Limited time on the mat...

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by mike p, Jun 18, 2008.

  1. mike p

    mike p Blue Belt

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    So I've been doing the standup game for a while now, but I'd like to start taking some more BJJ classes at my local gym. I've rolled maybe 30 or 40 times in my 28 years on this planet. I am almost a complete newbie when it comes to grappling. It is, however, a lot of fun when I get the chance. Unfortunately I will only be able to dedicate myself to Fridays and Saturdays as my work and school schedules don't work with my gym's BJJ schedule.

    My question is, How much can I hope to learn in only these two days a week?

    What should I do to get the most out of my limited time?

    Like I said, it's a lot of fun for me. And keep in mind, I'm in the gym 6 days a week, just not a lot of time for grappling...
     
  2. KickBoxer23

    KickBoxer23 Blue Belt

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    2 days is obviously better than none (or 1) but it's still not ALOT. I recommend keeping a journal of what you learn each class and how to do that technique. Try to stay late and either roll or drill drill drill. You can never drill enough.
     
  3. mike p

    mike p Blue Belt

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    Excellent idea about the journal. Thanks.
     
  4. slideyfoot

    slideyfoot Artemis BJJ Co-Founder

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    Yeah, I normally only train two days a week, and have found keeping a training log has definitely helped make the most out of that limited time. If you can't have quantity, make sure you get quality: you need to be especially focused when the instructor is showing technique, and make good use of your sparring time (i.e., using your log to decide exactly what you need to work on, note down your progress each session, look for tips from training partners as often as possible).

    Also, getting a good training partner will be of massive importance. If you can find someone willing to help you with your game, who will give you advice after rolling and during drilling (e.g., hand placement, weight distribution, grip choice etc), make sure to train with them as often as possible.
     

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