Progress Through Watching Technique

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Neuro, Jul 2, 2010.

  1. Neuro

    Neuro Purple Belt

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    How much do you guys think you can improve your game through simply watching videos (and/or reading technique [Saulo's Jiu Jitsu University, Royler and Renzo's book, etc.]) as opposed to learning at school?

    My question is NOT do you think DVDs and books can teach you jiu jitsu alone (really, we don't need that argument again), but what I'm asking is:

    To what degree, or how much, do you think that watching MGinAction or Draculino's videos, etc. can help your game, when combined with the usual going to class, drilling, rolling.

    Do you view the studying of technique when you get home as equally important? Only partially important? Not at all?

    Hypothetically, it would seem that studying technique constantly could help your game massively, but rolling is still the key to implementing the technique.

    If so, how do you think you can maximize the learning aspect? What do you do that you find maximizes your performance from watching the videos or reading the book? Taking notes? Etc.

    Apologize for the long read; eager to hear your guy's thoughts.
     
  2. lechien

    lechien Gold Belt

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    It helps a lot.

    As your game evolve thought the belts, your personal technical research is vital.

    I do not think one can just rely on his instructor to "spoon feed" him.

    For exemple, you could develop a different game so research is important.

    Let look at it from a university point of view,

    At purple belt, I started writing my thesis for my PHD, my instructor is my mentor and supervise my research by guiding me and correcting my mistakes.

    Once he feel that my thesis is completed, he will give me my BB.
     
  3. Sloth

    Sloth Brown Belt

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    I think it helps a lot. If you are learning the moves you can picture yourself doing them as you watch the video. You can pick up small details about techniques you already do or learn the same move from a different perspective. Or, if you don't like a certain position or technique (say deep half for example) you can study how to avoid it or defeat it and implement those things into your real training.
     
  4. Sloth

    Sloth Brown Belt

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    Also, I think note taking and prioritizing are very important to maximizing your video study. Writing/typing notes are useful, or if you are short on time doing a voice recording. If you have time, you can take video software and do a voice over with your notes of the match which can be good for future reference as well as help friends that you may wish to share your notes with. Check out grapplersguide.com if you get the chance, there are lots of effective examples of video analysis and note taking on there.
     
  5. mtruitt76

    mtruitt76 Purple Belt

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    Seemed to have worked pretty well for Helio Gracie.
     
  6. biggamehit

    biggamehit Blue Belt

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    it works. I read and watch and I could see the difference so could the others who I rolled with.
     
  7. Hillary

    Hillary Brown Belt

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    I don't watch instructionals or online videos except in VERY rare occasions. I just don't learn that way.

    I do, however, learn from watching CLASS. I smashed my orbital one time and after surgery had to sit out for 6 weeks. I would watch class, watch my peers make mistakes and have the little details corrected and emphasized. As well I'd watch the black belts roll with lower belts to see how they'd just handle them. That I learned from.
     
  8. mtruitt76

    mtruitt76 Purple Belt

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    On a serious note. I think you can learn from instructional tapes if you approach them right.

    First, start with what you know. If you play spider guard, look for instructional tapes demonstrating spider guard moves. Since you already have a familiarity with the basics of the position you will be able to pick up on the moves easier and you will be capable of more readily implementing what you watch into your game.

    Second, stick with positions for an extended period of time. This is very easy for me due to the way our classes are organized. For example, we will work half guard for over a month going over passes first and then sweeps. So during this time I will watch instructional tapes on half guard since I will recognize positions I have been in or positions I am having problems with and the material will be easier to learn due to the relevance. Also I know that I will have a chance to practice what I am watching.

    Third, if you are watching material about a guard or pass series that is completely foreign to you, learn to hold the position before implementing moves. For example, if you if you pick up Cyborgs DVD on the tornado guard. Watch the dvd to learn the position and familiarize yourself with the attacks from that position. However, don't just go out and try to hit a bunch of sweeps from tornado guard next class. Just practice getting into the position and being able to hang out there, get a feel for the guard and all the different ways your opponent reacts. Then start implementing sweeps from the dvd.
     
  9. ijustwannasurf

    ijustwannasurf Brown Belt

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    I prefer to watch competition footage, and reverse-engineer techniques I like. I'm a bigger guy- watching Comprido, Gurgel and Jacare always inspires/helps me out.
     
  10. Iqmatic

    Iqmatic White Belt

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    I feel that watching the videos online helps to broaden your horizon, and helps to develop your own game, which can be different from what the instructor is teaching you and help you in the situations where you can end up, which were not covered by your instructor, or were covered awhile ago. However, even when i watch and understand every small detail of the technique, doing it yourself is very different. some of the moves, like hip moves, the balance during the move require you to learn how to do it only by doing it.
    It can be easily explained: when you watch you use your visual cortex, and when you do it yourself you also use your prefrontal cortex and your motor cortex. If your motor cortex has never done this move before, your visual cortex, no matter how advanced it is, will not be able to teach your motor cortex. you have to use your prefrontal cortex to create a sequence and send the commands to your motor cortex, which then has to implement the sequence of commands. Basically, you need to initiate every move in your brain yourself and then try to do it.
    I think watching competition footage can help one to get out of the plateau, helps with motivation when you are stuck or just helps to refresh your game.
     
  11. Jagcorps_esq

    Jagcorps_esq Red Belt

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    It helps. It shows you nuances that are technically correct and that build off of your existing knowledge...that you got at a class.

    It would be almost worthless for someone that doesn't train to watch someone like Damien Maia and understand it....it'd just look like too much. I train....it's still almost too much, but I can glean from it more than I could a year ago or two years.
     
  12. Iqmatic

    Iqmatic White Belt

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    it may be similar to solving a math problem. When you see a solved problem it may look very easy and elegant, and totally clear. however, when you try to solve similar problem yourself, you suddenly realize that it is very difficult and you don't know how to get through the necessary steps to the solution. and the only way to learn how to do it is to do it yourself.
     

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