Noob's Game

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by lakergirl52, Jul 30, 2010.

  1. lakergirl52

    lakergirl52 Yellow Belt

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    What kind of moves, positions, etc. do you think are critical for a noob to learn? I just had my first BJJ Gi class yesterday. We did a lot of rolling and drilling and didn't (really) go over any techniques. I picked up a couple of basic half guard sweeps and that was about it. I'm just wondering what kind of things a newbie should be looking to learn. I know I need a lot of work on my bottom game and how not to get mounted and armbar defense. Anything else in general a new person should be asking about during an open forum time and such?
     
  2. Jagcorps_esq

    Jagcorps_esq Red Belt

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    Upa and bridge, to escape mount.
    Knee escape, to escape mount to half guard or full guard.
    Scissor sweep/knee push sweep from guard.
    Hip over sweep from guard.
    Cross collar choke from guard or mount.
    Arm bar from guard and mount.
    Triangle from guard.
    How to break open guard.
    Two passes, like knee through and a standing pass...maybe Toreador.
    Knee over mount and leg over mount.
    Americana from mount and side control.
    Kimura from mount, side control and guard.
    How to get hook on back.
    Rear naked choke from back.
    Collar choke from back.
    Escaping back control, scoop by Saulo Riberio.

    That should give you enough to work on for months.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2010
  3. Red Harvest

    Red Harvest Orange Belt

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    What he said.
     
  4. Drew Foster

    Drew Foster Silver Belt

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    JAGCORPS gave some good info.

    If you look at it, it's basically one or two solid escapes, sweeps, passes, subs from all the basic positions.

    Try to use the same hand full of techniques when you get to the right positions for them. You'll be doing a lot of surviving. It may take 3 months before you start feeling comfortable. Try to hang in there. I really suck at escaping sidemount for example. Everyone wants to tap, tap, tap people. Use the opportunity you have now to go ahead and get ahead of the curve on learning escapes, as you'll be in a bad position often. That way, when you improve on offense, you won't feel like you're drowning when someone good gets on top of you.

    From full guard keep the triangle and the armlock as your go-to submission. From the top, the cross-collar choke, armlocks, Kimuras, and Americanas should be your ace moves. Focus on those and your escapes and you'll be good.

    I don't even know why I'm still typing, JAG said it.
     
  5. lethalazn

    lethalazn Purple Belt

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    preferably behind you, with both hooks sunk in
    What JAG said...

    If you're going No-Gi the following (not mentioned in his list) is a must (even if you're a noob):

    1. Armdrag from Closed/Open Guard (you'll realize sweat won't screw you over on this move as much as the Armbar)
    2. Arm Triangle from Mount/Side Mount (so you have a choke from top mount without a collar)
    3. A sweep that works against someone standing over your open guard (less friction=harder for you to break posture and easier for them to stand)
     
  6. redaxe

    redaxe Silver Belt

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    Jagcorps_esq gave a good list of basic techniques, but I would put more emphasis on survival and defense skills.

    The very first things you will need to learn are:
    1. how to base and posture so you don't get swept/reversed
    2. how to protect your neck to block chokes, and
    3. how to protect your arms to defend against armbars, shoulder locks, and triangle chokes--from just about every possible position.
     
  7. Jagcorps_esq

    Jagcorps_esq Red Belt

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    Good point. It's sort of hard to think of things now, because they feel like natural reactions rather than technqiues.
     
  8. RibCrusher**

    RibCrusher** Orange Belt

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    unfortunately, you will probably not be taught this right away.
     
  9. mikecello

    mikecello ...in bed belt

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    My instructor didn't allow us to roll for the first three months of instruction because of the chance of being hurt or hurting others. It just sounds strange that they would throw you to the wolfs like that already. But there's a lot of different types of gym's.

    In any case. Just get the basics. Learn your guard (armbar, triangles, sweeps). that sort of thing. And of course how to pass guard. Apart from that, an instructor needs to really go over the specifics of a move to really nail the mechanics of it.
     
  10. redaxe

    redaxe Silver Belt

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    It really depends on the instructor. I didn't get taught this stuff right away, so I had no idea what the hell I was doing in sparring for the first few months, especially because it was at a judo club. I would basically just try to throw my partner's legs out of the way, jump into side control, and get an americana, every time. Or just collar choke the guy from inside his guard.

    At the Gracie Barra place where I train now, though, they don't let you roll until you get your first stripe, and they make sure you have a good arsenal of basic techniques and understanding of how to protect yourself, first.
     
  11. blackers10

    blackers10 Orange Belt

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    on the flip side you can always ask your rolling partner to go over some basics with you to help out your game.

    They have ALL been in your/our shoes(I am new also(6 weeks in)) and I just tell the person I am new
    once they realize I know next to nothing they will often say here from here you can do this or that

    On my 1st roll my partner went over what each position was and quickly went over ways to get out of it etc

    the HARDEST part for me has been learning the fundamental parts like moving your legs to keep your base and keeping arms in and realizing it IS a full contact sport where pain/uncomfortableness is part of the game.

    don't be ashamed of knowing nothing or being new etc. be open and let your partners help you out
     
  12. Vector_X

    Vector_X Brown Belt

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    damn nice list. Those are solid fundamentals period.
     
  13. lakergirl52

    lakergirl52 Yellow Belt

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    Thanks for all the tip/lists! That helps having some things to know to ask about. They kind of "threw" me right in because I trained out of the club at my university in no gi for about a semester and a couple weeks before I got a PCL sprain. I still went to practice after the injury though and did what I could. I've never trained with a gi before so that was new. And they set me up for most of practice with the other newest people so it wasn't that bad really. I didn't get swept when we were doing a sweeping drill! Highlight of practice. And my shot (which I sucked at before) felt more natural and not as forced. If you think of anything else- feel free to add in.
     
  14. Jagcorps_esq

    Jagcorps_esq Red Belt

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    Thanks.

    That's the list of techniques that I knew when I first started feeling comfortable while rolling.

    In fact, that's really all I knew when I competed the first time....and by knew, I mean that I'd trained them and perhaps drilled them a little. I still don't KNOW them.
     

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