Mental State: Win...Win...Win...

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by 879lexus, Oct 15, 2010.

  1. 879lexus

    879lexus Blue Belt

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    How do MMA fighters and Olympic contenders and in fact everyone that competes in anything professional get that strong mental win/win drive?

    How do they get 'want it so bad' attitude? Is it part of their personality or built in genetics? I really LOVE BJJ and want to get that strong win/win mental drive and get the confidence and mental drive to win.... (I may not have the physical part, but I just want to develop the psychological aspect of winning)....

    What psychologically separates professional competitors from normal practicioners?
     
  2. Sloth

    Sloth Brown Belt

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    There are a number of really good sports psychology books out there exploring this subject. In a nutshell, pretty much every sports psychology book I've read breaks down like this:

    -be committed
    -set clear goals
    -come up with a plan to achieve those goals
    -want to achieve those goals very,very badly
    -set up your life in such a way as to be congruent with achieving those goals
    -achieve those goals at whatever cost your commitment is willing to pay
    -have a support team to keep you motivated and to help you achieve

    I think the "want it so bad" attitude has a lot to do with finding meaning in your chosen sport. If you want a mundials gold, but ultimately realize that it doesn't mean that much to you then it's very very difficult to want it so bad. There has to be meaning behind it. You want the mundial gold to add success to your school so you can support your children better, or so that you can make a career out of Bjj to get out of the shitty neighborhood you live in, or to prove to yourself and your friends that you are the best in the world right now, or whatever. You might want something really bad right now, but if it's meaningless to you, then it's unlikely that you will stick to the committed path that you need to be on to achieve it. For example, when I was 25 I really really wanted to be the best Bjj guy at every belt level out of everyone thatI came across and to win every tournament that I entered. Over time, I found that my commitment to competition would waver with injury, or fatigue, or burnout and training became a lot less fun for me. It became clear to me that my goal to win everything and become the best Bjj guy around was not really that meaningful to me. What has been meaningful and motivating for me consistently over the course of my training is the puzzle of Bjj and finding effortless technique in a safe and health improving way. Those are the things that make me train when I don't feel like it, study video when I would rather be reading the new Dexter book and sometimes compete when I would much rather not.

    Hope that makes sense, I tend to ramble a bit sometimes :)
     
  3. KILL KILL

    KILL KILL Gold Belt

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    fear and doubt are the mind killers. erase those and success is yours. easier said than done though
     
  4. 879lexus

    879lexus Blue Belt

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    Nice write up...very interesting. I find when I even roll with people in class, for that brief 5 seconds before you roll, I find that alot of shit goes through my mind. I size the guy up and if he look stronger than me, I get doubtful and if he look intidimating I pull myself back even further mentally. And at the point that we start rolling, I have so convinced my mind that I can't hang with the other dude, that he starts getting subs and passing..... I KNOW if i get rid of this fear and doubt as the other poster says, I would do much better rolling. I want to point out that it's not ego, it's just having that supreme confidence in myself to go out and win...... Mentally before every roll, I just convince myself that I am not good enough yet....
     
  5. brianX

    brianX Green Belt

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    I actually disagree with this. Some of the most competitive people I've known--true killers--were vomiting-level anxious before competition. Cael Sanderson once said that he feared losing more than he loved winning, and I think that's about right for many highly competitive people. They just can't stand the idea that somebody could beat them, and they'll do anything to prevent it.
     
  6. sanchezero

    sanchezero Green Belt

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  7. MMA junkie

    MMA junkie Purple Belt

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    Motivation is different for everyone. I set goals and train my butt off. I mean I really pick up the pace, train more often, and clean up my diet. Knowing I worked so hard, it personally gives me confidence. When I sacrifice something (diet/time/social life) I don't even want to think about losing. I think some of it can be just how we are wired, because I have been competitive since I was a little kid. However, you can always motivate yourself further.

    That said, never give up, never surrender.

    edit: ^ I love that gif lmao
     
  8. Doctor Venture

    Doctor Venture Black Belt

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    I think it comes down to, you either want it or you don't. I couldn't tell you why I'm so hungry for a win in a Judo match, other than that I want something to show for all my hard work. I've never felt motivated like I do when I am in the gym at anything else.

    I know guys who train as much or more than I do, and they don't even compete. And not just the older guys, guys my age in their prime. I think it just comes down to the individuals attitude.
     
  9. SuperSuperRambo

    SuperSuperRambo Senior Moderator Senior Moderator

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    Or take Rickson as another example: "I am afraid of everything."

    I think it's personality.
     

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