Neanderthal No More Timeline Question?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Chaseg1520, Aug 20, 2015.

  1. Chaseg1520

    Chaseg1520 Green Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Messages:
    1,187
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Marion, OH
    I have been working to address a lot of postural problems that always halt my gains a few weeks/months into consistent lifting. My next step is to try the NNM program. The program is in two steps: a 4 week more "corrective" cycle followed by a 3 week more "typical" cycle.

    My question is, if we really want to focus on strengthening the muscles that are hypotonic and loosening the hypertonic muscles then I don't see how 7 weeks will do it properly. Would it be bad to repeat this routine until a full APT correction has been made? Any advice here would be appreciated.

    TL,DR: can the NNM program be done longer than programmed for?
     
  2. ripskater

    ripskater Guest

    I wouldn't see why you couldn't continue the program longer than it's stated for. Especially if it's helping you maintain posture, and strengthenin weaknesses.
     
  3. SteveX

    SteveX Nobody F*cks Wit Da Jesus

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2005
    Messages:
    6,533
    Likes Received:
    68
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    I'd say that there's nothing wrong with running two cycles of the program back to back. It really just depends on your goals.

    I will say you may be surprised how effective focusing in on a specific goal for 7 weeks can be and you may find that at 7 weeks while all your postural issues may not be completely resolved, they may improved enough that they don't necessarily have the be the entire focus of your lifting routine.
     
  4. Tosa

    Tosa Red Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    9,068
    Likes Received:
    242
    Location:
    Somewhere else
    A lot of corrective work is neurological, so the benefits can occur really rapidly, especially if you do the corrective work consistently and frequently. Even if actually structural adaptations are necessary, if it's an area that is chronically undertrained, then it should respond really well once properly targeted.

    That said, there is nothing wrong with repeating the program if you think it will benefit you. Or, perhaps keeping note of what exercises you find really beneficial, and what sorts of things you want to continue to work on, and have that in whatever program you do next.
     
  5. Chaseg1520

    Chaseg1520 Green Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Messages:
    1,187
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Marion, OH
    Thanks guys. Appreciate it!
     
  6. DrBdan

    DrBdan Something clever

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    Messages:
    12,090
    Likes Received:
    964
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
  7. DrBdan

    DrBdan Something clever

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    Messages:
    12,090
    Likes Received:
    964
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    What sort of intensity should I be using for this program? I assume that I should be focusing on the the quality of the movements so the reps should be somewhat challenging but nowhere near failure.
     
  8. Tosa

    Tosa Red Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Messages:
    9,068
    Likes Received:
    242
    Location:
    Somewhere else
    Some of the exercises you could push harder before quality is sacrificed. For example, it lists chest supported t-bar row, that's not an exercise where you'd expect much form break down if it's a weight you can still handle for the full ROM.

    Since the program is done in four week blocks, I'd say use loads you can see yourself adding to in the next four weeks. Keeping in mind that since many of the exercises are probably new, or ones you haven't trained in a long time, there should be noticeable improvement in just four weeks.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.