punch/kicking combinations

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by sourdiesel209, Jan 16, 2013.

  1. sourdiesel209

    sourdiesel209 Green Belt

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    Having done both muay thai and boxing, Ive noticed that just like the rear uppercut loads up a left hook... a left hook loads up a rear roundhouse kick, and a straight right loads up a lead roundhouse kick, etc. Now this opens up some nasty punching/kicking combos.. dutch style..

    anyone knows other creative ways to combine punches + kicks? like how cerrone jabbed, then stepped to the side at the same time and headkicked melvin guillard...

    kinda unrelated, but dont wanna make a separate thread about it... since your supposed to get your head off center when throw a roundhouse kick in MT, is it possible to slip a straight punch countering it with a kick?? would need some sick timing to pull it off..
     
  2. Solexe32

    Solexe32 Yellow Belt

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    Yes you can slip punches with kicks. One of my favorites is when they throw a cross your head slips to the outside at the same time you are throwing a right head kick. You just parry with your lead hand and throw the kick, not too hard to time. You can slip either way with leg kicks, just depends on your positioning vs theirs.
     
  3. stangbanger

    stangbanger Purple Belt

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    Aldo's shovel punch to the liver followed by the low kick is beautiful to watch. As is GSP's superman jab to low kick.
     
  4. Phlog

    Phlog Dad Belt

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    I find a rear roundhouse flows off a 1 2. Light left round, 1 2 3 big right round. Is fucking money.
     
  5. NAKMUAY18

    NAKMUAY18 Brown Belt

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    No superman punch off GSP is beautiful to watch
     
  6. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

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    Don't think so? :wink:

    I fully do not understand GSP's Superman punch, or why he throws it. He doesn't sell the kick at all, and doesn't cover any more ground than he could have with a normal jab. But it works, so... GSP, do your thing.
     
  7. stangbanger

    stangbanger Purple Belt

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    The one he landed on Penn was gorgeous. Had Penn checking the kick that never came.
     
  8. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    GSP's lead hand superman punch isn't so much a "feint kick", if you really watch it closely it is actually more of a "feint takedown/shot" that transitions into that lead hand superman. He picks up his front leg, springs forward like he is shooting a TD then throws that lead punch. If you think about it, against another orth fighter that lead hand superman is really a more defensively sound option as it doesn't put his head on center to eat a knee/right hand, like the rear hand superman does.
     
  9. Bennosuke

    Bennosuke Blue Belt

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    Kind of mentioned before, but your two basic options are to switch left to right (lead hook to head or body--> right kick) or to throw a kick from a same sided punch.

    With that in mind you can chain together hundreds of combinations.
     
  10. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    Slipping straight punches and countering with kicks is extremely effective. IMO, the best way to do this is to not just slip, but slip n step. Taking a short lateral step with that slip get's you into a better position offensively and defensively IMO. Ideally, you'll slip n step in one motion, and the step doesn't need to be drastic, a short subtle lateral step to open the hips is all you need. I.E: slip jab, short step with rear leg - or /, lead leg kick...... or slip cross, short step lead leg - or \, throw your rear leg kick.

    The step will change depending on height you want to throw the kick following the step (assuming stationary opponent, for simple explanation). I.E: low kick slip n step forward / or \, mid kick slip n step - or - ........ High kick slip n step BACK (very subtle) / or \. I am a long lanky guy and one of my favorite ways to counter with high kicks is to parry and counter with a high kick using a slight step back / or \. I.e: parry jab- step \ with rear leg and throw lead leg high kick. Same concept for cross, pull back (knocking/pushing down cross with lead hand), stepping back / with lead leg, rear leg high kick (this is a bit tougher to time).

    This exact same concept works for looping punches as well, this is another example of how the bob n weave (done correctly and conservatively) can be used in KB/MT. Instead of the slip n step explained above, just roll under (tuck n roll) looping punches, take that same short step - / \ and kick.

    For much more advanced kick counters to jab or cross. Get really good with the timing and with enough flexibility in your hips you can parry, pull back, or slip jab/cross and kick off the same side vs. opposite (described above). I.E: slip/parry jab (pulling back slightly), step back / lead leg (very subtle). throw rear leg high/mid kick over top of the jab or into high floating ribs (dig that shin in just below opponents armpit when jabs extended, right in those high ribs :icon_twis)........
     
  11. NAKMUAY18

    NAKMUAY18 Brown Belt

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    That never even occurred to me! Make alot of sence though. It seem like such a slow set up, you can see it coming before he even throws it. I'm usually cursing that the that the opponent should have seen it by the time it lands. If the guy sees GSP drop his level he's gonna be shifting his upper body fwd and his legs back to sprawl like a mofo, straight into GSP's fist. Add the fact the every GSP opponent must have been drilling to sprawl at the first sign of a level change for months, they probably don't even realize that they are doing it.
    Sully consider me enlightened!!
     
  12. NAKMUAY18

    NAKMUAY18 Brown Belt

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    That's what I couldn't understand, GSP is a good enough kicker, but I couldn't see him destroying anybody with kicks. And his superman generaly comes when there in the middle of the cage sizing each other up, no after a string of kicks. I couldn't get why no one tried to eat them and counter
     
  13. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

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    I didn't consider the takedown either, but it doesn't explain why he lifts his knee in the typical superman punching motion? Surely a simple level change would suffice? You could find the same angle by just dropping slightly and throwing the jab while stepping forward with the rear leg at an angle.
     
  14. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    Go back and watch how he sets it up. If you pay close attention, he will typically change levels first (just before sp punch, quick drop in elevation), get his opponent setting up to defend TD, then use that lead hand super man. This works so well for GSP because of the distance he's able to close so fast with his TD's. He doesn't use that SP punch in close, he typically does it to close distance. He springs in off that back foot, so when his opponent sees that front foot come up, they expect him to fire in, so they set their stance or pause, then as GSP's upper body comes forward they drop/open guard to defend the shot and bang......eat the lead hand. If you go back and watch the fights where GSP lands this shot, his opponents aren't defending the lead leg kick, they are defending the td/shot as he comes forward......... You'll see that they don't pick up their lead leg as if they were going to check a kick, they drop and open their guard expecting the TD.
     
  15. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

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    So you think he lifts the foot to mimic a deep step into a takedown?
     
  16. stangbanger

    stangbanger Purple Belt

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    That makes a ton of sense. The one that's sticking out in my mind though is when BJ did raise his leg to check the kick.
     
  17. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    I don't know if that is what he is trying to mimic or not, you'd have to ask him, but his opponents reaction would indicate that is what they are expecting. I don't think any of GSP opponents go into a bout with great concern for his leg kicks, or inside leg kick. They are concerned about defending the TD, and whether or not that is GSP's intent with that lead leg superman punch or not i have no idea. Regardless, what makes that technique effective for gsp IMO is not the threat of the leg kick, it's the threat of the TD and his opponent's reaction would indicate the same.

    Yeah, but BJ is always light on that front foot (rear foot heavy) and GSP had been throwing that inside lead leg kick a lot against BJ. If you watch that close, you'll see bj lift that leg, lower/open his guard and come forward with his upper body, like he was expecting GSP to shoot. Either way, BJ regularly raises that front foot to defend single leg shots and sprawls out his rear leg. He's got really good flexibility and dexterity in his hips and does defend TD's the same way, lifting up that front foot. Watch his earlier fight with Matt Hughes, you'll see him defend that single leg much the same way.

     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2013
  18. KarateStylist

    KarateStylist Yellow Card Yellow Card

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    ^^^ GSP's fast.... & surprising in movement....

    ^^^ MMA Strikers can't continually react well-enough & they get caught....

    KarateStylist
     
  19. PeterPain

    PeterPain Brown Belt

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    I love jab, jab, right elbow, left knee.
    If my steps in a combo carry me into a south paw stance I either keep it for awhile or do my spin lend back Orthodoxe.

    I don't do the KB shift stance.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
  20. Azam

    Azam Brown Belt

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    Jab followed by either a cross, inside leg kick or low kick (from orthodox & southpaw) - keeps them guessing.

    Jab followed by a straight or a fake straight - to a rear roundhouse kick (from orthodox & southpaw) or a mikazuki geri (crescent kick) or inside leg kick or low kick.

    Counter to straight or jab (have to be in opposite stance to your opponent) - soto uke (lead) to ushiro mawashi geri (spinning hook kick).
     

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