MMA vs Boxing, which to pursue?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Eli1015, Dec 23, 2016.

  1. Eli1015

    Eli1015 Martial Artist

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    I need some advice. I'm 23. I love combat sports and have been training off and on since I was 17 in MMA, Boxing, and Karate. I'm currently spending about 5 days a week at a boxing gym training trying to get my boxing up. My question is, witch in your opinions would be a better career path to follow? Which is easier to become a pro at? Make more money at? I love both but probably favor mma more. My plan is to have a few amy boxing fights, then some MMA fights. Is that a good plan?
     
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  2. Hagelslag2

    Hagelslag2 Brown Belt

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    If you think you like MMA more, do MMA. If you want to become the best you could possibly be, you have to be able to do whatever is necessary. That's easiest if you really, really like what you're doing.
     
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  3. Canned Tuna

    Canned Tuna Red Belt

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    Whichever you are better at for a career

    Whichever you enjoy more for a hobby

    This is obvious, right?
     
  4. Eli1015

    Eli1015 Martial Artist

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    Thanks I'm definitely a better MMA guy than boxing. I have been practicing since I was like 14 throwing perfect spinning hook kicks, back kicks, etc. My style is very similiar to conor or wonderboy. But my question is more career based. Witch would be easier to become a successful pro at? I know boxers usually have alot more amature fights than mma fighters.
     
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  5. Hagelslag2

    Hagelslag2 Brown Belt

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    Definitely MMA. It's a smaller sport.
     
  6. Jimmy Jazz

    Jimmy Jazz Red Belt

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    Karate is super cool man! I would go with mma so you didnt put all that work in for nothing. A guy with good hands and kicks can go a long way like conor or wonderboy has shown.
     
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  7. DoctorTaco

    DoctorTaco Breadhead

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    Which ever you pursue, learn about training others, running a gym, teaching classes, fitness, nutrition. Learn about physiology, cornering fights, taping hands, stopping cuts, organizing events, how to hustle sponsors.

    Not everyone makes it as a fighter alone. There's a wealth of knowledge available if you keep your eyes and ears open, ask questions and pay attention.
     
  8. MadSquabbles500

    MadSquabbles500 Steel Belt

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    Boxers make more money.
     
  9. Reyesnuthugr

    Reyesnuthugr Dominick Reyes Belt

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    I feel like boxing would give you the greatest edge/return in MMA, as it's most competitors' greatest weakness, and thereby the best area to exploit. The reason it is their greatest weakness is, imo, because it is the most subtle and therefore most tricky/difficult art to pick up. It's the hardest to "see" what's going on, and when you're good at it you can gauge wide open opportunities that others have little to no idea are even there presenting themselves.

    Wrestling is really awesome too, but training defensive wrestling is a lot easier and quicker, apparently, than "defensive boxing," which- you pretty much just have to be good/great @ all around boxing to be good at "defensive boxing." Defending against boxing is the most difficult task for boxers themselves. *Wrestling is good at foiling pure boxing, but if both guys are decently versed in wrestling, it cancels out (in MMA), despite a significant skill differential, and goes to the guy with slightly better (or much better) boxing.

    I know this post is awkwardly worded (I just read it to myself) but I think you see what I'm saying. I think dedicating yourself to boxing (only) for a period of time until you are impressing your coach with it would be the biggest payoff for you going into MMA (OR boxing).

    That's just what I think. I really think boxing is so unique to other martial arts in that it's less about learning several moves and more about execution of those few moves, polishing only 4 punches (sometimes 3) to a high luster and figuring, building a clever solid structure around it (subtle movement and angles), it becomes so illusive that people who haven't done it can't tell what's going on so the reasons for its effectiveness stays hidden, even right there out in the open, even during slo-motion replay from several angles.


    Anyways, do what you feel like, in your own timeframe and sequence. Think it out, don't get antsy or feel pressured by others. Too many people are tempted by the ethereal promises of glory floating around their head, glory from false pre-conceptions they have picked up from media and various ignorant half-informed sources. Study it out, go with your gut, think out the cleverest/most optimal way for YOU, and do it your way. Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2016
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  10. Canned Tuna

    Canned Tuna Red Belt

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    Which would be easier to become successful in is entirely dependent on which you're better at. Winning is how you succeed. You win by being good.

    Good luck conor jr
     
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  11. Eli1015

    Eli1015 Martial Artist

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    Very well thought out and lots of great advice here. I really appreciate the time you took to help out a aspiring fighter. Thank you.
     
  12. Eli1015

    Eli1015 Martial Artist

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    And to everyone who replied with advice, I appreciate it alot.
     
  13. Universal Kombat

    Universal Kombat Blue Belt

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    Just to be clear, I do boxing and have even uploaded some sparring videos of my boxing gym on here, so not bashing on boxing, that being said...

    If he trains boxing to the point he becomes as good as you're saying. He's gonna still have to spend a long time training in grappling, years, to be competitive if he wants to join mma afterwards. Guys like McGregor don't just train takedown defense, they work on offensive grappling of their own. Just like in boxing, no one just learns bobbing and weaving without learning how to throw a punch, understanding how punches and combos work, will help you understand how to better defend them, same applies to grappling.

    You'd be surprised to see how many of MMA's touted strikers, actually have a grappling background to them.

    Boxing doesn't translate that well in MMA in my opinion, unless you're a swarmer or slugger. If your style of boxing is the traditional boxer, you're gonna get a lot technical boxing shut down in MMA due to kicking, knees, and clinching.

    As a slugger or swarmer though, or a smaller shorter fighter who is forced to fight on the inside most of the time, boxing will help immensely. In MMA I think boxing works best for the slugger type of boxer.

    Of course what I said isn't definitive but it seems to follow the general rule from my observations.

    Taller rangier fighters in MMA will try to keep you at bay with their longest weapons, jabs and kicks. If you're an out boxer you'd be good enough to still fight him from the outside if he was just boxing too, the issue is he is throwing kicks and then timing knees when you come in.

    As a slugger/swarmer, past a certain point the kicks won't be an issue. But knees and elbows can still throw you off your game. It depends who you're fighting really. Styles make fights, but in MMA boxing is a whole lot less effective.

    Guys like the Diaz Bros, Fedor (back then in his prime), Frankie Edgar, BJ Penn, etc all benefited from their boxing.
     
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  14. Reyesnuthugr

    Reyesnuthugr Dominick Reyes Belt

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    Sweet breakdown, very enjoyable read.

    Agreed, aggressive style pressure boxing would transition more seamlessly to MMA.

    If he becomes a defensive boxer, he will have to spend more time and be willing to learn strategic defense and workarounds against kicks and elbows and grappling, etc. (he'll still see openings to time and knock the **** outta unwitting competitors at weird moments, who aren't used to decent level boxing even at the highest levels of MMA), but I don't think it's impossible to learn those things in MMA, it just takes some study, regardless. Either way, he will need to learn crosstraining in the facets of MMA before going headlong into MMA competition, so as long as he's not delirious thinking his main art is enough by itself (which is never true), and looks and adjusts and learns according to his results in sparring and amateur fights, shouldn't be an actual problem.

    It DOES come down to the individual person, and their style, etc.-- that factors in majorly. Boxing and wrestling just seem to be the largest payoffs and most dominant traits to have as your main areas of study in MMA and provide most of the hardest frustrations for the opponent to get around, assuming the other areas are not neglected.

    It would be advantageous for TS to think and train at all ranges in boxing, regardless of the style that he finds he's naturally good at. Being good at countering and pressuring opponents (all while being defensively sound) should be a smart thing to prioritize while learning boxing. Even if you don't become an aggressive stylist in there, I still think it will pay off massively in MMA at least until you get to the highest levels. Great hands and movement are the scariest thing to go against and have to work around for almost all MMA competitors these days.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2016
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  15. Prez ebrmc

    Prez ebrmc White Belt

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    Wouldn't be that crazy to explore both.
    Mma might be more money soon.
     
  16. Uchi Mata

    Uchi Mata Preaching the gospel of heel hooks and left kicks

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    I don't think it's hard to become a pro at either. Local promoters will often give you pro fights if you ask for them, especially if you have a decent ammy background. I think MMA is probably a little easier to make decent money at because of the organizational structure, but the top end in boxing is $$$ that no MMA fighter except maybe MacGregor has seen.

    If you have the opportunity to do so, try to be a part of a pro-camp for one fight in each, and see what appeals to you more. Camp will make anyone hate their chosen combat sport, so try to see which you hate less doing it for 4-5 hours a day for 6 weeks in a row.

    I will add that as a guy with decent standup abilities the path to making money in MMA is probably faster than if you were a good grappler. Everyone loves someone who can stand and bang, and guys with real striking chops are fairly rare in low level MMA. You could get noticed fast, but you could also get put on your back and pounded to shit by a D1 guy as soon as you make it to even a AAA league like WSOF or LFA. How does the notion of spending 2 hours a day just working on getting back to your feet and defending takedowns strike you?
     

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