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Maximizing training experience

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by xB252x, Aug 31, 2010.

  1. xB252x

    xB252x White Belt

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    I'm new to the forums and I am looking for some advice about the pathway I should take with regard to my training. Just a little background information, I took Krav Maga for about a year and a half (I would consider that exposure, but not training), I'm only 5'4, 135 pounds, and, because I can't guarantee that I will have the time to train after I graduate from college, I am only assuming that I will have 4 years max to train.

    Currently, I am enrolled in a BJJ school on an 18 month contract. Originally, I planned to train as much as I could in BJJ, switch to Judo for a year and a half, then finish out the year training in Muay Thai. However, I began to second guess this strategy and was wondering if other paths would be better. For example, would it be best to just train strictly BJJ all 4 years, or some other combination?

    I am not planning on becoming an MMA fighter, but would like to comfortably defend myself and be able to look my opponent in the face the next day (something that I wouldn't be able to do with Krav). My initial thoughts about switching was because I figured it would give me adequate exposure to all combat ranges: MT for striking, Judo for clinch/takedowns, and BJJ for groundfighting. I was also a little bit leery of using BJJ in a street fight, given I'd most likely be fighting on a concrete surface.

    Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.

    P.S. Although I'd commit the money if necessary, the fact the Judo and MT schools are a whole lot less is a big plus.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2010
  2. nohuff

    nohuff White Belt

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    I believe Judo or BJJ would work fine for your goals. Both will teach you how to defend yourself without maiming your opponent. You won't focus as much on takedowns in BJJ, but you will learn plenty for dealing with your average thug. Those takedowns can be modified for concrete surfaces and your top control should be good enough to keep him on the concrete. Just don't pull guard on da streetz...

    That being said... I would say the best thing to do in a self defense situation is to avoid it alltogether or simply carry a weapon. If it is some kind of non-self defense agro situation... just suck up your pride and let it go. The laws in the US don't exactly favor fights that could be avoided.
     
  3. bora y

    bora y Purple Belt

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    i wouldn't switch over entirely, as such a small amount of time could end up giving back very little, where as 4 years of training would make you pretty solid.
    i'd recommend bjj, but when my father asked me what my 13 y/o brother should take to make him more strong/balanced/etc, i told him to take judo. both are good choices, mix them if you can
     
  4. xB252x

    xB252x White Belt

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    Yeah, I'd ideally like to take as much as I can, but the cost and time factor don't really allow me to do it. When you suggested that I mix them, did you mean take bjj and judo simultaneously?
     

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