moves you don't think should be illegal

JerseyTrash

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I can understand certain moves being illegal, like heel hooks on the lower level, but I'm sure there's plenty that everyone thinks are bullshit. I haven't heard any stories of calf or bicep splicers really messing anyone up, so I'd vote for those.
 
One of my instructors snapped someone's arm with a bicep slicer in competition. In fact, I think he is the reason they are illegal. I don't really see how they are more dangerous than an armbar, though.

I think the rules are pretty good as is, but I wouldnt mind seeing the calf/bicep slicer/crushes allowed.
 
um wasn't there recently a thread about how mikey t. got his arm fucked up with a bicep slicer (i know it's not what shattered his arm, but he wrote that it's what set up the arm to fail when it did break.). from what i understand the bicep slicer is deceptive. as in there's some pressure and then snap something in your arm gives.
 
many people think (or used to think) that slicers are just 'pain' submissions, but there is a lot of torque and you can definitely break stuff. People think they can ride it out, take the pain...then snap!
 
i think at lower levels, heel hooks and can openers should be restricted, but at higher levels, i don't think any submission moves should be made illegal.
 
In judo any subs arent allowed in juniors and I totally agree. Not only for safety but it also makes them much better at controlling the top position and as such gives them a much better foundation for when the subs are allowed.

As for some that should be legal, maybe the guillotine, but only in the guard, Id hate to see guy do it standing and the jump into guard with it in a judo match, that would bother me.
 
Sharpshooter, camel-clutch, death-valley-driver...
Are frog-splashes legal??
 
scissor take down...

I think its called "kani basami" in judo-ese, and from what I understand that technique has been illegal in competition for some time.

The only move that I think should be legal at lower levels are toeholds. I love toeholds and use them all the time though (mostly because you can hit them from almost anywhere and I'm all about constantly threatening my opponent) so maybe I'm biased.
 
Do you mean in gi or no gi

I think the rules to what you are allowed to do are fine as they are. I think it may be fustrating for guys who do predominantly no gi to switch to the gi, then to realise that many submission options are no longer available to them.

Perhaps the only thing I may change is the rules on the gi grips. I think any gi grip should be allowed.

Its been awhile since I last did judo, so I can't remember if its true that if you grip the gi, you are only allowed a certain amount of time before you have to let go or does that rule only apply to gripping the belt?
 
isnt an 'excessively violent takedown' illegal? So, if you fucking own someone with a harai-goshi or something, you could get point deducted?
 
isnt an 'excessively violent takedown' illegal? So, if you fucking own someone with a harai-goshi or something, you could get point deducted?

I thinks thats true. One of the guys from my old gym was a Russian who kept doing a double leg, picked his opponent up high and slammed him. The ref let it go for the first three times because he didn't think the Russian could understand him. When he did it for the fourth time he was disqualified.

East Europeans can be tough but Russians go to extremes. The friend of that other Russian jumped and yanked on a heel hook in a gi lesson which broke something in my foot. It didn't heal for months.

Another type of slam you are not allowed to do is jump backwards when someone has your back. Such as when Marcelo had Ricco Rodrigues back.
 
The "bitch" choke. Or putting a "C" grip on a guys throat (I'm not talking about poking your thumb in their trachea). Especially no gi, its a great set up for moves from the mount.
 
That would be called strangling.
 
In judo any subs arent allowed in juniors and I totally agree. Not only for safety but it also makes them much better at controlling the top position and as such gives them a much better foundation for when the subs are allowed.

As for some that should be legal, maybe the guillotine, but only in the guard, Id hate to see guy do it standing and the jump into guard with it in a judo match, that would bother me.

Interesting, here in the UK the main governing body, the bja, has banned subs for juniors. My club is a bja club but there are many aja (smaller affiliated governing body) clubs in my area to, so our juniors enter aja competitions. Aja juniors are allowed to use subs and do in contest. Our juniors often lose because the make mistakes on the ground they can get away with when no subs are allowed. I have noticed this with many juniors comming up to the adults class to. Some of them almost give me my back whilst trying to pass my guard or dont defend there turtle very well.
 
In judo any subs arent allowed in juniors and I totally agree. Not only for safety but it also makes them much better at controlling the top position and as such gives them a much better foundation for when the subs are allowed.

As for some that should be legal, maybe the guillotine, but only in the guard, Id hate to see guy do it standing and the jump into guard with it in a judo match, that would bother me.

My understanding is that a guillotine itself isn't illegal, if you don't extend out, stretching the spine as many BJJ guys do(extending the spine out like that is called do-jime, and is forbidden). Frodo showed me a method of applying the guillotine by curling in your abs, like you're doing a crunch, that I believe should be judo legal (no spine extension).
 
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