Is muay thai as complex and as hard to learn as BJJ?

Discussion in 'Muay Thai and Kickboxing' started by Gripme, Aug 4, 2015.

  1. Gripme

    Gripme White Belt

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    I took a very watered down American kickboxing class which I didn't get a thing out of. I blame this more on a lousy instructor than the art itself. Other than that I have little experience in striking.

    Then I started taking BJJ and realized that this system was far more intricate and that even after over a year of training I'm still just scratching the surface and barely consider myself a novice.

    I'm interested in Muay Thai, but want to know if it is as complex as BJJ or if one can learn all there is to know of it a lot sooner.
     
  2. wookie brawl

    wookie brawl Brown Belt

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    Muay Thai is simpler to decipher but it takes a lot of time to get good at it. Like BJJ & other things in life, there is no short cuts if you want to be anywhere decent.
     
  3. Gripme

    Gripme White Belt

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    I would assume that the techniques though are simpler compared to a delariva guard to berimbolo you might see in high level bjj.
     
  4. Da Speeit

    Da Speeit CANCEROUS POSTER Platinum Member

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    Muay Thai can't be deciphered imo. There's so much that just doesn't make sense, so many contradicting principles. That's why it's beautiful.
     
  5. Da Speeit

    Da Speeit CANCEROUS POSTER Platinum Member

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    lol please.
     
  6. sereneview

    sereneview White Belt

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    I currently take both and imo being relaxed is HUGE when it comes to both. A lot of my instructors always tell to conserve energy and let the fight come to you so you have time to process, counter, and conquer.

    Muay Thai for me is a fav just because I love to strike and break down my opponent when it comes to jiu jitsu its a very humbling/patient art that needs to be appreciated and absorbed slowly.
     
  7. gameclucks

    gameclucks White Belt

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    Making a pizza only take an hour to learn the basics, same with MuayThai.

    Only a select few that spends years honing their art become masters.
     
  8. Da Speeit

    Da Speeit CANCEROUS POSTER Platinum Member

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    yet 90% of MMA fighters that do Muay Thai 3-5 times a week can't throw a leg kick properly.
     
  9. These Two Hands

    These Two Hands Our revenge will be the laughter of our children

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    In my experience, the beauty of Muay Thai is a relatively small amount of techniques with almost infinite application. You have the benefit of the old cliche about one kick 10,000 times, for example, yet can always discover new ways to time or set that kick up. I've met people who have trained for years and had still never heard of tracking their standing foot when push kicking, for example. When I told/showed them it was a whole new application of an old thing. When I was training regularly you'd get some guy come in from another gym or overseas or something and show you a new way of looking at shit you'd never thought of either, and it's always going to keep happening.

    I find in BJJ there's just so much to learn and cover that's what slows that learning curve down. YMMV.

    As for how fast one can learn, compare that in BJJ four years is barely grasping the basics but after four years of MT I was pretty well versed for an amateur fighter. Also the fact that if you are serious, you can expect to be ready for a novice bout in 3 months of walking in the door compared to entering white belt division in a BJJ comp after 3 months where you'd likely be walked all over.

    Try avoid too much of Modified Thai Rules in the long run though, no elbows/spinning back fists = no fun.
     
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  10. shortlivedglory

    shortlivedglory Orange Belt

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    Knowing a handful of techniques is not the same as perfecting the execution and application of those techniques. While fine tuning of techniques is certainly an aspect of BJJ, it is not central to its practice. Conversely, BJJ has a near infinite number of techniques and chains to set them up. So yes, technically speaking muay thai is less complex. That does not make it easier.
     
  11. AshiharaFan

    AshiharaFan Brown Belt

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    Great post and good answer.
     
  12. Harukaze

    Harukaze Brown Belt

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    Easy to learn, very difficult to master.
     
  13. ebinlol

    ebinlol Banned Banned

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    Muay Thai fighters can't kick properly to begin with, Muay Thai round kick is slower, less acurate, and less powerful than a correctly performed round kick from Kyokushin karate.
    Teeps are uselss too, if you are going to throw a teep you might as well throw an actual front kick.
     
  14. Snubnoze707

    Snubnoze707 High Level

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    Can we start banning people for idiotic posts like this mods?
     
  15. ebinlol

    ebinlol Banned Banned

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    Instead of whining to the mods how about you provide a counter argument on how I'm wrong?
     
  16. Snubnoze707

    Snubnoze707 High Level

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  17. Paradigm

    Paradigm Gold Belt

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    weak, compared to Kyokushin, bro.
     
  18. ebinlol

    ebinlol Banned Banned

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    How is that any sort of argument? Which K1 fighters were thai fighters? Stan Longindis got trashed by Andy Hug, the dutch style was based on kyokushin, the arguable GOAT Semmy Schilt's background was a kyokushin offshoot. K1 Max doesn't count.
     
  19. Hagelslag2

    Hagelslag2 Brown Belt

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    The fact that you admitted in another thread that you have no formal kickboxing training disqualifies you from making the assessments you're making. Any fighter or practitioner who has trained in both styles can tell you how effective Thai kicking is.

    Why would you disqualify anything other than HWs from the discussion? Especially considering most MT fighters fight at lower weight classes this seems very odd.
     
  20. TonyK

    TonyK Brown Belt

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    Muay Thai is like playing bass - easy to learn, hard to get good at.
     

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