Judo Questions (noob)

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Begets, Jan 22, 2006.

  1. Begets

    Begets White Belt

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    1. The name of the club I'm looking at joining is "Bujutsu Judo Club." From my reading, the name "Bujutsu" tells me they're not teaching sport judo, but rather the full skill-set, including chokes and locks. Is that correct? Is there anything else that this name reveals about the style of judo, or their approach to it?

    2. Does the IJF have any regulatory authority over traditional judo, or just sport judo?

    3. I've heard a lot about the "spiritual" aspect of Judo. What does that entail?

    4. What is a reasonable fee-per-session or monthly fee for this type of training? How much does a gi cost?

    5. Anything else I should think of?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Q mystic

    Q mystic Silver Belt

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    Go take a look.
     
  3. papablues1

    papablues1 Blue Belt

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    http://www.judoinfo.com/
    I am new to Judo as well, but this seems to be a really good site for Judo information. I hope it helps.
     
  4. b0b

    b0b Banned Banned

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    1. All Judo contains almost every lock BJJ has, sans leg-locks, even sport Judo. They just don't practice it nearly as much.

    2. Not really sure.

    3. Not many. Basic respect and theory should be taught. Most schools use the traditional Japanese words and sayings.

    4. Most Judo places are non-profit clubs that cost about 40-50 dollars per month. Other schools that aren't clubs will be more. A good gi can cost 40-150 dollars.

    5. Be patient. The first thing you should learn is ukemi, or breakfalls. They hurt, and you won't be able to go to class more than a couple of times per week until you get used to being dropped on your head/neck/back/arms.
     
  5. Begets

    Begets White Belt

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    Good stuff. Thanks for the info guys.
     
  6. judogido

    judogido Aussie!, Aussie!, Aussie! ...

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    Sometimes these sorts of clubs are smaller AND could be uninsured if they are taught by an "independent" instructor who got the sh*ts with "sport judo" & wanted to teach it "the traditional way".

    Just be sure they & you are covered if you train there.
     
  7. zenshin

    zenshin Green Belt

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    just do BJJ
     
  8. Begets

    Begets White Belt

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    Thanks. Your answers are a big help.

    I might do that in the future. I'm not training for MMA matches, so I'd like to have the option to stay standing, while putting an opponent on the floor, as a primary strategy.
     
  9. Thalion

    Thalion Green Belt

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    The name means nothing in general.

    1. The difference between sport and traditional judo is How many time u'll spend in each part.
    A Good Judo club should be near 60-50% Stand up , 40-50% on Ground (It's more difficult to get a good stand up then a good ground game) with some time spent on Kata , that are very important to understand some principles and some jujitsu Technique of Shinzen Shobu (real combat) no longer used in Randori Waza (sport combat).
    Kata are also important to get Shodan if u aren't an Athletes. (Here in italy u have Sport's Dan and Technical's Dan )

    In Sport judo club u will study about 80% stand up 20% ground (mainly controll position of osaekomi waza) and no Kata.

    2. I don't know

    3. Judo is full of principles. It's not only a sport. It's a DO , which means a "moral way" . Judo should make better person (respectfull and self confident). Judoinfo.com is a good source

    4. Here in italy i paid about 30 euro for month. About 35 $ i think.
    A cheap Gi is about 30 $, a good Gi 60-100 $. An excellent Gi 100-400 $.
    Some brands are Mizuno, Toraki, Kusakura, Adidas, Dax Moskito, Mitsuboshi.
     
  10. Resident A-hole

    Resident A-hole Orange Belt

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    1. The name of the club doesn't mena anything. Non-sport judo means that they will teach self-defense aspects in addition to sport judo. They will train things like how to throw a person who punches or grabs you etc. It's good to know how to apply judo in a real situation, assuming you are not aiming for the olympics.

    2. As far as any judo org is concerned, there is no sport/non-sport judo- it's all just judo.

    3. In my opinion: You bow, kneel, & use japanese words for all the moves, really nothing more. I am no better a person for doing any of these things. I am there to train, nothing else.

    4. I pay $45 per 6 weeks of judo, vs $100/month I pay for BJJ. You can find a decent gi like an HCK for about $60, or a real nice one for around $100. There are some more expensive, but those are generally for world class judo players. Stay away from anything cheaper than $60, it will likely be junk & rip easily. I would say look at Atama or HCK for good value. Most gis's dont come w/ a belt, so you'll need that too.

    5. Be prepared to be sore from taking falls. I was in very good shape when I started, & I still had aches all over & a sore neck after every class for a few weeks. Your body will adapt after 3-6 weeks and you'll be able to train as often as you want.
     

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