Quick question about wrestling set ups

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by cooltoon999, Nov 2, 2010.

  1. cooltoon999

    cooltoon999 Orange Belt

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    So i've been to a few wrestling practices now and it is the most kick ass thing i've ever done! It's just open mats from now till mid november, so it's mostly just techniques and live wrestling. I've been pretty much getting raped, but BJJ has taught me to keep my ego in check :D. I only know a basic double leg, and now just recently was shown the low single leg, which is money (or atleast from my limited experiance with it)!

    So I guess my question is what are some good set ups to let shots off? So far all i've been trying to do is do a push/pull type of thing, and pop the elbows up then shoot. I also have been trying to do an armdrag, but can never seem to get it. Any advice?
     
  2. CyberFreq

    CyberFreq Blue Belt

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    Armdrags are typically best set up when your opponent is off-balance and 'leaning' into you. Their forward momentum combined with your arm drag will give you the nice armdrag nearly everytime.

    A good way to hit an armdrag is to use a wax-on, wax-off motion; use your non-dragging arm to pull their arm across their body to your dragging arm and finish the drag from there.

    As for a shot, shooting head-on is usually not a good idea. It's too easy for them to sprawl straight back, they can defend with their upper body better, and they see it coming. Use angles, circle around, step side to side, shoot off a failed armdrag, shoot off a successful armdrag.

    I would also learn how to pick the ankle and knee. Ankle picks are better for the actual takedown, but knee picks are good for hitting a snatch single setup. Get a good collar tie and force them to step way forward with one leg and/or be very explosive. Drop down while maintaining the ankle pick and rip their ankle out from under them while extending your tied-up arm.

    One of the biggest tools you can learn to have above-decent takedowns is the ability to off-balance your opponent; work with any decent wrestler and you will know what I mean when I say that they know how to use body-grips like clothing.
     
  3. cooltoon999

    cooltoon999 Orange Belt

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    I sort of have a phobia of shooting shots, something I need to build confidence in, partly why I am asking about set ups.

    Do you have any specific examples of ways to off-balance opponents?
     
  4. supersuk

    supersuk White Belt

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    You probably have a phobia because you're shooting into uncontrolled environments.

    Worry less about the setup, and worry more about controling the other person into a position/angle where your shot will be a high scoring chance.

    practice arm dragging, 2 on 1's, clinching.
     
  5. fourfif**

    fourfif** Banned Banned

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  6. justkidin

    justkidin White Belt

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    I love the low single, and my favorite setup is called the shuck. When they try to tie up with you, before they grab
     
  7. InfiniteWit

    InfiniteWit Orange Belt

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    Ask a team mate. The vast majority of wrestlers will be willing to help you.
     
  8. MMABullrider

    MMABullrider White Belt

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    Watch your opponent's footwork. Try changing your own steps, then watch how they "counter" with their footwork. We used to do "hands free" takedown drills, where two guys sparred while holding relay batons with both hands behind our back (like you're wearing handcuffs). You didn't have your "hooks" to grapple with, so the only way to take a guy down was to set up his footwork and attack at the appropriate time.

    Play with putting pressure on your opponent in different ways:

    Feigning shots
    Switching to southpaw
    Switching circling direction
    Changing your elevation
    Bumping with your shoulder
    Tapping the chin, shoulder, forehead, headgear, knees, hands, etc with your hands
    Feigning hook ups (collar ties)

    All of these things, and more, can affect your opponent's footwork. If you can bring the shot to you, then it's much easier to succeed with your takedown. If you can successfully learn to take guys down with no hands, then takedowns are super easy when you add your hands back into the mix.

    Wrestling is a fairly simple game. Even olympic level wrestlers only typically use a select few techniques (3-4) from each position (standing, top, bottom). They may have a wider arsenal that they KNOW, but the trick to wrestling is to be HIGH LEVEL at a FEW techniques.

    My personal wrestling style is offensive. I usually like to keep pressure on my opponent, whether we're tied up or not, and dictate the pace of the bout. I like to come in quickly circling "outside" to make start bringing his lead foot towards me, then quickly change directions, which usually makes him plant his lead foot. If he's slow, I'll shoot the double or single leg on the first one. If he's quick, I'll use the direction change to aggressively tie up. I'll break loose and repeat. 2nd or 3rd time, they almost ALWAYS leave their lead heel planted to brace for my tie up, giving me an easy single leg or snatch single.

    Against a guy like me that puts a lot of pressure, I use evasive footwork to make him chase me. If he ties up aggressively, then I'll lower my elevation (drop one knee if I have to) and put pressure UP against his tie up to get him used to pushing forward and down, putting his weight on his toes. Then I'll break the tie up, and bait him into tying up again... When he does, I'll either arm drag/duck under, or firemans (or even standing granby).

    Against a guy that makes a lot of linear shots (doubles, singles), I'll bait him with my lead leg, then stuff his shot with my rear leg hip, and slap on a front headlock or over-under tip, then roll him over to his back.

    Against a guy that shoots a lot of circular shots (snatch singles, arm drags, duck unders), I'll look for the wizzers, or front 3/4 stack.

    Moral of the story, have a game plan, but plan to utilize HIS game-plan against him.
     
  9. cooltoon999

    cooltoon999 Orange Belt

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    Alright thanks guys, i'll play around with using pressure to set up shots, and also i'll see about incorporating the 2 on 1 stuff too. Anything else anyone wants to add?
     
  10. td82394

    td82394 Brown Belt

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    The clinch. Make it your friend. There are beastly moves from there. Most judo throws are available, plus you have the duck under, the snap down, the snake, etc.
     

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