Newbie question: How to avoid shelling up?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Mike32110, Sep 10, 2010.

  1. Mike32110

    Mike32110 White Belt

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    I know I'm going to get flammed for being a pussy, but whatever. I'm new to MT, been doing BJJ for a while. I have recently began sparring and quickly realized that when I was facing a larger/more experienced opponent, I would become very intimidated when they were throwing big combos at me. It seems my instinct is to totally shell up, to the point that I'm not looking at my opponent, and I end up just taking damage and not doing anything.

    Did anyone else have this problem? I notice when fighting smaller opponents, or people that are new like me, I don't run into that problem nearly as much. Do you guys have any advice? Is this normal for a rookie? I'd ask people at my club, but I'd rather get called a pussy by people online than in real life haha.
     
  2. guilineseguy

    guilineseguy Black Belt

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    Get a partner, and put your back to the wall so you can not turn away. And have your partner throw punches and combos at you. Start out slow, and increase as you get more comfortable. I seen this on a bas rutten training video along time ago, and it really works well. It will also help your movement because you have to do it in that position, or they are just going to throw combo after combo.

    Also work on your footwork, when they come in for those big combos try to circle out. Not straight back, work on head movement, and slipping punches....shit your in MT might not want to slip them like a boxer i guess, however you do it, do it. Just keep training, and after you get used to it, it is not such a difficult thing to control.
     
  3. Mike32110

    Mike32110 White Belt

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    That is some wicked advice man, I really appreciate it.
     
  4. c0r1nth14n

    c0r1nth14n Blue Belt

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    This worked really, really well for me.
     
  5. guilineseguy

    guilineseguy Black Belt

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    There is a reason why Bas Rutten is a god of fighting in any form. I watched his tapes before i ever trained, and yeah i didn't start out as a bad ass, and do not claim to be one now, but it helped because i already knew some of the "little things" that they teach you. Which helped alittle bit.
     
  6. ufcufcufc***

    ufcufcufc*** Purple Belt

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    start throwing the jab more a well.the reason why they are throwing big combos is because you are not doing anything. when it doubt jab and teep. teeps are awesome.
     
  7. Zaros

    Zaros White Belt

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    It's not just you, I did that heaps when I started sparring MMA (with the added disadvantage that I would then be taken for a ride). I suggest pretty much what's already been said, get a mate and let them throw at you without you moving back or shelling. Always keep them busy, doesn't matter what your throwing just throw something.
     
  8. ambertch

    ambertch Purple Belt

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    All this is good and should be done, but it won't necessarily help during sparring itself, because you might not have time to focus on these things while a guy is trying to hit you.

    So ALSO have someone (ideally the coach, but can be anyone) watch you spar, and yell at you to keep your head up / circle out whenever you put your head down / back straight up


    Obeying commands is easier than thinking, and you'll learn faster.
     
  9. stuntcum

    stuntcum Yellow Belt

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    Tidbit to add: most ppl shell up/turn around because they are afraid to get hit. Once being punched in the face doesnt scare you anymore, you can chose how to deal punches and kicks as opposed to just reacting naturally(shelling up).

    Only way to break this fear of getting hit is to get hit. So to avoid shelling up, just get punched in the face
     
  10. EasternWind

    EasternWind Blue Belt

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    While I kind of agree with you, it's a much more complicated situation than getting hit. Nobody likes getting hit. What he needs to learn is muscle memory in the form of doing something to get out of the situation. right now he doesn't really know what to do. Once he learns how to block/parry and utilize footwork in conjunction with counters and feints he'll slowly stop covering up.

    With that said TS, just needs more practice in any form really. The technique with back against he wall is only half of the total defense so I wouldn't really rely on it too much to help with shelling up, but most definitely good for learning how to defend with your hands and arms. Sparring is what's going to get you the results that you need in the form of footwork and handwork. So just go out there and practice. Ask your coach/sparring partners what you need to do to improve.
     
  11. xSEMTEXx

    xSEMTEXx Green Belt

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    When people throw combos, most of the time they alternate hands eg.Left,right,left,right.
    So next time when somebody is throwing a combo and you are shelling up, anticipate the next punch, dip under it and circle away.
     

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