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Need Advice for joining a BJJ school

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by machine29, May 29, 2008.

  1. machine29 Guest

    I have dabbled in this over the last 3 years or so, but I've never found a school or trained consistently in it.

    I am from a very small town, so basically a bunch of friends and myself would study and roll with one another.

    Ive been living in a bigger city now for a few years and I'd really love to get back into this. I always loved the competition and the science of BJJ.

    I still remember a lot of basic things but I am slow at it and not very good *obviously since not training consistently.*

    I know of a few schools where I live, but I am kind of shy and dont really feel confident because I dont know what to expect.

    So I want to ask the vets on here a question:

    How do u view a new student when they come in and what can they do to gain your respect?

    I feel a little intimidated to be honest walking into a place with such hardcore experienced practicioners and I want to learn and become part of the team.

    I have really good people skills, Im very respectful, I have good natural strength and great cardio.

    so any advice on how to go about finding somewhere, and what I should do once I check it out and possibly join?
     
  2. Slithers Green Belt

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    I am no vet, but I'll comment anyways.

    I was shy when I was checking out different school, too. I just wanted it to be 6 months later already so that I could skip the introductory process. In fact, for the first while, I was known as the tall, quiet guy. But I eventually learned that the great thing about BJJ is that you can have the 'hardcore experienced practitioners' on the same mat as the sunday morning hobbyist roller. It is one of the only sports where you can train with the elite professionals as a 'nobody.' At first it seems intimidating, but really it is a blessing in disguise. These guys are human, too, and know what you are going through. 9 times out of 10 all it takes to gain respect is to give your 100% (without being a spaz). To me I look for guys with a 'willingness to learn.' Guys who listen will get more advice, obviously.

    Find the closest place that you feel good about. Try out the free class and meet the people. Only you can say if it is right for you. Sometimes a great competitor is not a great teacher. Sometimes a great teacher is not a great competitor and sometimes not even a black belt. Once you join, don't try to take anyone's head off but give it your all and you should be good. Most of all have fun.

    Good luck
     
  3. slideyfoot Artemis BJJ Co-Founder

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    Fairly simple: turn up regularly to training, don't be a spaz on the mat. If you've got a good attitude and stay consistent, you'll soon feel like a part of the team.

    Obvious point, but make sure you check their schedule, and see if it fits with your lifestyle (e.g., not much use if you're always at work when they run classes).

    Most important thing I've found is that there is a good range of people to train with: different sizes, ages, skill levels etc.

    Also take a look at their competition record: if they always do well at tournaments, then that's a good sign the instructor produces decent students.
     
  4. codemonkey76 Black Belt

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    As long as you are polite, humble, have good higiene and turn up on time, then people will accept you.
     
  5. machine29 Guest

    thanks a lot guys

    So its the kind of deal where most people will want you to succeed and wont take it as an insult if u tap them?

    I always loved training partners in anything that geniunely care about your progress and success.

    If I did do good and somehow submitted someone who had been goin a long time, I just dont want bad vibes or something like that.

    Im going to do a search of places and do like you guys said and visit each one and see what they are like.

    I am not a fighter, I just love the self defense aspect and just the comraderie and exercise/discipline aspects.
     
  6. SMillard Red Belt

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    The only people that typically get ass hurt about getting tapped are newbies that think they are hot shit. Some people that have been at the school for awhile might be like that, but odds are that person is generally a tool and not liked by most at the school. So don't worry about that guy.

    As said previously, show up, consistently try to improve your game (not just tap everyone all the time), practice good hygiene, try not to teabag anyone (don't ask) and things will work themselves out. Friends should be a secondary thing, don't try too hard to be everyone's buddy, focus on your training and helping your training partners and you will be as cool as Fonzie.
     
  7. beatenup Banned Banned

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    just don't get mad when someone completely dominates you or accidentally bumps you in the face or something on the mat and you will be fine
     
  8. machine29 Guest

    I definitely dont mind being dominated as long as I am learning afterwards what I can do to not be dominated.

    I dont mind being kicked or hit or roughed up.

    So u guys are saying, If i ge really good at armbarring someone, I should work on other things and not go for that every single time?
     
  9. beatenup Banned Banned

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    yeah nobody likes a crybaby.

    and if you are really good at armbarring someone then keep doing it till you master it. master the arm bar and master the transitions that sprout from the arm bar and master the arm bar from all angles and positions from the guard from on top and from sideways. that is the path you want to take...
     
  10. SLaKKJaW Blue Belt

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    GOOD BJJ'ers are, in general, a different breed. To be good, you have to be humble. That's pretty much rule number one. By that, I mean you have to be able to set your ego aside when you're learning. Sounds like you've got that down already. Keep a good attitude. Always be open to learning from the people that visit.

    When I'm rolling with new guys, I like guys who don't quit. If you're in bad position, ALWAYS fight for better position. You cheat yourself if you ever quit to position.

    If you're in a choke and you're not hurting (or not hurting too bad), fight out of it! New guys tend to tap instantly to stuff like that. Don't. Don't go out or anything, but you have to toughen up to play jiu-jitsu. You have to learn how to control that panic you get when you're getting no air in your lungs. There's no shame in tapping. It's the name of the game. But you might surprise yourself.

    This doesn't apply so much to joint locks. Don't play with your limbs or anyone else's when you're rolling.Work out as much as you can, but save the risky stuff for competition. Likewise, don't wrench someone's appendage when you're applying a submission. That shit hurts and you don't want to injure your training partners. You're a team, after all.

    Be CLEAN! Finger and toenails trimmed. Clean gear. I shower before and after class. When I get home, I hang my wet clothes/gear up on stuff so it can dry (on fans, chairs, railings, wtf ever) so that it doesn't sit in a ball and get that musty smell that never seems to wash out.

    Don't stick with one move or one position. If you get good at one thing, use it less and less often to expand your game. Don't just stick with your A-Game. Make all of jiu-jitsu your A-Game. It sucks when I teach a guy new things and all he wants to do is what has worked for him before. The problem is, it stops working as soon as you use it on someone who knows the defense for it.

    And when you drill, drill the move like you're using it. I hate seeing guys so anxious to roll that they're drilling sloppy to conserve their gas. Drill right, roll right. And your gas-tank just gets bigger with work, anyway.
    I'm sure I'll think of more, but for now just show up, work hard, learn well.
     
  11. Miss Click White Belt

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    Yup, what everyone has said. I just started at a new school a week ago because I moved and I already feel a part of the team. If you show up often and try your best everyone will respect you. Don't be shy about going, both of my schools have been full of friendly people and everyone's trying to help each other.
     
  12. Wrestleben Brown Belt

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    One thing is CERTAIN. You will kick yourself that you didn't join the gym sooner.

    Get your balls out of your purse and GO! I wish I would have joined by gym 6 months earlier.
     
  13. machine29 Guest

    Thanks alot everyone.

    I wanted to join before this thread and u all have kicked my ass and motivated me even more to join.

    I have to go out of town for 2 weeks, but once i get back, I am going to compile a list of all the places and go visit.

    once again, much respect to everyone in this thread for taking the time to help a noob thats interested.
     
  14. Defy Unforgiven

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    exactly.


    I just recently started training and felt the same way you're talking about. Once you get past the first couple classes and people see you're not a complete fucktard and giving it your best, you'll fit right in.

    Just get thru the first couple weeks and train hard!
     
  15. slideyfoot Artemis BJJ Co-Founder

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    If they're sensible, then no, they shouldn't take it as an insult. Tapping in training means fuck all: when in class, you should focus on technique instead. Everybody gets tapped sometimes, so its stupid to dwell on it - if you happen to tap someone, no big deal, and the same if you get tapped. All that matters is improving your technique: you will get tapped along the way. As has been said in the past, "if you're not tapping, you're not learning".

    There is a really excellent thread on the topic, here. I read that before I started training, and it pretty much shaped my approach ever since.
     
  16. B3rserk3R Brown Belt

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    I really liked that thread too. The pick up game anology is priceless and I try to keep it at the forefront of my mind whenever I'm getting whole heartedly dominated.
     
  17. FLMikeATT Purple Belt

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    dude, the teabag is a really good offensive position. The kimura and armbar is right there for the taking.

    nothing wrong with that. sure it sucks being under it, but it gives you a good incentive to escape. after all, no one likes nuts on their face.
     
  18. SMillard Red Belt

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    The reason I mention it is I was at a Rigan Machado seminar and my partner was a Plantation cop. He was showing us triangles from the mount and this cop swings his leg in behind my head and I get a eye full of nuts and taint on my lips (thank god I had my mouth closed). I bridged really quick and since he was so high up on me and basing on my face he came off real easy. Rigan Machado only saw me bridge him off so he comes over and says "you did something wrong, let me see you try the triangle again from the mount" I tell Rigan "no, it's alright I know what he did wrong, we don't need to do it again" Rigan had a puzzled look on his face and said alright and walked away.
     
  19. SMillard Red Belt

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    FLMike, where in PSL is the ATT school? I might be working in Ft. Pierce for a couple of months starting in July.
     
  20. ahcshon Purple Belt

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    tell people you want to be an ultimate fighter. That is the best way to make friends and get peoples respect
     

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