Rear foot when jabbing

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Grey Kid, Jun 2, 2008.

  1. Grey Kid Orange Belt

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    Question regarding the push off with the back foot in a jab.

    Should I be pivoting on the ball of my rear foot when throwing a jab, in the opposite direction of a cross (i.e the back heel moves clockwise in an orthodox stance, rather than pivoting anti-clockwise)

    Or should it just be a flat out small push?

    Thakns in advance for any input.
     
  2. mvisit1 Blue Belt

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    Flat out small push.
     
  3. Guards Blue Belt

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    Push flat out small.
     
  4. Cardio Blue Belt

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    Kabuki?

    My backfoot depends on the type of jab I'm throwing, my position, and opponents position.

    Stiff or standard jab, I'll push off by back foot for power, or step & glide forward by pushing off the backfoot. No rotation normally.

    Floating jab or jab off a "catch" will be a little more springy on the backfoot. Backfoot is loaded slightly differently but still no rotation.

    For flikr jabs, I'm usually positioning my feet for a better punch, so the backfoot depends on what punch I'm setting up.

    If I'm circling and jabbing I'll usually rotate the backfoot into the jab.

    Likewise if I coming off a right cross I'll snap and twist backfoot into the jab like u mentioned.

    So it depends on the situation.
     
  5. millasur Blue Belt

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    I dont rotate the rear foot at all when jabbing, but if I need a bit more power I try to push off more on my rear foot when 'stepping in' the front foot for the jab. Sometimes when I'm tired I tend to arm punch the jab, so I've been trying to work on snapping of the hips to make sure it shoots out rather than 'paws' lol. I'm sure the definitive answer will come shortly ... :icon_chee
     
  6. GunnyHighway Banned Banned

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    No Pivot, just a straight push, like a shot put, your using the floor push for power, getting your weight into, their are different kind of jabs, a fast quick jab to keep your opponent off balance and a power jab for the KO.
     
  7. GunnyHighway Banned Banned

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    No Pivot, just a straight push, like a shot put, your using the floor push for power, getting your weight into, their are different kind of jabs, a fast quick jab to keep your opponent off balance and a power jab for the KO.
     
  8. GunnyHighway Banned Banned

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    No Pivot, just a straight push, like a shot put, your using the floor push for power, getting your weight into, their are different kind of jabs, a fast quick jab to keep your opponent off balance and a power jab for the KO.
     
  9. roadwarrior357 Green Belt

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    I don't pivot when I throw a jab. My foot is already turned at about a 45* angle I just lift up onto the ball of my foot, push off and turn into the power jab. My foot doesn't rotate any more than it is though.
     
  10. i agree, but when doing pad work or sparring, find your range and step in with your front foot the jab, then slide your rear foot

    dont step in too much, or you can get counter like judah uppercut on miguel
     
  11. mschatz Hamma: I has it

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    With the jab you should be pushing off your back foot, not stepping with the front foot and sliding. With the cross, there is more of a sliding forward of the rear foot.
     
  12. ambertch Purple Belt

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    Dude remember this one thing: in any punch one foot is always rooted on the ground


    Do this: go up to a heavy bag and throw a quick left-right hook without trying to move. Throw a jab-straight without trying to move. Throw a jab-straight-left-right hook without trying to move. Do your feet pivot one at a time? Or has your stance widened and when you throw that hook, do you "hop" and twist both feet at the time? If so, bad right? You're not planted.
     
  13. earthman32 Orange Belt

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    Technically, you should only be turning on one side for any punch. With a jab, that would be your lead leg. The objective of turning is to get your shoulder to 12 o'clock. If you turn both sides, you take yourself out of your guard and leave yourself open to counters.

    Some people lunge into their jabs, but this is because they lack the proper foot work to close the distance. My suggestion: learn to allow your opponent to walk into your jab.
     

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