Quick question about squats

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Professor Jones, Sep 28, 2013.

  1. Professor Jones

    Professor Jones White Belt

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    When I'm struggling in the ascending phase of a squat, I tend to transfer the weight from my heels to my toes. I know this is bad form but I would like to understand why it is easier when I do this, does anyone have an explanation ?

    In the meantime I will deload and make sure my form does not break down before adding weight again.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2013
  2. Mr Mojo Lane

    Mr Mojo Lane Brown Belt

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    Probably better guys than me to answer this but if you look up, think about pushing with your heels, and go at least parallel, you tech should be at least OK. If you are looking at 11:00 or even 12:00 you're body should go in that direction.
     
  3. Oblivian

    Oblivian Aging Platinum Member

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    I don't know what you mean by it being easier when you do this. Your probably losing upper back tightness and not staying tight. My guess is that if you cured that, you'd find reps easier.
     
  4. magick

    magick Green Belt

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    Probably because you're not going as deep as you would normally when you shift your weight to your toes.
     
  5. ravenman2000

    ravenman2000 White Belt

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    Yep. It feels like you are going just as deep when you are more on your toes because you are leaned forward and bent more at the hip (but less bend at the knees), but your hips are not actually lower. Take a video of yourself doing it both ways, and you'll be surprised. If it turns out the way I'm thinking, then you can probably address the issue by keeping tighter, saying a bit more upright, and as mentioned above, driving through the heels on the way up.
     
  6. redaxe

    redaxe Silver Belt

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    It also probably feels easier if you're like most people who are inexperienced at the squat--you're not used to properly sitting your butt back into the squat, and your quads are much stronger than your underdeveloped hamstrings and glutes.
     
  7. Professor Jones

    Professor Jones White Belt

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    I've been squatting for a few months, and I'm at 100 kilos 3x5. So yes I don't have lots of experience. I make sure to always go below parallel, and I only use my toes when I struggle, otherwise I'm on my heels. What do you mean by sitting my butt into the squat ? Any advice is appreciated, I'd really like to polish up my form.
     
  8. Cratos

    Cratos Banned Banned

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    Post a video.
     
  9. redaxe

    redaxe Silver Belt

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    If you don't know what I mean by that, read this article and then practice the "Third World Squat":

    http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/the_thirdworld_squat
     
  10. lonewolf210

    lonewolf210 Orange Belt

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  11. Professor Jones

    Professor Jones White Belt

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    Excellent article and just what I needed. I tried it and it's hard, the lack of mobility in my ankles is making it impossible to not fall backwards. But I will practice it everyday, holding on to something like advised, thanks.

    I'll try to find someone in the gym to film me while I squat tomorrow.
     

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