Off season strength training important for muay thai /kickboxing/boxing?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by MMouse, Aug 25, 2010.

  1. MMouse

    MMouse Now you enter...the shredder Banned

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    I was wondering if off season strength training is important for muay thai figthers, kickboxers and boxers as it is for grapplers, wrestlers ect?
     
  2. VoodooPlata

    VoodooPlata Brown Belt

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    Well, if you got hit by DJ Squalls, would you get knocked out? Then consider being hit (sloppily, to account for differences in technique) by Quinton Jackson. Which would you prefer?
     
  3. DrBdan

    DrBdan Something clever

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    Since when is there an off-season for fighters? I guess you just mean a long period time between fights?

    Anyway, being strong is important for any fighter though I would argue that technique and conditioning play a much bigger part in striking. That said, you don't have to be an elite powerlifter but you also shouldn't be weak as shit.
     
  4. DannyT

    DannyT Orange Belt

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    That's what I'm saying. You're a fighter 24 hours a day.
     
  5. TheeFaulted

    TheeFaulted Inzer Belt

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    Perhaps he is doing a collegiate boxing program where he has an off season.
     
  6. MMouse

    MMouse Now you enter...the shredder Banned

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    Yes, I meant periods before fights.

    Since you mentioned technique and conditioning play a bigger part, would you say perhaps muscular endurance training is much more suitable to strikers then strength training?
     
  7. betamin

    betamin Blue Belt

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    Nahhh, unless you're pretty weak in that aspect (which the simple act of training your sport should solve), I think you could benefit more from doing squats, deadlifts, powercleans, rows, bench and overhead press. Those are the foundation for most programs and as a striker they will get you something to put behind your punch. Make sure to read the FAQ.

    EDIT: I forgot to mention that it all depends on your objectives, if you want to have more power then definetly you should work some heavy weights + powercleans, if you want to improve your conditioning then perhaps it would be better to mix roadwork with circuits (with or without weights) and specific work to your sport.
     
  8. xilliun

    xilliun Brown Belt

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    Endurance comes with your training, hit shit a lot and you can hit shit for longer.
    Being stronger has its advantages no doubt, just stick with big compound lifts. If you can only hit the weights for half an hour or so at most, definitely focus on leg work such as squats and deadlifts.
     
  9. Not so much for striking arts IMO, power mainly comes from technique and genetics (though it can be enhanced to a point), and conditioning/endurance allows you to use that power over and over again. Plus i'd imagine you'd be doing alot of calisthenics anyway if you're with a legit boxing or kickboxing gym, those will suffice for strength as far as the striking arts go.

    ^maybe some explosive (olypic-ish) lifts, in higher reps? That's all i can think of that would really help you in striking...oh and plyos.

    But if you're wrestling or doing submission grappling, max strength training can give you an edge. People say it's all technique with jiu jitsu, blah blah etc, but when you look at the high level competitions you see guys that are ridiculously strong like ze mario sperry, don't tell me a guy like him wins matches on pure technique every single time.
     
  10. DrBdan

    DrBdan Something clever

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    Oly lifts yes, high rep no. Oly lifts should be done for low reps so you can be as explosive as possible.

    Any fighter will benefit from achieving a solid strength base. You don't need to have an elite powerlifting total but you also don't want to be as weak as a kitten.
     
  11. Ian Coe

    Ian Coe Silver Belt Professional Fighter

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    I personally started lifting 1 month before I started MT and never found any issues and have been told I hit reasonably hard (then again I count people that say that as pandering to me).

    The striking arts need good torque and rotation along with a strong base. Everything else comes from repetition repetition repetition.
     
  12. Perfect Moo

    Perfect Moo Blue Belt

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    Anything above 5 reps on olympic lifts starts to become more conditioning than strength and power. Try and do 15 clean and jerks with a challenging weight. Even if you get them all, you'll sweat like a pig.
     
  13. DrBdan

    DrBdan Something clever

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    You will also find that the majority of people will have form breakdowns trying for high reps which isn't a good thing with Oly lifts. They are also supposed to be an explosive lift so doing them for high reps defeats the purpose. You might as well do something less technical for conditioning.
     
  14. betamin

    betamin Blue Belt

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    Once striking technique is precise and relaxed (like second nature), there is no greater benefit to striking hard IMO than some cleans, jerks and snatches.
     
  15. Ian Coe

    Ian Coe Silver Belt Professional Fighter

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    and rotational core work
     
  16. zx

    zx adventurer

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    Agree for core work and body rotation.
    Well conditioned MT guy will not "sweat like a pig" after 15 reps of any exercise.
     
  17. Ian Coe

    Ian Coe Silver Belt Professional Fighter

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    I sweat like a pig after 3 rounds of shadow boxing and sweat pretty easily.

    Although I think you're talking about not being very strong and not the fact that sweating easily is a sign of good core temperature regulation.
     
  18. miaou

    miaou barely keeping it together

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    In my MT days, my cardio and muscular endurance were outstanding and I did sweat like a pig. Actually "sweating like a pig" is probably an understatement in my case. I naturally sweat a LOT.



    I agree with strength training not being nearly as important for MT/kickboxing as it is for wrestling/grappling. If anything, I think the greatest benefits of strength training for a standup fighter would have to do with joint health, proper posture, "functionality" of movements (although I hate that term), and avoiding/fixing muscular imbalances.

    Explosive movements (sprints, plyos, oly lifts, shot put) can help with explosiveness, and rotational exercises (like land mines) can help with hip rotation, but only as a side complement to an exercise program rather than its core.
     
  19. DannyT

    DannyT Orange Belt

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    Sorry to hijack the thread or anything, but do you think Strength training is more important for a standup art such as Sanda? Seeing as we incorporate some wrestling and throws, I think strength training would help me greatly.
     
  20. MASShole

    MASShole Get it?

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    Isn't sanda just like MMA?
     

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