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question to long time MT practioners?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by toasty, Jul 26, 2005.

  1. toasty

    toasty Orange Belt

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    Just started training MT after a couple years of a TMA.....It seems MT uses way less techniques, just brutally effective ones not the variety of kicks, throws and katas like the TMA's, and I'm wondering if your MT is still evolving after years of training or do you reach a point where the techniques are pretty much down pat and you work just to keep up on conditioning, timing, and sparring to stay used to contact.....If you did reach a point where you feel you weren't learning new techniques, how long were you traing before you hit that point?

    ps- I hope the tone of this question is properly respectful to both the MT and the TMA practioners... this is no way meant as style bashing of either one...
     
  2. Goran Plecas

    Goran Plecas Amateur Fighter

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    learning never ever ends,remember that muay thai is waaaaaay more then it may appear in the beggining.the beauty of mt is that you can get familiar with the basics in couple of months but upgrading those basics is a real deal and it never stops
     
  3. Brandinho

    Brandinho Guest

    It will take years to learn all of the techniques. You will get the basics down in the beginning fairly easily. Focus on them and become proficient, as they will be your base in the years to come. I am always learning a new move. There is more out there than you will find in any books.
     
  4. Matt

    Matt Titanium Belt

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    The cool thing about MT is you can pretty quickly learn the fundamentals you need to be competent. However, as you'll learn when you start to train and spar with more experienced people, there are lots of little subtle things you can continue to hone and learn that will improve you as a fighter. Power, speed, timing, tricks, advanced moves. So even though the techniques are the same the way you apply them can be very different. This is why a more experienced MT guy will typically outclass and destroy a less experienced MT guy - all other things being equal.
     
  5. mixicus

    mixicus Yellow Belt

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    If I'm not learning I must not be paying attention. True the instruments of MT are simple but the music is in their symphony.

    A quick look at some of the basic combos I practice (4 count or less) gives about 20 punch-only, 10 punch-kick and 10 punch-kick-elbow-knee. That's 40 simple combos that fall out of 6 punches, 6 kicks, plus a knee and elbow. Do these until they're reflexive against a bag or the pads. Change the level (low, mid or high kick; body or head hook). Do them off simple defenses (bob, weave, duck, cover, ride, slip). Throw in footwork and movement. Fight from the opposite lead on each. Ready for clinch work?

    You get the idea.
     
  6. Brandinho

    Brandinho Guest

    http://www.mustwe.com/mt.jpg

    This is something our kru gives us on day one. I found this in the back of my desk. Bear in mind this is only referring to the basic moves, and not the complicated ones. Kind of mind blowing.
     
  7. Rory McDonell

    Rory McDonell Green Belt Professional Fighter

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    thats crazy!
     
  8. sir037

    sir037 Forever Noob

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    This is what I usually do. The only thing I do different is that I'm just doing punch combos, I'll go to a 5 count.
     
  9. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    You are aware there are two types of Muay Thai in Thailand right?

    I had never seen this until I met my second Khru. He was telling me of the monks (as he was one) and how they train and fight differently from the ring-fighters. When he showed me the difference physically it was astounding.

    There is a plethura of Muay Thai moves you never see because they aren't that practical in the ring unless you bring your strength and speed to such a height of athleticism that you can pull-off wacky shit in mid-fight. Some of the diagrams I have seen are pretty laughable, but some are very intriguing. This is true with most Arts that are as old as Muay Thai. I know it sounds like "Secret Shao Lin 37th Chamber" stuff, but it's usually true. Any of you who has had a teacher you respect, you always are aware the dude knows shit he just won't teach you unless you dedicate basically a lifetime to learning.
     
  10. Metafour

    Metafour 武士道

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    Thanks for sharing that I never thought of it in that perspective!
     
  11. Brandinho

    Brandinho Guest

    Very true. There is a whole other world out there outside the ring. It has its roots in various sects of muay thai, krabbi krabong, and the combat arts in general. Every now and then I learn something new and it blows my mind. A good kru only reveals as much as you deserve to know or have proved to him. There is so much shit he is holding back.
     
  12. Chthon

    Chthon Silver Belt

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    Like everyone has said, the basics come quickly, but you never stop learning the nuances. You can try to memorize all the strikes and combos, but there's something extra that you won't get without sparring or competing. Can't really think of anything to call it, just special little things.

    Ex.: some guys will block shin kicks to the body with their forearms. This is not necesarily a bad thing as long as their elbows are conditioned and then just let your shin meet their forearms, rather than shoving their forearms forward into your kick. If you notice a guy pushing his forearms out, make sure to really telegraph your shin kicks so he sees them coming and will keep pushing his foreamrs into your kicks. He'll think he's slick and your offense is weak, when really you're just letting him destroy his own arms.

    Small tricks like that are things you will continuously learn as long as you fight.
     
  13. toasty

    toasty Orange Belt

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    thank you all for your response and for confirming my suspicion that there is a lot to MT that I am unaware of at this point....
     

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