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Kyukushin/Judo

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by thaiking, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. georgejjr Black Belt

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    I'd say wrestling is better (in general, there are exceptions of course) for MMA takedowns than judo, simply because of the specialization of gi work in judo. If you live in a northern climate where people wear jackets most of the year (10 months every year up where I live) judo is more practical for self defense, because everyone wears jackets (if you fight someone not wearing a jacket just stall a couple of minutes until they freeze, then slide their frozen body to the curb). If you do combat sambo, where people wear a gi, judo is more practical. But MMA is done without jackets, and wrestling takedowns are specialized for that. I think GR is more useful than freestyle for MMA, if you're going to get specific, but that is just my opinion, you hear people arguing both ways on that - though there's really no reason not to learn both GR and freestyle for MMA.

    However, not being able to pull guard isn't a disadvantage in judo ... pulling guard is pretty easy to avoid - how often do you see it in MMA nowadays? For that matter, you're not allowed to pull guard in wrestling either, which doesn't seem to be an issue in wrestling's usefulness in MMA.

    Don't know much about kyokushin, other than the guys I've met who do it are pretty tough - like in any full out combat sport (boxing, bjj, judo, wrestling etc) if you don't have a reasonable pain tolerance you don't do it.

    MT/BJJ is missing takedowns for MMA, it has to be supplemented with either wrestling or judo ... and if you think that BJJ has enough takedowns without wrestling/judo, you could also argue that judo has enough submissions without BJJ. Neither argument holds in most cases (yes, there are exceptions like Fedor, who's great at submissions with zero BJJ).
     
  2. TsukinoKage Purple Belt

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    "Pure Kyokushin" except they started working out with Muay Thai and boxing trainers when they fought in K-1, LOL.
     
  3. TheDevil'sOwn White Belt

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    I train Kyokushin and I've always wanted to train Judo. I think its a good combo.
     
  4. IChinaManI Green Belt

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    judo is the shit.
     
  5. Ryo Black Belt

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    Um... yea... they were fighting in kickboxing matches.. in a ring, with 10oz boxing gloves on, and a whole different time set. Who in the world would go into a totally different enviroment without first learning a thing or two about it? It didn't mean they didn't already know how to strike. Karate is a huge part of kickboxing. Not only in it's huge historical influence on kickboxing and k-1 its self. But also on the many great fighters it's produced. There's a reason why fighters like Semmy, Hug, Feitosa and Filho still wore there gi's to the ring. And there's a reason why the Karate flag is still flown in the great Dutch kickboxing gyms in The Netherlands. It's certainly not because they think it's so much more inferior to Muay Thai or Boxing.
     
  6. Chonbody Guest

    It sounds dope. I think people forget MMA is still a new and young sport, so blending of styles" is still a process that needs to be discovered, I think the possibilities are endless if not interesting.
     
  7. Chonbody Guest

     
  8. NinjaKilla187 Blue Belt

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    Congratulations Oversensitivity Contest Winner!!!!

    Oriental (meaning Eastern) is to Occidental (meaning Western) as Asian is to Caucasian.

    Therefore Oriental is correctly applied to things cultural in nature such as art, history, languages, martial arts, etc. "Asian" is correctly only applied to Asian people, just as white people are correctly called "Caucasian" and not "Occidental".

    Anything else is just retarded Left-Coast Politically Correct Victim Politics. If you chose to be offended by the term "Oriental Martial Arts", that's your business, but it makes you nothing less than a whiny little bitch.
     
  9. Brent Schermerhorn Green Belt Professional Fighter

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    ready, ready? I have found the potion to make everything else inferior..
    WR (game control), BJJ (ground), MT (clinch, knees etc..), KK (kicks), Judo (throws), greco roman (stand control), boxing (hands, head) ok...AGAIN..magic formula
    Im a GENIUS
     
  10. ssckp86 Orange Belt

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    Congratulations Either:
    1. Prideless Submissive-Asian Contest Winner
    or
    2. Ignorant I-Take-Things-Literally-Without-Considering-What-Connotations-A-Word-Has Contest Winner

    "Oriental" has a history of derogatory useage.
    Your dumbass didnt even notice that the ignorant TS used "oriental" in a mocking fashion.

    ON TOPIC: Why is this still going??? Its about the athlete and not the martial art....Judo and Kyokushin have NOTHING to prove. Its been tried and tested.
     
  11. Bosozoku Orange Belt

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    You might want to brush up on the founder of K-1, his history, his fighters, and his reason for creating the promotion.

    K-1 was pretty much built to showcase karate, under an open rule set that didn't favor karate...

    In an odd way kyokushin fighters are kind of the Gracie's of stand-up: They have always sought to test their stand-up style against other standup styles. But they have done it by the rules of others. There is a long history of KK fighters traveling to Thailand, China, etc, and fighting under local rules. They've had good results and bad results, naturally, but should be applauded for the effort. KK fighters have won fights in Lumpinii stadium. Who's traveling to Japan to challenge KK under KK rules?

    Anyone who dismisses any of these styles is a fight theoretician with limited sparring experience. I've been abused by boxers in America, KK fighters in Tokyo, MT fighters in Bangkok. Dumped by judo men, slammed by wrestlers and twisted by BJJers. I've yet to encounter a style that has not filled me with dread with some aspect of their mastery.

    The secret of MMA is to be a master at what you do, and at least respectable at everything else.
     
  12. YeahBee Samdog Original Nine

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    when watching the Bluming documentary on google video I noticed that they do alotta grab the leg/kick into throws kinda thing

    Seems to be prevailant in Hapkido aswell (from fight science and Human Weapon)

    Is this jsut an unpractical weapon when it coems to MMA? youj very rarely see it

    I love grabbing the leg when an opponent attempts a footsweep, a Ouchi or osoto gari Gari with a leg pickup (and possible makikomi) is a devastating throw

    And what about attacking the leg if you caught it? KArate Kid style you know :) you never see that
     
  13. Balto Silver Belt

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    Grabbing the leg and throwing is a great technique.

    However, it is rare to see it in MMA because most of the fighters are aware of the danger of this. They tend to limit themselves to mostly leg kicks which are almost impossible to catch. When they do throw a mid to high level kick, they try to set it up for when the opponent is vulnerable and unable to catch it.

    I have seen MMA matches though where one fighter will throw a head kick that gets caught on the opponent's shoulder somewhat. The result is that the fighter loses his balance and gets taken down, which is basically the technique you are describing. So I think you do see it in MMA on high level kicks.
     
  14. Q mystic Silver Belt

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    Sometimes it looks like they tried to trap it, the way their arms are, and end up getting ko'd tho. I wouldn't wanna try to catch one and would rather get outta the way.:)
     
  15. IChinaManI Green Belt

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    Crocop/Fedor anyone?
     
  16. CanadianMMAFann White Belt

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    Comments like this are so annoying.... You don't think people can list off every successful MT fighter? So why do people like you think a martial art is dominant because a handfull of good fighters.
     
  17. CanadianMMAFann White Belt

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    Some of the best fighters in the world came from BJJ, MT, Kung Fu.
     
  18. Ryo Black Belt

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    Yea so? What's your point? Those are all proven, effective arts. I was merely pointing out that the same thing is true for Judo and Karate. Since it's been proven by actions and not theory.
     
  19. The_Bear Purple Belt

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    nice little combo... similar to muay thai/bjj. I am not one of those new mma trainers or fans who thinks that 1 year of muay thai will make you an ultimate striker. Long term study of Karate, specifically Kyokushin, have produced excellent strikers.... GSP, Liddell, Machida, Rutten, Fihlo, Hug
     
  20. batah White Belt

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    Long term study of MT will make you a good striker too
     

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