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Noob carb question

Discussion in 'Dieting / Supplement Discussion' started by Ironpants, Oct 11, 2010.

  1. Ironpants

    Ironpants Blue Belt

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    Tried looking all over the forums for something that might awnser this but couldn't dig anything up...

    A newbie question probably to you guys but here goes because I'm no to smart here.

    Basicaly are carbs all the same no matter where they come from? I mean is there a differance betwen carbs from vegtables,fruits, legums ect and carbs from grains (like whole wheat pasta, brown rice/white rice ect)? I know this sounds dumb but would getting say 500 grams of carbs from broccoli essentially be the same as 500 grams of carbs from a grain source like a bowl of rice or is there a differance between those sources? I know about things like G.I. index levels and thats one differance between the 2 and the veggies would be less calories but is it basically all the same carbs in the end? Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2010
  2. Ironpants

    Ironpants Blue Belt

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    Bump.


    Anyone have any input?
     
  3. Envy

    Envy Silver Belt

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    I'm pretty sure more than one master's thesis on carbohydrate metabolism, their molecular structure, and insulin and its function, etc. have been written.

    It's a very broad question, much like "Hey what's the deal with protein?" In which we could point to 1000's pages of molecular bio and organic chem, or just tell you to eat it.

    In short, what carbohydrates you eat and how much depend on your goals, macronutrient composition of your diet, activity level, and nutrient timing.

    IMHO, carbohydrate is the least important macro, and after you figure your calorie intake, protein needs, and fat needs, then the rest of your calories can come from carbs. Of those carbs, vegetables must be consumed for a myriad of beneficial reasons and the remaining carbs are best consumed peri-workout.

    Also, carbohydrate cycling, or "eating for what you do" seems to be very beneficial for most, meaning having a higher carbohydrate intake on hard training days and a lesser carb intake on non-training days. That's a rather advanced technique though, and depends your knowledge/application of nutrition in your current diet.
     
  4. Ironpants

    Ironpants Blue Belt

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    ) Well as far as goals it was a low carb, possibly keto diet to help with making cuts. I've just had a real hard time with grains in general as far as them preventing any sort of loss. I'd eat a serving and a half of whole grain pasta every day (I'm addicited to it) just to keep me going through my workouts (in addition to everything else) but that was probably not a good idea even though I eat it in moderation, no? I just wanted to know if the source of your carb intake was as important because maybe I could get sufficent carbs from somewhere else instead of pastas and rices.
     
  5. Envy

    Envy Silver Belt

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    I'm seeing a lot of problems here.

    1. You don't have a specific goal. Making cuts as in weight cuts? Or making cuts as in getting rippzored abz? Either way, you need a specific goal, such as "I want to lose X amount of lbs. by competition weigh ins," or "I want to lose X pounds of fat while retaining my strength and muscle mass by Y date."

    2. You were trying to do a keto diet while eating a serving and a half of pasta. That's not keto. And if you felt you needed carbs to get through your day let alone your workouts, why go Keto anyway?

    3. Are there other sources of carbs other than pasta and rice? Uhh, yeah. Everything from fruit, sweet potatoes/tubers, squashes, oats, veggies, beans, milk/yogurt, to table sugar and coca cola. Start reading your food labels. Try experimenting with some of these and see how it goes. For instance, have an apple before you workout and a sweet potato after. Measure your results. Either continue, or scrap that and try something else.
     
  6. scottm

    scottm Green Belt

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    There are other factors you should consider also imo, like the anti-nutrient content of some carb sources (grains). Anti-nutrients found in grains include digestive enzyme (protease
    and amylase) inhibitors, phytic acid, haemagglutinins and phenolics and tannins.

    Envy pretty much covered everything else. I agree look at other carb sources for your goals like fruits, veggies, tubers, dairy.
     
  7. JUST BLEED

    JUST BLEED Guest

    There is good carbs and bad carbs. I run and lift weights so I choose to get most of my carbs of things like vegtables.

    The simple answer to this question is this: good carbs are unprocessed carbohydrates in their 'natural' state - or very close to their natural state. In other words they have been minimally altered by man or machine (or not altered at all). Most diet experts agree that green vegetables are the 'ultimate' good carbs. In fact, pretty much all 'leafy' vegetables and fruits fit into this category. Beans and legumes are also, generally, included on the 'good carbs' list, as are nuts and seeds. Finally, whole-grain cereal foods - including whole-grain breads and pastas - are considered by many to be good carb foods (although there is some disagreement over this).


    Good carbs have these healthy characteristics:

    ◦high in fiber: helps you stay full longer (and avoid overeating), provides sustained energy, lowers cholesterol levels, helps to remove toxins from the body
    ◦low glycemic index: stabilizes blood sugar levels and insulin production
    ◦high in nutrients: natural vitamins, minerals & phytonutrients promote health and help to prevent chronic disease
    ◦low 'energy-density' (except nuts & seeds): provides sustained energy, promotes healthy weight loss and long-term weight maintenance
    ◦greater 'thermic effect': naturally stimulates metabolism and promotes fat loss

    Many popular weight loss diets incorporate good carbs into their eating plans because they are so effective at lowering insulin production and stabilizing blood sugar levels. Also, because of their high fiber-content, good carbs make you feel fuller and help you to avoid overeating - a major problem for many people trying to lose weight safely!

    To sum it up, the following food types are generally considered to be good carbs and should make up most or all of your carb intake:

    ◦whole vegetables
    ◦whole fruits
    ◦beans
    ◦legumes
    ◦nuts
    ◦seeds
    ◦whole cereal grains

    Note: Some nutritionists include 'healthy' dairy products like low-fat milk and sugar-free yogurt on the list, but there is much disagreement over this so we'll leave dairy foods off for now.
     
  8. Ironpants

    Ironpants Blue Belt

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    1) Goal is to make the 150-60 weight division for wrestling team by next semester in january. I'm about 171 now and have probably more BF then the competition so that would put me at a disadvantage. I Want to retain or even gain some muscle mass for advantage while making the fat and weight cut.

    2) Havent tried the keto diet yet. Am considering it but I honestly don't know if I could get by on so little carbs, which is pobably the reason I'm not making any progress with my cut efforts.
     

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