Jumping guard to set up takedowns?

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by trustdoesntrust, Jul 26, 2016.

  1. trustdoesntrust

    trustdoesntrust Purple Belt

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    Hi all,

    Since it's so hard to pummel into a wrestling clinch in the gi, I've lately been playing with takedown setups that start with my jumping guard and then immediately releasing and pummeling into an over/under or double unders clinch when my opponent catches me. If done right, various trips and lateral drops become available, as my opponent's posture is compromised. I know I've seen Kron Gracie use this attack, and I'm aware of related techniques like the Mendes fake guard pull to ankle pick, but does anybody have any other examples or personal experiences of this setup? Any reason not to pursue this, aside from the injury risks of of guard jumping?
     
  2. RJ Green

    RJ Green Black Belt

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    i hear if you do judo you learn all sorts of gi takedowns.
     
  3. HtomSirveaux

    HtomSirveaux Blue Belt

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    Well yeah, if you jump guard and they remain standing you can pummel under hooks and plant your feet to drive for a trip or whatever, but that seems like a really ass backwards way of game planning for the top position. You don't have to have a body clinch to get someone down, you can shoot from neutral without grips, plenty of stuff from wrestling can be made to work with the jacket, and as the guy above pointed out, there's obviously judo to draw from
     
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  4. trustdoesntrust

    trustdoesntrust Purple Belt

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    To clarify, I am not averse to more conventional takedown strategies, but this is a setup I've been exploring since it incorporates two strong positions for me-- the closed guard, and clinch-based trips. Seems like some other possibilities as well, such as the Kron and Mendes moves I mentioned above.
     
  5. rmongler

    rmongler Black Belt

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    Gui Mendes did the jump > ankle pick a lot.

    Garry Tonon (two r's, one n, that always seemed backwards to me) does a scissor takedown variation into the saddle/411/honeyhole, where your top leg weaves in between their legs instead of just going across their hip.

    If you want to split hairs there is a finish for the single leg that kinda sorta looks like pulling guard, even though it doesn't start as a guard pull obviously. How it works is that you drop and rock back to pull the guy over on top of you so you can then get deep on his hips, the rock forward or to the side so you can finish.
     
  6. HtomSirveaux

    HtomSirveaux Blue Belt

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    Oh sure then. The way the op was worded, it sounded like you wanted to play top game with this as your main way of doing so, which seemed kinda silly. As one component of a strategy based on jumping guard that's great. I'd say your on the right track
     
  7. Zefram Cochrane

    Zefram Cochrane Follow me on Pictogram

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    as well as getting your back taken in the process
    /kidding

    I've never played with this idea, but this jumping guard to td set up seems interesting as long as you have a strong guard game, otherwise sounds risky. The problem is that the whole idea is to get the td it seems that it would be aimed instead at grapplers favoring top position instead of playing from guard.
     

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