Is there such thing as "Going too hard" in jiu jitsu?

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Digitsu, May 11, 2014.

  1. Digitsu Blue Belt

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    Can one go, "too hard"?

    What would warrant this title, exploding in and out of positions? Accidental knees etc?

    What about if someone is training for competition/competing, can they go too hard? How?
     
  2. 1neeto Blue Belt

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    Always consult with your rolling partner the level of intensity. 100% means 100%.
     
  3. Calibur Jiu Jitsu Snob

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    Going at a pace that is not conducive to your goal. That means if you go at a pace that could hurt your training partner, it's too much. You're killing your chances to get good training in the future.

    I'm pretty liberal, but if you have to say "oops" you're going to fucking hard.
     
  4. magick Green Belt

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    The only thing I would consider as "going too hard" would be not paying attention to what you're actually doing to the other fellow.

    You are sparring. You are not fighting. I've noticed that some people don't quite seem to understand the difference between the two. Heck, I've noticed people not realizing the difference between practice and sparring too. Though that one is more amusing than anything else.
     
  5. Samuel Reynoso Orange Belt

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    When you can't control yourself. As Calibur said, the "oops" rule is a pretty good indicator.
     
  6. Pirat Blue Belt

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    When you're getting savage and lose the edge in technique you go too hard.
     
  7. spiderguardman Banned Banned

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    I think it mostly applies when rolling with people you can dominate.
    If i know i can smash someone then i usually go as light as i possibly can while still staying ahead to make them work and advance my position.
    I usually go for subs but dont always finish them just to keep a flow going.
     
  8. Bjoern White Belt

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    In my school its pretty simple. If you train so hard that you hurt people you are doing wrong. BJJ should be something that nurtures the body and mind and not destroy him on the long run......
     
  9. 1neeto Blue Belt

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    I had my fair share of oops moments, but None of us were going too hard. Got my lip busted once drilling because I moved my head the wrong way. It happens and when it does it's usually a two-way street.
     
  10. brollikk Green Belt

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    This is an easy one:

    If you have a significant strength/weight advantage over your opponent, APPLY THE SUBMISSIONS FUCKING SLOWLY. ESPECIALLY LEG ATTACKS.

    I've seen and been the victim of far too many injuries because bigger people have no fucking clue how easy it is to hurt training partners this way.

    A great example would be when I trained with Ronnie Wuest (balance BJJ Black belt).

    He literally pulled half guard and went for a knee bar 3 seconds after we shook hands. He was so used to applying the knee bar/dog bar from there against big opponents in his gym, he didn't realize the same pressure would cause a SEVERE knee injury for me.



    TL/DR: Even if you are a CURRENT black belt, it is highly likely you may have no idea how easy it is to hurt training partners via submissions (especially lower body ones). As a general rule of thumb, apply the submissions SLOW and give your training partners a huge fucking window of opportunity to tap without getting injured.
     
  11. berimBOWLoh Silver Belt

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    anytime ppl get the best of me they were clearly going too hard.
     
  12. LaBrian Blue Belt

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    If you are trying to win every training session then you are going to hard.
     
  13. Tirofijo2001 Yellow Belt

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    In before Dirtyholt makes a comment about us all being wusses for not going 100% all the time. :icon_chee
     
  14. brendan raedy Blue Belt

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    You are rolling too hard if you could not control yourself, thereby valuing winning a roll more than the health of your training partner. That is never acceptable.

    Other than that, you have to communicate with your partner. Catch here is, both people agree to go 51%, then the other guy starts going 52%, partner responds by going 53%, and then before you know it both people are going all out in what was supposed to be a "light" roll. So you need to talk before a roll, say something during if it gets out of hand, and hammer out any issues after a roll. This is a lot of talk on the front end, but after a couple conversations you should generally have a good relationship with everyone.

    Sometimes stuff just happens, it's a rough sport.
     
  15. EnforcementDroidSeries209 Excellence of execution belt Platinum Member

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    Sure you can "go too hard". I see guys all the time ramping it up, cranking each other's necks and ankles, cranking on subs, and try to fight out of submissions with strength and walk off the mat with messed up necks, joints and ligaments.
     
  16. brendan raedy Blue Belt

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    Well in addition to "going too hard" there is also "waiting too long to tap."
     
  17. Leify Ebb and Flow

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    There's nothing wrong with trying to win all the time. That doesn't mean putting winning above facilitating the health and safety of your training partner; you can do both at the same time.
     
  18. Dogstarman Old man jiu jitsu

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    No. But putting yourself in bad spots and trying to get out of those positions you may end up losing. To improve your game you need to improve on areas where you are weak. If you are always brining your A game you are always improving on what you are good at.

    The point of practice is to improve all aspects of your game.
     
  19. orangeclay Orange Belt

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    I think the question has to do with your goal. If your goal is to compete at a high level than going too hard will be different than if you goal is just to enjoy bjj as a hobby. Also if your goal is to learn a new technique than going too hard means going so hard you can't learn the new technique. I think the answer is that yes you can be going too hard if it is contrary to your reaching your own goal.

    I also think that you can also be going too hard if your intensity is contrary to the goals of your partner. For instance if you want to train to win a major competition and your partner is an older person looking to stay in shape, than what constitutes going too hard will be different. But, I also think this is why it serves everyone well to try to find partners, and gyms, that include plenty of people with shared goals for bjj.
     
  20. brendan raedy Blue Belt

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    Depends on timing.

    6-8 weeks out from your big tournament, you should only be playing A game stuff. Immediately after, you start working on your C game or weak points from your results. Getting closer to the next big tournament, you start trying to bring aspects of your B game to your A game.
     

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