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Ouchi Gari, no gi.

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by wildcard_seven, Jul 14, 2005.

  1. wildcard_seven

    wildcard_seven Purple Belt

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    I've been working the major inner reap from a head and neck tie. Basically, from the position where me and my opponent both have the head and tricep, I will pull him forward then push back and drop in deep to snap his leg. I have had a little success with this. But, I was wondering if anybody could help me make it a little better. Basically, I do it just as described above, no other technical details. So, if you can add something, that would be cool.
     
  2. Cojofl

    Cojofl Brown Belt

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    So you're moving into him as he is going back. That probably gives him a good lot of time to react.

    I don't use it much, usually off a failed uchimata. What i do is grab a wrist with one hand. I underhook the other arm and try and bring up my fist up across his throat neck. Pushing my fist in gives me a kuzushi (balance break) similar to the one i use with the gi. It's not that effective but works sometimes

    Karo might be more help http://www.groundfighter.com/uploads/videos/Karo Parisyan Judo 2 Ouchi Gari.WMV

    He has a whole dvd on Ouchi.
     
  3. wildcard_seven

    wildcard_seven Purple Belt

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    I like the advice, makes sense. So i should pull him in and then go for it while he's coming in? If you are a judo vet, maybe that underhook works for you, but in submission grappling-where people are in hunched wrestling posture with their elbows in, I find it extremely hard to get an underhook. I like the video clip too, but same thing, I think it works better for MMA where people keep a more upright posture. Although, If you have any tips for getting the underhook on people in this wrasslin' position, I'm all ears.
     
  4. The Sickness

    The Sickness Ichizoku

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    Location:
    Ridin' shotgun with Alexander Karelin in Fedor's b
    I use it no gi much more effectively as the old wrestling inside trip. Let me find a link...
     
  5. Cojofl

    Cojofl Brown Belt

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    I'd pull out the arm i'm grabbing the wrist with out to the side. He'll usuallly pull back when i tug. That'll mean he has transferred his weight onto a single legwhich you then reap while pushing him back/offbalancing with the fist across the throat.

    I'm mostly judo for standup grappling, so wrestling guys may be more helpful.
     
  6. wildcard_seven

    wildcard_seven Purple Belt

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    please. I'd like to see this trip.
     
  7. wildcard_seven

    wildcard_seven Purple Belt

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    Hmm. Still, that helps me picture the motion a lot better. Sounds cool to me.
     
  8. Balto

    Balto Silver Belt

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    Disclaimer: My standing judo throws are pretty sucky.

    That being said, I use ouchi-gari the same way as you described. However, I rarely use it with the intent to actually get the takedown. On rare occasions I will, but usually the person defends. As far as I understand, this is usually the case in judo as well.

    I think most judoka use ouchi-gari more as a setup than a finish. I think of it like a boxing jab. It is not a very risky throw to attempt (at least not compared to osoto-gari or the hip throws). However, it usually doesn't finish the job either. I use it to force the opponent to defend and give up another opening.

    I don't know if that was much help. But that is how I use ouchi-gari.
     

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