Pickling Veggies

Discussion in 'Dieting / Supplement Discussion' started by o'dubhlaoich, Aug 11, 2010.

  1. o'dubhlaoich

    o'dubhlaoich Red Belt

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    Anyone have any experience pickling veggies? I want to make my own pickles. I also want to pickle some shrooms. Any advice would help.
     
  2. Happnin' Mojo

    Happnin' Mojo Brown Belt

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  3. o'dubhlaoich

    o'dubhlaoich Red Belt

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    Thanks mojo. I love me some pickled shrooms with tons of garlic.
     
  4. Clint07

    Clint07 You like blood? Violence? Freaks of nature?

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  5. JSN

    JSN Bitch Lasagna

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    ive made one batch of kimchi in a glass jar and one batch of sauerkraut with a harsch crock. pretty painless experience. i think i'm going to buy a picklemester.
     
  6. IDRISCKY

    IDRISCKY Purple Belt

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    Real pickling, by fermentation, is pretty easy. Once you have the basics you can pretty much ferment anything from pickles to mead(honey beer/wine) to kimchi and sauerkrauts to sourdough bread. Let bacteria do the work for you. None of this gay canning, boiling, vinegar crap.

    Basically all you need is a container, water, vegetables, whey and salt. The whey is optional, and it's liquid whey like from yogurt, not protein powder. In most cases you'll need more salt if you don't use whey, and how much salt is personal preference. Playground and find out what you like the best. But you will need some salt in almost every situation. Some people even use sea vegetables in place of salt, as if the sodium in seaweed is somehow "healthier" and different than table salt. Basically keep the vegetables submerged in the brine and let lacto-fermentation do the rest.

    Two books I recommend: 'Nourishing Traditions' by Sally Fallon and 'Wild Fermentation' by Sandor Katz.

    Nourishing Traditions is basically a giant cookbook based on the principles of The West A. Price Foundation. It's nearly 700 pages and over sized compared to standard novels like most cookbooks.

    Wild Fermentation is around 200 pages and solely about fermentation. He talks about everything from containers, to recipes, to the benefits of live culture foods, and even some history on fermentation itself.

    I'd suggest getting both. But if you're only going to get one, get Wild Fermentation if all you care about is pickles and/or fermentation. Nourishing Traditions if your interest are more towards traditional food preparation, hunter gather, paleo, West A. Price type nutrition/cooking as well as fermentation.

    I'll try and copy some recipes for pickles from my two copies in the next couple of days when I get enough free time.

    Edit: Totally forgot. As Clint07 pointed out. Alton Brown actually did an entire episode of Good Eats on lacto-fermentation pickles using an old ceramic style crock. As well as vinegar pickling.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2010

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