Japan's Summer of Misery: Heatwave, Flooding, Landslide, Typhoon, and now a 6.7 magnitude Earthquake

Discussion in 'Mayberry Lounge' started by Arkain2K, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    Poor Japan just couldn't catch a break!

    This past June, 22,000 was hospitalized and 65 died from a sweltering heatwave that was declared a natural disaster.

    Then comes July, 200+ people died and 5.9 millions had to evacuate their homes because of major landslides and flooding caused by record rain falls.

    And now this double-whammy of typhoon and earthquake, back-to-back in the same week!

    Here's to hoping they will make it through the year without anymore deadly disasters.

    Powerful typhoon leaves at least 11 dead in Japan, damages major airport
    Hundreds injured as storm knocks out power to more than 400,000 households
    The Associated Press · Sep 04, 2018


    One of Japan's busiest airports remained closed indefinitely after the strongest typhoon to hit Japan in at least 25 years flooded a runway and other facilities while damaging other infrastructure and causing at least 11 deaths as it swept across part of Japan's main island.

    Japan has long had a reputation for transportation that runs like clockwork. But even that couldn't hold up to the fury of Typhoon Jebi, whose 160 km/h winds destroyed buildings, cut off power to more than 400,000 households and left 11 people dead and 470 injured.

    Kansai International Airport officials said Wednesday they weren't sure when the airport will reopen. Although a damaged runway had been mostly cleared, other equipment to ensure safe flying wasn't operating.

    The airport is built on two artificial islands in Osaka Bay, and the high seas flooded one of the runways, cargo storage and other facilities, said the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. One passenger was slightly injured by shards from a window shattered by the storm.

    The closure typhoon is raising worries about the impact on tourist traffic, mostly from China and Southeast Asia, as well as on exporting computer chips and other goods. About 3,000 passengers stranded at the airport overnight were given blankets and biscuits until they gradually left by boats and buses.

    Hideko Senoo, a 51-year-old homemaker who was planning a family trip to India, said the terminal was hot and dark after losing power, and she could not even buy drinks at vending machines after food at convenience stores were all sold out. "We could not use vending machines or access to wireless local network to get information, and we didn't even know about this boat service," she told Kyodo News.

    Another passenger, Miki Yamada, a 25-year-old office worker planning a trip to Thailand with her friend, said she spent the night at an airport cafeteria, Kyodo said. "It was a rather scary night, as we were so isolated."


    30 dead, 9 missing after 6.7 magnitude earthquake hits Japan

    By Haruka Nuga, The Associated Press | September 8, 2018


    Japanese rescue workers and troops searched Saturday for the missing for a third straight day in a northern hamlet buried by landslides from a powerful earthquake in Japan. Power was restored to most households and international flights resumed to the main airport serving the Hokkaido region.

    The Hokkaido government said Saturday that 30 people are dead or presumed dead and nine remain missing. All but three of the victims are in the town of Atsuma, where landslides crushed and buried houses at the foot of steep forested hills that overlook rice fields.

    Toyota Motor Corp. announced that it would suspend nearly all its production in Japan on Monday. Toyota makes transmissions and other parts in Hokkaido and also has suppliers on what is the northernmost of Japan’s four main islands.

    The magnitude 6.7 earthquake that struck about 3 a.m. on Thursday knocked out power to the entire island of 5.4 million people, swamped parts of a neighborhood in the main city of Sapporo in deep mud and triggered destructive landslides.

    Backhoes were removing some of the solidified mud to clear a road in Kiyota ward on the eastern edge of Sapporo. In parts of Kiyota, the earth gave way as it liquefied, tilting homes and leaving manhole covers standing one meter (three feet) in the air. In parking lots, cars were still stuck in mud that reached part way up their wheels.

    The return of electricity came as a huge relief for residents. About half of Hokkaido got power back Friday, and all but 20,000 households had power Saturday morning.

    “It was a relief that it was back yesterday evening, but it feels it took time,” said 66-year-old Sapporo resident Tatsuo Kimura, adding that the blackout was a reminder “of how important electric power is in our life.”

    Tourists from South Korea and China were able to head home from New Chitose Airport, outside of Sapporo. About 1,600 people spent the previous night at the airport, according to Japanese media reports.

    Hokkaido has become a popular destination for tourists from other parts of Asia.

     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2018
  2. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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  3. Teppodama Red Belt

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    The earth shouldn't have done that. It wasn't a nice thing to do.
     
  4. MadSquabbles500 Steel Belt

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    EArth is different culture, hard to judge.
     
  5. Teppodama Red Belt

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    Gaia of Peace.
     
  6. trac209 Red Belt

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    I blame climate change,we should tax those who build a house on dirt or rock after all it’s probably their fault the earth is trying to shake them loose......
     
  7. tramendous Silver Belt

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    Earth quakes are nature's way of keeping Earth flat.
     
  8. Bloody Pulp Gold Belt

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  9. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    Earthquake is probably the only exception here, and it has more to do with Japan's geographical location (See Ring of Fire).

    Increasingly-extreme weather patterns on the other hand, that we have a say.

    Where we choose to build and expand in the future to minimize physical damages and death tolls caused by natural disaster, that we certainly have a say as well.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 9, 2018
  10. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    Definitely something to keep in mind for future projects, as well as the ones we've already built:

    Many Major Airports Are Near Sea Level. A Disaster in Japan Shows What Can Go Wrong.

    By Hiroko Tabuchi | Sept. 7, 2018

    [​IMG]
    Kansai airport, which serves Osaka, Kyoto and Kobe, was inundated this past week when a typhoon hit Japan.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/07/climate/airport-global-warming-kansai.html
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2018
  11. surrealworlds <-----Alexa Vega? Captain?

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    It seems like theres a lot of Earthquakes/Tsunamis/Hurricanes/fires/etc.
    Is there actually more these days or is it just media coverage perception?
    If there are more are they due to anything we can tell like climate change/pollution or are we just fleas being shaken off the planet?
     
  12. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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  13. Madmick Zugzwang Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    I had an incredibly interesting and terrifying discussion with a fish biologist (formally trained as a Paleo Ecologist) about this a few weeks ago. Essentially, he informed me that dams, the new pumps to replace them for big ag, the untimely releases of water preceding this pump system from dams when the water was too warm that ended up killing million of fingerlings (numerous times), river fishing, and of course, the biggest of all, commercial fishing off the coast...are all minor players.

    Global warming is what is killing the salmon. Their dwindling numbers are a sign that there isn't enough food for them when they make it out to the Pacific, and the depreciation of this food chain as it works up to the salmon is being observed most acutely first near its foundation with creatures like the sea urchins who are a critical organism to the health of coral reef systems. The increased CO2 is driving up the Carbonic Acid content of the oceans, and research is now showing that this is killing them off. As they dwindle, so do the fish and other creatures that feed on them which the salmon ultimately feed on, and we tend to care most about the salmon, so that's why we're finally noticing and caring. Cliffs on that research can be found here:
    Warm Sea Urchins on Acid (Feb-18, 2018)
    Know what I find sprawled across the CNN front page the very next day after this conversation? This right here-- one of those coincidences that feels like providence:
    Great Barrier Reef headed for ‘massive death’
    A lot more there, I'm not copying that whole article, since it's a massive feature, but all in here should read it.

    Climate change isn't a lie, and it isn't being exaggerated. It is the single greatest threat our species has ever faced, and I find my mind cynically drawn to the Fermi paradox the more I think about it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2018
  14. HARRISON_3 Gold Belt

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    Damn nature, you scary.
     
  15. TheLinguist You’ve yee’d your last haw Banned

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    I was there in Osaka and Kyoto this summer, the people out and about seemed normal despite all that was going on, will be back there in December hope Mother Nature is finished for a while
     
  16. bad seed Banned Banned

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    I find it ludicrous that people still don't get it. Major low elevation coastal cities will be engulfed by the sea IN OUR LIFETIME- this is not some hypothetical scenario hundreds of years from now. And this is going to trigger the biggest mass migration of humans in earth's history as vast swaths of once habitable zones become unlivable.
     
  17. Ron Mexico Black Belt

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    Meh
    Still not as bad as the summer of 1945
     
  18. Takanori Gomez Yellow Belt

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    I have been living in Japan for quite some time and I have never seen anything like this,it wasnt the first typhoon either,they were coming one after the other.....
     
  19. SSgt Dickweed Red Belt

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    Too soon, brah.
     
  20. Jesus X Hunter eyes

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    tokyo also has a threat from radiation.
     

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