Need help with defence in Muay Thai

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by cc85, Sep 5, 2010.

  1. cc85

    cc85 White Belt

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    Hey everyone, I have been having trouble with my defence in sparring and was hoping for some tips or strategies to improve. I have worked on stuff like bobbing, slipping and weaving and have practiced these techniques alot but when I try to apply them in sparring it never seems to work. Same thing goes for parrying the punches, the punches are to fast for me to affectively apply this technique. So when an opponent rushes at me with a flurry, I have to mostly resort to just putting up a guard with my hands and taking the punches which is barely affective.

    Can you guys give me some tips on how to have a better defence against an aggresive fighter or someone who comes with a flurry of punches because I cant compose my self enough to actually watch all the punches and apply the right technique. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. snowolf17

    snowolf17 Yellow Belt

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    i always say the best defense is a good offense, obviously you can't be throwing punches everyone second of the round but make sure you always fire back when they punch, let them know that if they are gonna step in and throw combos then they are gonna get hit back, i like to use the foot jab to keep people away so you might try that, also if you ever do light sparring ask your partner to maybe slow up a little so you can get used to slipping, weaving and parrying and a lower speed and then slowly build up in speed and intensity, hope this helps.
     
  3. mcdonkey

    mcdonkey Orange Belt

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    Throw a hard right hand while he's coming in... he'll be hesitant to run at you with flurries.

    Footwork... move backwards when he initiates the flurry then eventually move off to the left or right.

    Slipping isn't easy at all. Sometimes your not fast at doing it enough, or maybe your opponent just hits really fast. Sometimes you have to kinda predict what your opponent is going to do. For example, if he's running at you with a right cross, left cross, right cross and a low kick flurry (just naming a common flurry), after he hits you with the right cross you have to predict that a left hand is coming right after that. So immediately step to your right and get out of the way.
     
  4. Boxer123

    Boxer123 Guest

    You can teep when you see them stepping in to bomb punches, a hard teep will really take the wind out of someones sails, or you can counter by firing the jab to break his rythm followed by a hard body kick, or you can also use the inside low kick to good effect as long as you are properly covered, chop out the inside leg and he will have nothing to plant on for his punching. You can also parry his hands and then step in to clinch to break his punching and use knee work from there. Also the obvious circle away and don't back straight up then look for your openings.
     
  5. ChaosKang

    ChaosKang White Belt

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    I personally try not to cover up. Not saying its not needed, but I tend to stop moving around or firing back. Try to either circle out with your hands up, or if you wanna bang, then get in close, keep your head down and let your hands go. Btw don't keep your head too far down or you'll eat a knee.
     
  6. The_Bear

    The_Bear Purple Belt

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    Work hard and a lot on head movement and footowork. It worked wonders for me bro.
     
  7. ASEGSEA

    ASEGSEA Guest

    I learned bobbing and weaving during sparring sessions with people that throw longer combos. Those extra few punches gave me time to be forced I to adapting to the situation, if that makes sense. Sort of like throwing a man to sea to teach him to swim, I suppose.

    /.02
     

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