rope, high knee , etc . So should i try to do exercise that the pro do?
     
  2. j123

    j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

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    I'm guessing you mean for a relatively new amateur or athlete, and not a higher end ammy (which is almost similar to a pro)

    Your body isn't as developed as them yet, so a simple and basic plan is more than enough. Not to mention, how many are on gear as well, which throws the numbers off. Its the same when someone like RDA showcases a part of his regimen doing plyos, and everyone who watches tries it out. The thing is, most of the guys who do it, don't have the maximal strength base to be able to incorporate that training to be effective, and in the worst case, they may actually get injured.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2016
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  3. KILL KILL

    KILL KILL Gold Belt

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    This. Not to mention, you're only seeing a small portion of their training. It's most likely highly specialized to fit the needs of that specific athlete. Not many athletes follow a "one size fits all" training regimen.

    That doesn't mean you can't take little bits and pieces and apply it to yourself. For instance, if you see a drill you think may be beneficial, see where it can fit in to your own training.
     
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  4. aus101

    aus101 Black Belt

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    I don't really like sleds, the body position isn't optimal for air intake, stick to air assault bikes and barbell linear progression for your extra strength and conditioning.
     
  5. pokerandbeer

    pokerandbeer Green Belt

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    you really really need to get Joel Jamiesons' book
     
  6. MandirigmaFit

    MandirigmaFit Blue Belt

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    Generally, we cannot say if you need to be doing what you see in the videos because we do not know what you are capable of or what you are watching.

    For example, a box jump, which may seem like a simple power exercise can be used to develop speed (velocity or reactive ability) or power (explosive). We do not know which you may be seeing in the videos and we do not know what you need to develop/train for.

    But sure, you can if you want. Progress slowly and you will be ok.
     
  7. gspieler

    gspieler Silver Belt

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    To paraphrase the FAQ...some fighters succeed despite their S&C program, not because of it. Most mma S&C programs I've seen look a lot your basic CF class.
     
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  8. jgarner

    jgarner Red Belt

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    Read the sub FAQ and you'll get your answers. In short, no. You should never try to emulate a professional's program for the simple fact that you aren't him and you don't have his weaknesses and strengths. He probably has 10 years or more of training history that you don't have, and his needs are different than you.

    As a beginner fighter, you should be working on general strength and conditioning, which would include a LOT of skills work and a little bit of time doing some basic barbell movements like squat, deadlifts, standing presses, and power cleans. You don't need to do any of that crazy stuff until you've developed a foundation on which to build from.

    Read the FAQ. It's a pretty comprehensive read that will get you started on the right path.
     
  9. rizky

    rizky White Belt

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    why we should train like that?
     
  10. jgarner

    jgarner Red Belt

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    Why? Because it's the most efficient use of your time. As a beginner, you should spend the majority of your time doing skill work, which is where most of your endurance will develop. A beginner needs to become technically proficient before moving to advanced training. When you're spending time doing crazy cardio exercises you could be doing more skills training which will increase your endurance and your talent.

    As far as becoming a stronger fighter, your time in the gym is best spent doing heavy sets of big compound movements. Since you're not worried about muscular endurance (that's done in skills work), you just want to get more powerful. Powerful strikes come from speed and your ability to produce force. Speed is taken care of by training proper technique. You ability to produce force is based on you limit strength in the necessary muscle groups. You get the most bang for you buck in training limit strength by doing strength training with barbell squats, barbell press, deadlift, and powerclean. Since 80% of your time should be dedicated to skills training, you only have so much time to spend in the gym. You want to optimize your time and cut the bullshit.

    As a fighter, you want strong legs, hips, core, back and a strong shoulder girdle. The best way to get those strong in the least amount of time is by doing the big 6 compound movements in a rep/set scheme that allows you to progress in weight quickly and not spend hours in the gym. Really as a fighter, I would say 2 days in the gym for 1 hour or less each session is plenty of time for a beginner. A simple A/B split routine would be more than fine. For example.... One workout you could do squat/press. The other workout you do deadlift/powerclean. Each movement you work up to a single max set of 5 reps. Each week, you add weight to that max until you can't anymore. The volume is low enough to keep you good for skills training, and elicits enough of a training response to get stronger.

    As your work capacity grows there's more you can add in, but that's just my personal opinion on a good overall plan for a beginner getting into fighting.
     
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  11. rizky

    rizky White Belt

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    Why pro not doing that way? How much foundation is needed and do pro fighters already achieved it? And why advanced training is bad for beginer?
     
  12. jgarner

    jgarner Red Belt

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    Well it's not so black and white to be honest. There are pro fighters with all sorts of methods and training histories. A lot of successful fighters have a strength and conditioning background and thus already have a strong base to work from, which is why they can get away with doing other things than the big 6 movements. Some of them don't believe in doing any strength training, but I think that philosophy is absolutely retarded and goes against all known sports science.

    Advanced training is bad for beginners because you haven't built the foundation on which the complicated stuff stands. In other words for the advanced stuff to really make a difference, you already need to be at a certain level.

    As a beginner you'll gain more bringing your squat, deadlift, and press to a moderate level than doing the weird stuff you see pro fighters doing. As far as how much is enough when it comes to strength training, I would say a general rule of thumb would be something like...

    Squat 1.5x bodyweight
    Deadlift 2x bodyweight
    Standing press 1x bodyweight
    Powerclean 1x bodyweight


    Of course those aren't exact, but once you get into that range I think your time could be better spent elsewhere. That's not to say that you can't go higher, but time management is important. If you bring your squat from nothing to 1.5X BW you'll probably notice a big jump in your striking and wrestling. If you go from 1.5x BW to 2x BW, you might not notice as much of a jump.

    On top of this I think the most important thing to remember is that pro fighters think they are special little butterflies. They are the only athletes where a lot of them think that strength and conditioning isn't important for their game. Every other physically demanding sport has it's athletes doing the big movements in the gym. So when a fighter says you don't need to squat/deadlift/press. I just assume they are ignorant.

    As time goes on though, more and more pros are doing correct S&C. Again, the most important part of training should be skills work. It should take up a solid 80% of your time. The other 20% would best serve you doing the big compound movements for limit strength. A nice A/B split, twice a week would server a beginner well.
     
  13. TheeFaulted

    TheeFaulted Inzer Belt

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    Just read the damn Q&A.
     

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