Kosoto Gake

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by primaxopt, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. primaxopt

    primaxopt Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2008
    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    0
    Does anyone have a good instructional video for this or any tips? I'm not sure what it's called in wrestling but I'll be happy to look at that too.

    I'd like a solid backward throw to work on. I usually do kouchi makikomi which is effective but risky for BJJ.

    Thanks!
     
  2. jujijimmy

    jujijimmy Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Messages:
    888
    Likes Received:
    1
    i use tani otoshi alot, pretty easy throw to learn and is a good counter throw.
     
  3. waza

    waza White Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    0
  4. Franklegit

    Franklegit Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2012
    Messages:
    289
    Likes Received:
    44
    Location:
    Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada
    Would you be using this throw in a BJJ or Judo setting?
     
  5. primaxopt

    primaxopt Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2008
    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    0
    BJJ.

    Thanks for the responses. I've seen those vids. Just not sure why there aren't any instructionals on this like there is for any other takedown. I think quite a few people here have this as their go-to throw - please feel free to chime in.

     
  6. Einarr

    Einarr Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2011
    Messages:
    6,610
    Likes Received:
    40
    Location:
    Osoto Gari'ing your mom.
    Andre Galvao does Ko Uchi Gake a lot, which is a similar mechanic and principle to Ko Soto Gake. It's on his latest DVD (but he incorrectly calls it Ko Uchi Gari when what he does is quite clearly a hook not a reap).
     
  7. QingTian

    QingTian Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    2,369
    Likes Received:
    255
    I personally despise kouchi makikomi, so this is where I'm coming from. There are people who are good at that throw, but more often it is used as a crutch for lacking proper timing and coordination for foot techniques. Basically it's a Judo version of a desperate tackle.

    I don't know anything about you, so this is not a slight on your abilities. It is just that the throw is popular because it is a shortcut, so I post as if that is the case here.

    In general ashiwaza is a matter of coordination, timing, and awareness of your opponent. It looks simple but actually because there is little room for error, it is considered very difficult and skillful to do. In short, it really is a matter of experience, and not really something I can type out or offer a video. The way is really to just try many kinds of ashiwaza until something clicks. The main thing is to learn how to use your hands well to open up opportunities, because realistic nobody just steps into it. And even if they did they'd step off of your attack, if it was just your foot. And even if they did step stupidly into position, you likely wouldn't react in time to sweep. So the focus needs to be on recognizing and creating the opportunity, which takes time to learn. The actual throw is simple compared to a major throw.

    That said, kosoto gake is like other ashiwaza where you have to load your opponents weight on one leg and take it out. Then, then difference between gari, gake, and harai is simply how your foot works. In the case of gake, it's like weeding, where you grab the weed by the stem base and uproot it.

    The key is to plant your uke's weight on that leg so that he is the weed, then hook and uproot. Thus a big part of the work is actually in your hands, not in the footwork. Using the lapel, try to rest your weight on uke, then uproot. Even better if you can snap the lapel forward before coming in, to use uke's reaction.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.