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Rapid Heart Rate and Shin Splints

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by King Ghidorah, Aug 29, 2010.

  1. King Ghidorah

    King Ghidorah Brown Belt

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    Hey guys, quick question for you all.

    How long is my heart rate typically supposed to stay rapid after training? I train pretty intense and lately I have been noticing my HR will stay between 113 to 120 2 to 3 hours after training. Is this a problem?

    My other question is about shin splints. I have been sprinting on the treadmill and on the track and my endurance is great but it seems my shins give out before anything else. I stretch for 15 minutes before my workouts but my shins still give in on me. Does anyone have any techniques or stretches I can try?
     
  2. pliftkl

    pliftkl Green Belt

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    What is your normal resting heart rate? Some degree of elevation after intense training isn't abnormal, but that seems high unless your normal RHR is high.

    Did you ramp up quickly to doing a lot of intense sprinting? You may simply need to cut back and let yourself gradually work up to the sprinting that you are doing.
     
  3. King Ghidorah

    King Ghidorah Brown Belt

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    My resting HR is 68 taken in the morning upon waking up, around the day during standard daily activity it can be anywhere between 88 to 92.

    As for the tread, I usually start my sprinting with a 10 minute walk at 2.8 speed and a 3 incline I will then boost it to 4.0 with a 3 incline and jog for another 5 minutes. The sprint begins at 9.0 for 30 seconds then I jump onto the rails and take a 30 sec rest and continue the cycle for 10 minutes, usually ending with nausea :icon_chee


    My cool downs are usually quick, do you think I am leaving the gym to soon? how long should a typical cool down be? I usually stretch for about 5 minutes and then drink a PW shake and go home.
     
  4. grrthetree

    grrthetree Green Belt

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    Try running more on your forefoot when running, especially when jogging. This will prevent that hard heel strike which is the cause of shin splints.

    I seemed to get shin splints when I would do long, slow runs, surprisingly, not the high impact sprinting. So make sure you try to strike with your forefoot instead of your heel when jogging, and sprinting.
     
  5. h7jb7sg1e

    h7jb7sg1e Blue Belt

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    It will require a longer interval, but it is better to have active recovery between sets instead of abruptly stopping. Drop your 9mph to 2-4mph for 30 seconds or more; it will take an extra 30 seconds to lower and raise it back up. Therefore a total of 60 seconds or more active rest interval. Also what exactly is your cool down after the sprints? Ideally your cool down should be as long as it takes to lower your heart rate to sub 60% MHR, this takes at least 3 minutes, but will vary greatly depending on the individual.
     
  6. FlameBoy

    FlameBoy Green Belt

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    All the people that I have ever had complain about shin splints, I have told them 1 cornerstone piece of advice - Train your Tib Anterior, Extensor Longus Digitorum, and Perneous Longus.

    Imagine your Tibia is a Bow and your Soleus and Gastroc are the string of the bow. A stronger set of calves will cause the bow to "bend" more - putting strain on the front of the bow - ie - your shin, they start to splinter - hence shin splints!

    Its easy to overtrain the gastroc and soleus and neglect the muscles at the front. Put some equilibrium back in your lower legs, along with the stretching, should clear up no problems!
     
  7. Hotstreak1987

    Hotstreak1987 White Belt

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    I'm a bigger guy so I'm forced to run on grass or snow instead of a treadmill lest I get shin problems no matter how my foot strikes the ground.
     
  8. grrthetree

    grrthetree Green Belt

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    Are you sure you're running with a different foot strike? I'm also pretty big, as far as running goes, but you are probably much bigger than me, and I haven't had any shin problems once I started running with a forefoot strike. I also do much more running than just treadmill conditioning every once in a while, so I'm doing more volume.
     
  9. Lowry

    Lowry White Belt

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    My shin splints get very intense, you are supposed to refrain from running for about a month to give your shins time to heal up and use an elliptical or the bikes as an alternative to running. Works just as good.
     

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