Military Roll Call! Veterans, GTFIH!

Discussion in 'The War Room' started by Thai Domi, Jun 16, 2016.

  1. Phr3121

    Phr3121 Red Belt Platinum Member

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    ?
    Yeah, a U.S. Air Force base named after a U.S. Army officer. Lieutenant Colonel William Dyess. Check it out...
    [​IMG]
    Also:
    "Dyess' first active combat unit was the 341st Bombardment Wing, which activated on 1 September 1955. The 341st was part of the Strategic Air Command (SAC), flying the B-47 Stratojet, which it continued to operate until its inactivation on 25 June 1961."

    "...initial responsibility for constructing the 12 Atlas F silos fell on the Corps of Engineers Fort Worth District. The Fort Worth District also received responsibility for the nationwide procurement of the Atlas F's propellant loading system. Construction at Dyess proved to be an exception in that the project was completed on time. As construction continued, the Air Force activated the 578th Strategic Missile Squadron on July 1, 1961. Becoming operational in 1962, the 578th and its 12 missiles were all placed on alert status during the Cuban missile crisis."
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2019
  2. LGM-30

    LGM-30 Black Belt

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    That was the 60’s dude. Nuke were fucking everywhere. Today, not so much.
     
  3. LGM-30

    LGM-30 Black Belt

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    That’s an interesting picture though. I wonder if that during a launch or if that’s how the missile sits. If the missile is operational like that then what’s the need for the doors?
    And usually, at least with the minuteman, the hot launch gas and smoke come up from the launch tube before the shroud and third stage are above grade. Unless they had cold launch back then, like when the peacekeeper was launched. But I don’t think so.
    Cold launch was genius. We should have kept the PK (MK).
     
  4. Strychnine

    Strychnine Steel Belt

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    I don't know if this has been posted before but if you're a veteran with an honorable, you can still shop at AAFES online.

    https://www.shopmyexchange.com/veterans

    I don't work for AAFES, but with the holiday shopping season around the corner, it's a way to save some scratch.

    But wait, there's more!!!

    There's an organization that gives tickets to veterans called Vet Tix. You can check them out here.

    https://www.vettix.org/
     
  5. Phr3121

    Phr3121 Red Belt Platinum Member

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    Indeed. I know that is the case with the U.S. Army.
    Where do you think those Dyess B-1 bombers will be loaded with a nuclear weapon if the time comes?
    Ok, I see what you are trying to say (I think). You are saying the U.S. Air Force no longer uses nuclear bombs. Well, that is not true, they can still use the B83 on their B-1 and B-2 bombers. We may not want to fire a missile that will 'set off' the Russians. It is a nice option to have and these things are a 'dandy' at 1.2 megatons (thermonuclear). I believe the Israelis also have these bombs ready to be fitted on their fighters - not bombers.
    [​IMG]
    The following aircraft are capable of launching an attack using the B83 bomb:
    . B-52 Stratofortress
    . B-1A Lancer
    . B-2 Spirit
    . FB-111
    . F-15E Strike Eagle
    . F-16 Fighting Falcon
    . F/A-18 Hornet
    . AV-8B Harrier II
    . F-22 Raptor
     
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  6. LGM-30

    LGM-30 Black Belt

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    Good looking out @Strychnine

    I got a Star Card in 2004?? Maybe? Just to buy an XBox. Being that it was my first purchase I got 15% off. I was pretty pumped.
     
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  7. LGM-30

    LGM-30 Black Belt

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    The B-1 is only conventional. The B-2 can be loaded with both. As far as the other aircraft listed I don’t know.
    The B-1 wouldn’t survive an attack on Russian targets as a nuke only aircraft. At least that was the thinking in the 70’s. It’s better as a conventional dropping aircraft.
    The B-2 can drop both. So can the B-52. But the survivability of those aircraft in a hostile environment like Russia, China or even Iran is dim.
    I know the USAF has nukes. I use to work on them.
     
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  8. LGM-30

    LGM-30 Black Belt

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    Carrying the B-83 made aircraft more susceptible to being shot down in the environments listed above. It isn’t a standoff weapon like a cruise Missile is. Per the INF, which is pretty much dead lol, we couldnt make ALCM with ranges greater than 310 miles, up about 3,000 miles. So that’s why we are stuck with these ALCM with about a 300 mile range. So the aircraft isn’t over target like it would be if it was dropping a strict gravity bomb. But with Russia outfitting diffident players with anti aircraft sites (s-400), it increasingly makes that 300 mile range obsolete.
     
  9. LGM-30

    LGM-30 Black Belt

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    That’s why we have a triad.

    Lol, I guess.
     
  10. Phr3121

    Phr3121 Red Belt Platinum Member

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    Well, you would know being U.S. Air Force. So, does Dyess Air Force base have nukes or not?
    Where does the U.S. Air Force store its GBU-57 Massive Ordnance Penetrator?
    [​IMG]
     
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  11. LGM-30

    LGM-30 Black Belt

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  12. Phr3121

    Phr3121 Red Belt Platinum Member

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    Interesting.
    I'm surprised. I thought this information would be classified.
    New Mexico tops the list:
    . 2,485 - Kirtland Underground Munitions and Maintenance Storage Complex (KUMMSC), occasionally at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories.
     
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  13. LGM-30

    LGM-30 Black Belt

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    I’m not really sure where they store that massive penetrator. That’s kinda ridiculous lol
     
  14. LGM-30

    LGM-30 Black Belt

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    The guys who complied that data and info, Kristensen and Korda, are awesome follows on Twitter if ya do that sort of thing. It’s pretty amazing what they and others, like out in Monterey Ca, can do with GIS software, google earth and other public platforms to gather this data on launches, numbers and general awareness pertaining to nukes.
     
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  15. Phr3121

    Phr3121 Red Belt Platinum Member

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    I'm not so sure this is a good thing for the U.S. government. They are literally letting the whole world know where the U.S. stockpiles its nuclear weapons. I still think this information should be classified.
     
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  16. LGM-30

    LGM-30 Black Belt

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    I’m sure it is. I think the numbers they put in their reports are really educated guesses. I’m sure FOIA requests and looking back at historical docs also play a big role. There is also the element of holding your government accountable or using this info to ask great questions to govt officials.
    But I don’t think it’s that much of a big deal as to where they are located ,most of if not all those places get inspected, for as long as New START is in place, every 18 months or so. And we do the same to them.
     
  17. LGM-30

    LGM-30 Black Belt

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  18. Phr3121

    Phr3121 Red Belt Platinum Member

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    Well, it is a layer of security that just went out the window. Isn't Edward Snowden in trouble with the U.S. government for leaking classified information? There are things people don't need to know for the security of the country, that is why the information is classified. 'Black Budget' projects are approved by congress yearly and the representatives don't really have a clue as to what they are approving money for. 'Need-to-know' basis, and they don't need to know. FOIA does not include classified information. I'm sure the security at the Kirtland Underground Munitions and Maintenance Storage Complex is 'tight', but I don't really see a need to advertise its location and what they keep there.
     
  19. Phr3121

    Phr3121 Red Belt Platinum Member

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  20. Phr3121

    Phr3121 Red Belt Platinum Member

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    @Hail to the Redskins
    1958 Tybee Island mid-air collision. An incident on February 5, 1958, in which the U.S. Air Force lost a 7,600-pound Mark 15 nuclear bomb in the waters off Tybee Island near Savanah, Georgia. Yield: 3.8 megatons. Not recovered.
    [​IMG]
    We have been able to make these weapons small enough to fit a few in one missile (the primary charge is an atom bomb - amazing):
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2019
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