Ken Primoa on US wrestling mentality vs Russian Mentailty

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by nefti, Oct 23, 2010.

  1. nefti

    nefti Red Belt

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  2. nefti

    nefti Red Belt

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    i actually heard the same thing from an olympic wrestler from korea. That Russian practices are more light hearted (granted not before tournaments) and they experiment and do more of a "jiu jitsu approach" to their sparring there.
     
  3. jkidd89

    jkidd89 Orange Belt

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    I thought the Russians were better due to their extensive focus on Freestyle wrestling. While in the US, we focus more on Folkstyle for high school wrestling and Collegiate wrestling.

    I am no expert though, so I'd like people to explain if I've said something wrong.
     
  4. newerest

    newerest Purple Belt

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    I thought this was the reason as well...
     
  5. SuperSuperRambo

    SuperSuperRambo Senior Moderator Senior Moderator

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    The Russians are better due to their more extensive focus on wrestling in general.
     
  6. Sloth

    Sloth Brown Belt

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    I don't know much about wrestling, but I agree with his statements in the context of grappling and most other sports/activities. Hell, I think it's true of life in general.
     
  7. nefti

    nefti Red Belt

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    A korean Olypian who has medaled in international events told me that when he trained in russia what got made an impression on him was how they trained and their approach to training. He used come by and spar with us and he mentioned how jiu jitsu sparring was like how the russians trained wrestling. Not about winning and going 110% all the time but about exploring and perfecting technique. Now i understand the nature of wrestling is going to be naturally more intense than jiu jitsu but it seems that the russians have a different view about practice than americans.
     
  8. outonbail

    outonbail Living My Dreams

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    russian don't train technique. they only spar , going from mid to high lvl intensity.

    they learn the technique while sparring
     
  9. norcal313

    norcal313 Purple Belt

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    I don't know if I agree or disagree with everything said here, but I do know that from 1904-2004, the USA has a total of 108 Olympic medals for Freestyle Wrestling, almost double the next highest nation's medal count (Soviet Union with 56, while Russia has 15 due to limited years competing as a new nation).

    Just something to think about.
     
  10. AgonyandIrony

    AgonyandIrony Gold Belt

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    Yeah I saw that and just thought "Lets compare medals"

    Absurd statement.
     
  11. nefti

    nefti Red Belt

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    yea but can you say that about the say last 50 years?
     
  12. the MUSCLESHARK

    the MUSCLESHARK Orange Belt

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    i have a olympic alternate wrestling coach, who says that the russians have the best teqnique period. we now at the olympic training center have a russian head coach. The reason that russians are so much better than americans, is because they use there head as there first line of defense. if you cant get through the head you cant get to the legs. there philosophy is just the most adapted.
     
  13. fourfif**

    fourfif** Banned Banned

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    I completely agree. That's why I loved watching the Abas brothers wrestle (they're not russian obviously, but its that style I think), is why B. Satiev is my favorite wrestler of all time, and why (as an adult) I tailored my entire wrestling game around the russian two on one. I've always thought this as well. They are are all about technique! They practice economy of motion as well.


    Edit: Thanks for the post!! Great videos mayne. Thumbs up.
     
  14. KILL KILL

    KILL KILL Gold Belt

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    I use the russian 2 on one a great deal. I actually taught it to a guy I trained bjj with and it helped him out extensively on his feet. The entire Russian wrestling style is different than what we've adapted here in the US.
     
  15. Explosion Man

    Explosion Man Blue Belt

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    Americans especially wrestlers have this must win at all costs in training to protect my ego mindset. Russians know they are badasses.
     
  16. joe90210

    joe90210 Blue Belt

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    hmm so the badass tough guy wrestling mindset that all the wrestlers on here brag about is what's costing them the wins?
     
  17. boboplata***

    boboplata*** Banned Banned

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    i agree with this approach as well.
     
  18. Rod1

    Rod1 Titanium Belt

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    Lovely way to avoid the topic, why don't we go from 1952 (first soviet participation) to 1988 (last soviet participation).
     
  19. Carrera26

    Carrera26 Orange Belt

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    I know I learn a whole lot more when I dial back the intensity and just try to go technical, don't see why that wouldn't work everywhere. This fits in very well with what I know about Russian/Eastern European athletic training as well. They obviously work very very hard, but they took a more objective look at things and concentrate on working smart.
     
  20. DynamoJudoSambo

    DynamoJudoSambo White Belt

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    I cannot speak of the wrestling but I do believe I have somewhat of a unique perspective as an American in regards to judo/sambo training in Russia.

    I have trained in Russia and the former Soviet Bloc countries on 14 occasions and I have found that the Russian way of training is rather laid back. That being said everybody is working but the intensity level is alot lower. Injuries are seemingly rare but they do happen.
    For example at my friends Igor Kurinnoy's school "Borec" Igor will demo a technique and then everybody pairs off and works on it. Igor will come around to each pair and evaluate and make adjustments but no one is trying to smash their training partner.

    During the randori (free sparring) sessions at Sambo-70 everybody warms up on their own and then the head coach calls for 5 minute go's. If someone gets in for a throw his training partner just goes with it and takes the fall. This seems to greatly reduce injuries and wear and tear. During these practices you'll also see current and former Olympic and World Team members mentoring the younger/up and coming athletes.

    I'm not saying it's better or worse, it just seems to work for the Russians.
     

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