Shin pain

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Gurkha, Jul 19, 2010.

  1. Gurkha

    Gurkha White Belt

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    Hi all,

    Been having this problem for quite aometime now and haven't been able to figure it out.

    The facts:
    - The front of my shins are all bumpy. I played hockey(field) and football(soccer) throughout school and university and got knocked on my shins all the time.
    - When I run a long distance 10 Km or so, I almost always get sore shins. They don't normally hurt while I run (sometimes they do and I have to stop), but are sore for a few days after esp. when I try to massage, stretch and relax my shins.
    - I don't get any pain on my shins during my boxing training, it only happens on long runs.

    Questions:
    - What are the bumps? Is it the bone or is it tissue deposits?
    - Is the pain because of the bumps or is it just that my running technique is putting stress on my shins?
    - I am interested to learn MT or kick-boxing in the near future. Will my shins pose a problem? I ran yesterday, and right now any pressure on my shins is painful. I definitely won't be able to tolerate a kick or a block.
    - Most importantly how can I fix the problem?

    I know it is a lot to ask with my ambiguous observations, I am going to see a doctor about it this coming week. I was just curious to know if anyone else on the forum has a similar problem and if they know how to overcome it and strengthen my shins.

    Thanks in advance and best regards to all.
     
  2. Origins

    Origins Blue Belt

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    It could be from improper running technique. If you are absorbing too much of the impact with your heel it can give you shin splints, knee problems, etc.
     
  3. grrthetree

    grrthetree Green Belt

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    Well for treating the sore shins, just for short term relief, I've heard ice, stretching lower leg muscles, etc.

    Like he said^^ improper running form does transfer energy incorrectly, and by landing more on your forefoot you alleviate the stress on your knees and shins, but add that stress to your muscles. All the cushion in running shoes acts as a buffer of sorts, and really your muscles need to be taking the impact, not the heel of the shoe. You can research all that on your own because its been repeated a hundred times. And you don't need special barefoot shoes to run correctly.
     
  4. Switch

    Switch White Belt

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    Yeah, sounds like shin splints. Stop running till you se the doctor, and do what he says. Longer you persevere the longer it will take to heal. If at all. I ran through mine for a year, and now it's something I have to keep a constant eye on.

    I did find MT made it worse with the bag kicking tightening my calves, but had my first fight (without shin guards), and didn't break nothing. :D The bumps are normal, everyone has the small ones at our gym, and bigger bumps are reminders to set up the kicks.

    Hope that helps
     
  5. Gurkha

    Gurkha White Belt

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    Thank you all.

    Saw the doctor. He just gave me a pain-relief ointment and told me to rest. :icon_conf

    What I guess I'll do is take it easy with the running for now. When I'm better I'll start again and concentrate on how my foot lands.

    One thing I've noticed, when I run with my fancy Asics I get shin pain much more than compared to when I'm just wearing converse all-stars. But then maybe that's just because I take it easy when I'm wearing the all-stars and push harder with the purpose made running shoes.
     
  6. grrthetree

    grrthetree Green Belt

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    Asics have a gel and cushiony heel, which means that you can exert less energy per stride, and land on the heel and make it feel natural. With the all stars, there is even cushion/rubber on the base of your foot, so it doesn't impede your natural foot motion as much. It's not a matter of pushing harder that would cause your pain.
     
  7. Switch

    Switch White Belt

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    I've seen a few people for my shin splints, and the sports doctor and sports physio both recommended calf stretching and ice massages - freeze a styrofoam cup filled with water, rip the top off, and dig into the area for about 15mins.

    If you're dumb like me, do that after your runs, and couple more times through the day. But if you want to be smart, take the time off, and ease back into it. Here's some scaremongering - I've heard you've higher chance of shin breakage with shin splints.
     
  8. The Intensity

    The Intensity White Belt

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    I totally agree with what everybody has suggested so far. I used to experience mild shin splints after HIIT/long distance running and it killed me throughout the day. What I did was do my best to correct my running technique and posture and I invested $15.00 in a pair of in-soles for my shoes. I got a pair from a brand called SofSoles, they make one called Athlete and they slide in and out of all my shoes. They cured my shin splints, are preventing over-pronating, and supporting my arch really well. Go to your local footwear department and try out a pair. I hear Asics makes a damn good running shoe too.
     
  9. Rado

    Rado Blue Belt

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    Take time off till it's good. Training with an injury is one of the worst things you can do in sports. I have done it before and it only gives you the impression that slow progress is better than no progress at all (time off) but in fact you are regressing because you are only making you injury worse.
     
  10. Gurkha

    Gurkha White Belt

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    Thank you all for your advice..

    Right now my shins are fine, but I plan to not run long-distance for a few more days.

    The Asics are nice but I guess the heels are what do me in. I think flat-heeled shoes with uniform padding are best for me. Right now the all-stars are fine, later on I'll look for specific running shoes that will let me retain my natural foot motion as grrthetree mentioned.

    If it doesn't work I'll try out supportive in-soles as suggested, but I guess my issue is not lack of support (maybe too much support is what spoils my technique).
     

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