Please critique my sparring session

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by szJack, Jun 7, 2014.

  1. szJack

    szJack Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    8
    Hi there!
    First thread:
    http://forums.sherdog.com/forums/f11/please-critique-my-tournament-2594859/

    Second thread:
    http://forums.sherdog.com/forums/f11/please-critique-my-tournament-2653135/


    It's been a while and I have some footage from today's sparring session to criticize.
    Doesn't look as I would like it to, but fuck it, need to swallow my pride and put myself to critique, as before - and every time I got a great feedback. Also - felt more like competing than sparing session, probably because it was recorded and I knew sherdog would be judging, rotfl.
    <excuses mode>First two fights - I felt gassed instantly, maybe because I didn't warm up properly, maybe because it's saturday, and it's my last session that week and everything kind off wears on me </excuses mode>
    Anyways what I think I suck at in these videos -
    kicking - I have quite heavy legs, and I'm having a hard time throwing them around a lot quickly as well as knees.
    Using my right hip too much, instead of left when ducking right hand, but it's improving as it was one of my focuses lately
    I don't move head after every combination, but I do it more often than I used to.
    Probably I am standing a too tall, but I'm not sure - opinions?
    Definetly should circle more.

    Here goes:
    I AM THE GUY IN THE HEADGEAR and awkwardly short shorts.
    Smaller guy is my trainer, I have about 50lbs or more on him. He's much better than me and I didn't want to just walk forward and eat everything on my guard (I find that useless for mma especially), that's why I was backpedaling.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIZHCU3ElTc
    First two rounds

    Some number, next one, felt the best, more relaxed (my frist round is always my worst):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N10a9PQq-2Q

    Last one, gets a bit brawly... also felt good, got little tired at the end...:D:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2PWCN1-nCo


    Thanks!
     
  2. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2011
    Messages:
    6,217
    Likes Received:
    37
    Location:
    The Nasty Nati
    Embeds, for lazy bastards.





     
  3. szJack

    szJack Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    8
    Thank you, I was having a problem with that :D
     
  4. szJack

    szJack Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    8
    up, please ;]
     
  5. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2011
    Messages:
    6,217
    Likes Received:
    37
    Location:
    The Nasty Nati
    Give it time, man. It took almost two days before people started commenting on my bagwork video, and now there's a legit discussion happening in that thread. It takes people time to get around to watching three whole videos.
     
  6. apizur**

    apizur** Aggressive Finesse.

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    3,794
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    Tampa
    Yeah at 30 minutes of videos I could look at the first one realistically.

    You show some good techniques, you use some parrying, some head movement, you do a shove-by towards the middle of the second that I thought was really impressive.

    There's three things I really noticed... for one you never really went up the middle when he went on guard. When you did go up the middle you found it most of the time.
    The second thing is you kinda get bouncy and become neither defensive nor offensively effective. He really knows how to capitalize on this and usually when he comes forward and you're bouncing, he gets away clean.
    The last bit is that jab. You might as well not even throw it. A guy like that should not be able to walk up to you like that without paying a toll. I know you're not blasting each other but you need to snap that jab a little, it's just a jab. It was completely ineffective in controlling anything in terms of distance. A lot of the time it didn't even inspire him to cover up... or he just countered with it. A guy like you fighting a shorter guy should make that shorter guy respect that jab.
    Other than that, I'm not a MT guy, but you looked pretty sound and pretty controlled.
     
  7. fightingrabbit

    fightingrabbit Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2006
    Messages:
    13,205
    Likes Received:
    3,844
    You can't seriously expect me to click a link can you?
     
  8. szJack

    szJack Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    8
    Thanks apizur!
    so:
    -My jab does not exist here, this is true, I need to fix that asap!
    -More straight punches
    -stop bouncing?


    Which / when one do you mean?

    Thanks for the input!
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2014
  9. apizur**

    apizur** Aggressive Finesse.

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    3,794
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    Tampa
    Yes, I'm not necessarily saying use MORE jabbing (although that's fine), but when you jab, hit him at the end of the jab with a little pop.

    More uppercuts when he goes on guard.

    Just take notes of when he follows you when you start bouncing. "Hopping" into position is fine, but when you straighten your legs and start bouncing you disarm yourself. At 6:57 you threw a combination then worked your way out. At 8:10 you threw a combination then started to bounce straight up... notice he rushed you afterwards?

    8:44 is the shove by. You pushed him, changed angles and set for attack. It was beautiful.
     
  10. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2012
    Messages:
    6,016
    Likes Received:
    1,299
    I think you're looking good. You should believe in your jab a lot more, especially on defense. You were pretty consistently able to make him either pull back or cover up with it, but you abandoned it when you got pressured. Try this: after you make a defensive move with your footwork, stick him with a jab. Do this pretty much every time, whether you pivot or hop step or just step away put your jab back in his face immediately to tell him you aren't retreating, you're moving in position to hit him back. You'll start seeing openings to put another shot behind that jab or even to replace the jab with, just make sure he knows he can't simply walk at you.
    You did better at this in the third round. I like the example at 2:20 of the second video where you jab him to stop him in his tracks, then kick his leg immediately. You can do that but also with different punches and have a lot of success, I see the openings for it throughout these videos.

    I notice you drag your rear foot forward after throwing a right hand pretty frequently. You want to be very careful with this. As that right foot is coming forward it's a great time to hit you or shoot on you, and you'll be very easy to knock off balance. Don't do it just to reach unless you have a planned defensive reaction after, typically rolling and stepping offline. You can also use that to switch forward and kick or knee, but be aware of the risk.

    You sometimes get happy feet when throwing a combination. It's ok to punch and move sometimes, but you also need to be able to set your feet and let your hands go. If you're moving your feet as you punch, you generally want to use your punches to disguise your movement into a better position where you will plant and attack with harder shots. A solid example is 1:15 of the last video. You pop out a quick 1-2, hop step to an outside angle with your left hand then throw a right uppercut and left hook. Nothing really lands, but you get off four (kind of five if you count the left as you move as a punch) unanswered shots and force him to disengage.

    A tight, long straight right is conspicuously absent from your game. As the taller guy, you were throwing a lot of those punches from too close and without much commitment. You let him stand very close to you the entire time and didn't really work to make your right hand hit him. Part of this is probably because you were standing tall and had your rear foot too far behind you much of the time. Getting more bend in the knees and if possible getting your rear foot closer in would give you the ability to throw a right hand with more authority. The kind of right hand that even if he blocks is gonna stop him in place and give him something to worry about. The lack of that punch is maybe the biggest flaw I saw, I would advise you to work on that immediately.

    I really like your timing when grappling enters the equation. You do a nice job timing your level changes both on offense and defense. There's a great moment at like 3:44 where he slips your jab and goes for your lead leg, but you pull it back with a hop step and get your hips clear, then immediately fire a right as you pivot into him. When the right misses and you get square, you reestablish your position and range with a jab then get back to work. This lets him know that not only can you stop the td, you can hurt him for even trying. I also like some of your entries. Around 4:56 you get him to pull his weight back with a jab. You then capitalize by throwing your right hand as you step your right foot forward in position to grab a single leg, which you are able to pick up pretty easily because you've forced his weight back. These are very nice moments, and if I remember correctly you're more of a grappler right?

    The main thing to take away from my post is honestly to develop your jab. Currently you're using solid footwork when you get attacked, but you need to be able to convert that into offense. Bend your knees and set your feet after moving, then look for the openings to hit. Even if the opponent blocks or evades, just being able to make him stop and suddenly need to defend himself will go a long way towards affecting his mentality and the perception of anyone watching (judging) the fight. Having a good straight right to complement this improvement in jab technique and timing would benefit you a lot.
    I think you should spend some time developing your ability to follow your jab with your other punches and kicks. There are subtle adjustments to make to your foot placement, weight distribution and elevation as you jab that will be conducive to each different attack following it. You already have some sort of foundation in that your jab is pretty good technically and you're clearly willing to throw it. You just need to build off that, believe in it and use it to set up your next attacks. I know you've seen this thread, but maybe reread it, study the examples in it and talk to your coach about how you can implement the different ideas into your own game: http://forums.sherdog.com/forums/f2/using-jab-mma-2700177/
     
  11. szJack

    szJack Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    8
    SUPER AWESOME!
    So much new material to work on! Read it all, probably gonna read it 100times more.

    I DO have problem with following jab, indeed. I can feel it, just not sure how to correct it. I am gonna reread the thread you posted. If you have more advice on this one, I'm happy to read it.
    And yes, nice, long right straight is my rearly my go-to punch, I need to change it.


    Thank you, apizur and a guy!
     
  12. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2012
    Messages:
    6,016
    Likes Received:
    1,299
    Think of it this way: your jab moves you into position to hit. This can mean stepping to an angle, which would help your game too, but more importantly for you I think it can mean changing your body position so that when your jab lands (or even when you stick out a feint), you are in the ideal starting position for the next punch you're gonna throw. Either that or you are able to shift to that starting position very quickly.

    For a right hand follow up, this means you need to keep your weight back when you jab. Try lifting your left heel a little and letting your right heel rest on the ground (but keep your weight on the ball of the right foot, just let the heel make a bit of contact for balance) when you jab while bending your knees. You'll notice that your right hand is perfectly loaded. Now you can use your jab to move there if your weight is forward by pulling your weight back as you jab (pushing it back with the left foot might describe that better).
    If you wanted to throw a left hook, you would need to let the weight come a little forward. I don't mean necessarily leaning all the way forward, you don't want to move too much no matter where you start because you don't want them to see you load it clearly. But let your right heel come up off the ground as you jab and push more weight onto the left foot. This leaves you ready to quickly turn your shoulders counterclockwise (as if throwing a right) slightly to load then immediately clockwise to fire the left. Take it slow, feel the subtle weight shifts and exaggerate them if you have to.
    If you wanted to kick with your right foot, you could also push your weight farther forward during the jab so that the kick is ready to go more quickly without having to shift then kick. Be very careful not to let your lead foot turn in for this of course, but also don't take a huge step outside with it. You threw this well though so I won't waste time on it.
    For a left kick, you can switch or step as the lead hand extends. Instead of just switching and kicking, jab as you put your weight on the rear foot and pick your lead foot up to pull it back, keep that jab in his eyes as you complete the switch and spring into the kick only to pull it down once you need it for balance and counteracting the swing of the hips.

    Practice these things individually until they are second nature and can be done without thought. Then you'll be able to adjust your attack on the fly based on your opponent's response to your jabs.
    It should also be included that you need to practice defending all manner of attacks that you might face as counters, specifically watching out for the right hand or low kick and double leg in an MMA context.
     
  13. szJack

    szJack Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    8
    Great, this is gold!
    Thanks James! (It's James, right?:D)
     
  14. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2012
    Messages:
    6,016
    Likes Received:
    1,299
    Yup, that's me.
     
  15. peanut66

    peanut66 Green Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,130
    Likes Received:
    9
    really enjoyed your sparring vids , we spar the same way (with attempted take downs )

    develop and believe in your jab , as pointed out by others , a nice stiff jab is exactly what was missing from your tools , the guys walked you down only because it wasn't there

    also as important as that jab is a good solid leg kick , once you start establishing your leg kicks it opens up the the top half and also keeps guys from walking you down .

    a few techniques you may try :

    we are all familiar with throwing a combination , 1, 2 or 1,2,3 ect... try stringing two or three preset combinations together , for instance try throwing a 1,2 , cover up and throw immediate liver , overhand right , just as an example ,

    personally i keep a few preset combos on hand for certain scenarios , play with it and keep a few for yourself , it really helps against the guys who like to walk forward

    all in all sparring looked good , good luck in your training
     
  16. szJack

    szJack Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    8
    thanks :)
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.