International Indonesia To Move Capital City to Borneo, as Crowded and Polluted Jakarta Sinks Into The Ground

Discussion in 'The War Room' started by Arkain2K, Aug 26, 2019.

  1. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    Indonesia will build its new capital city in Borneo as Jakarta sinks into the Java Sea
    Rob Picheta, CNN • Published 26th August 2019​

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    A jungle-draped area on the east of Borneo island is set to be transformed into Indonesia's new capital city, President Joko Widodo announced Monday, amid concerns over the sustainability of its congested and rapidly sinking political center Jakarta.

    The proposed location, near the relatively underdeveloped cities of Balikpapan and Samarinda, is a far cry from the crowded powerhouse which has served as Indonesia's financial heart since 1949 -- and Widodo acknowledged that moving the country's capital to the island will be a mammoth and expensive undertaking.

    But Jakarta's rapid expansion in recent years has presented myriad environmental, economic and safety concerns, prompting the government to look elsewhere and ease the strain on the massive metropolis.

    "As a large nation that has been independent for 74 years, Indonesia has never chosen its own capital," Widodo said in a televised speech, AFP reported. "The burden Jakarta is holding right now is too heavy as the center of governance, business, finance, trade and services."

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    Floating houses on Mahakam river in Samarinda, near the site of the new capital.

    The ambitious project to move the capital will likely cost around 486 trillion rupiah ($34 billion), CNN Indonesia reported, and officials have previously said the relocation could take around 10 years.
    Jakarta is home to more than 10 million people, according to the United Nations, with an estimated 30 million in the greater metropolitan area -- making it one of the world's most overpopulated urban regions.

    It's also one of the fastest-sinking cities on earth, according to the World Economic Forum, dropping into the Java Sea at an alarming rate due to over-extraction of groundwater.

    The city sits on swampy ground and hugs the sea to the north, making it especially prone to flooding.

    A worsening air pollution crisis, exacerbated by near-constant traffic congestion on its roads, has grown so dire that some residents sued the Indonesian government in July.

    No name has been given for the new site, but the government originally announced plans to relocate the capital in April. The move requires parliamentary approval to be given the go-ahead.

    Indonesia owns the majority of Borneo, the world's third-largest island, with Malaysia and Brunei each holding parts of its northern region. The island is covered in vast rainforests, but has been hit by rampant deforestation in recent years.

    https://www.cnn.com/travel/amp/indonesia-new-capital-borneo-jakarta-scli-intl/index.html
     
  2. NoDak

    NoDak Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    Yup, Yup. Crazy.

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  3. JDragon

    JDragon #StayTheFuckHome Platinum Member

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    So because they fucked up with Jakarta, they will eliminate the rainforests of Borneo for the new capital.

    This will go well
     
  4. trident

    trident Water Belt

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    Are they taking the 10 million people with them or just the political body?
     
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  5. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    The rest of the people in Jakarta might want to contemplate about moving, cause the whole place probably gonna sinks below sea level in 10 years.

     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2019
  6. avenue94

    avenue94 Blue Belt

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    Just the political instruments and whatever politicians and civil servants need to go. Although presumably, if it's pulled off, people will naturally want to move the capital.
     
  7. trident

    trident Water Belt

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    Want and capable of are two different concepts
     
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  8. ocfightfan

    ocfightfan Gold Belt

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    Joko Widodo sounds like the name of the manager of the Mos Eisley cantina.
     
  9. HockeyBjj

    HockeyBjj Putting on the foil

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    The symbolism here is off the charts

    Government fucked up the capitol so bad, they're using tax money to build themselves a new one, and leave alllll the common people behind in the sinking city
     
  10. irish_thug

    irish_thug Meme Mod Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Jakarta = Atlantis?
     
  11. Ruprecht

    Ruprecht Hands Of The Judges Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    It's an interesting conflict. Of course Jakarta can't sustain more growth, with it's over reliance on the aquifer and the spreading urbanisation preventing it from being replenished. They are still prediciting a population of 35.6 million for greater Jakarta by 2030 (it's over 30 now).
    However the policies of decentralisation (which have been in place for the last couple of decades) have largely failed to date due to the increases in corruption from decentralised regional authorities. I'm not sure how exactly they could remain competitive while trying to decentralise both the political hub and the economy.
    Not to mention the squeeze from the rising ocean.
     
  12. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    No cataclysm is required for Jakarta to sink into the ground, I'm afraid.

    They basically built a mega city on top of a coastal marshland, 97% of the surface is now paved with asphalt and concrete, then proceeds to drain every drop of the water table beneath for daily use.

    As a result, it's sinking at a rate of 25 cm each and every year, with the sea being held back by a leaky wall.


    Jakarta Is Sinking So Fast, It Could End Up Underwater

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    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/12/21/world/asia/jakarta-sinking-climate.html
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2019
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  13. avenue94

    avenue94 Blue Belt

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    That's very true. This capital probably falls in the same category. And I'm pretty skeptical of the price tag, even accounting for cheaper labor and materials in Indonesia.
    Has decentralization failed though?

    Indonesia falls into the same category as me as India: borderline ungovernable for various reasons/a country that probably shouldn't be a country. At this point, I'd call still being one country, let alone a legit democracy that isn't suffering as much of a slide back as India or th Philippines huge win. Toss in the steady growth without hitting only some of the road bumps, not all, that come with political/economic development and separatist civil wars being kept sort of under control and I'd say Indonesia falls firmly in the success column so far.
     
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  14. Sohei

    Sohei Its just a flu bro!

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    Indonesia seesm to be one of the most if not the most successful Islamic country in terms of combating radicalism.

    Although I hear Santa hats really pissed off a lot of people there....<Lmaoo><Lmaoo><Lmaoo>
     
  15. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    Jakarta, the fastest-sinking city in the world
    By Mayuri Mei Lin & Rafki Hidayat BBC Indonesian

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    The Indonesian capital of Jakarta is home to 10 million people but it is also one of the fastest-sinking cities in the world. If this goes unchecked, parts of the megacity could be entirely submerged by 2050, say researchers. Is it too late?

    It sits on swampy land, the Java Sea lapping against it, and 13 rivers running through it. So it shouldn't be a surprise that flooding is frequent in Jakarta and, according to experts, it is getting worse. But it's not just about freak floods, this massive city is literally disappearing into the ground.

    "The potential for Jakarta to be submerged isn't a laughing matter," says Heri Andreas, who has studied Jakarta's land subsidence for the past 20 years at the Bandung Institute of Technology.

    "If we look at our models, by 2050 about 95% of North Jakarta will be submerged."

    It's already happening - North Jakarta has sunk 2.5m in 10 years and is continuing to sink by as much as 25cm a year in some parts, which is more than double the global average for coastal megacities.

    Jakarta is sinking by an average of 1-15cm a year and almost half the city now sits below sea level.

    The impact is immediately apparent in North Jakarta.

    In the district of Muara Baru, an entire office building lies abandoned. It once housed a fishing company but the first-floor veranda is the only functional part left.

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    The ground floor of this abandoned office building is now underground


    The submerged ground floor is full of stagnant floodwater. The land around it is higher so the water has nowhere to go. Buildings that are so deeply sunk are rarely abandoned like this, because most of the time the owners will try to fix, rebuild and find short-term remedies for the issue. But what they can't do is stop the soil sucking this part of the city down.

    An open air fish market is just a five-minute drive away.

    "The walkways are like waves, curving up and down, people can trip and fall," says Ridwan, a Muara Baru resident who often visits the fish market. As the water levels underground are being depleted, the very ground market-goers walk on is sinking and shifting, creating an uneven and unstable surface.

    "Year after year, the ground has just kept sinking," he said, just one of many inhabitants of this quarter alarmed at what is happening to the neighbourhood.

    North Jakarta has historically been a port city and even today it houses one of Indonesia's busiest sea ports, Tanjung Priok. Its strategic location where the Ciliwung river flows into the Java Sea was one of the reasons why Dutch colonists chose to make it their bustling hub in the 17th Century.

    Today 1.8 million people live in the municipality, a curious mixture of fading port businesses, poor coastal communities and a substantial population of wealthy Chinese Indonesians.

    Fortuna Sophia lives in a luxurious villa with a sea view. The sinking of her home is not immediately visible but she says cracks appear in the walls and pillars every six months.

    "We just have to keep fixing it," she says, standing beside her swimming pool with her private dock just a few metres away. "The maintenance men say the cracks are caused by the shifting of the ground."

    She's lived here for four years but it has already flooded several times: "The seawater flows in and covers the swimming pool entirely. We have to move all our furniture up to the first floor."

    But the impact on the small homes right by the sea is magnified. Residents who once had a sea view now see only a dull grey dyke, built and rebuilt in a valiant attempt to keep seawater out.

    "Every year the tide gets about 5cm higher," Mahardi, a fisherman, said.

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    None of this has deterred the property developers. More and more luxury apartments dot the North Jakarta skyline regardless of the risks. The head of the advisory council for Indonesia's Association of Housing Development, Eddy Ganefo, says he has urged the government to halt further development here. But, he says, "so long as we can sell apartments, development will continue".

    The rest of Jakarta is also sinking, albeit at a slower rate. In West Jakarta, the ground is sinking by as much as 15cm annually, by 10cm annually in the east, 2cm in Central Jakarta and just 1cm in South Jakarta.

    Coastal cities across the world are affected because of rising sea levels caused by climate change. Increased sea levels occur because of thermal expansion - the water expanding because of extra heat - and the melting of polar ice. The speed at which Jakarta is sinking is alarming experts.

    It may seem surprising but there are few complaints from Jakartans because for residents here the subsidence is just one among a myriad of infrastructure challenges they have to deal with daily.

    And that is part of the story of why this is happening.

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    North Jakarta is sinking by about 25cm every year


    The dramatic rate at which Jakarta is sinking is partly down to the excessive extraction of groundwater for use as drinking water, for bathing and other everyday purposes by city dwellers. Piped water isn't reliable or available in most areas so people have no choice but to resort to pumping water from the aquifers deep underground.

    But when groundwater is pumped out, the land above it sinks as if it is sitting on a deflating balloon - and this leads to land subsidence.

    The situation is exacerbated by lax regulation allowing just about anyone, from individual homeowners to massive shopping mall operators, to carry out their own groundwater extractions.

    "Everyone has a right, from residents to industries, to use groundwater so long as this is regulated," says Heri Andreas. The problem is that they take more than what is allowed.

    People say they have no choice when the authorities are unable to meet their water needs and experts confirm that water management authorities can only meet 40% of Jakarta's demand for water.

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    Most of Jakarta's residents rely on groundwater


    A landlord in central Jakarta, known only as Hendri, runs a dormitory-like block called a kos-kosan and has been pumping his own groundwater for 10 years to supply tenants. He is one of many on his street who do this.

    "It's better to use our own groundwater rather than relying on the authorities. A kos-kosan like this needs a lot of water."

    The local government has only recently admitted it has a problem with illegal groundwater extraction.

    In May, the Jakarta city authority inspected 80 buildings in Central Jakarta's Jalan Thamrin, a road lined with skyscrapers, shopping malls and hotels. It found that 56 buildings had their own groundwater pump and 33 were extracting water illegally.

    Jakarta's Governor Anies Baswedan says everyone should have a licence, which will enable the authorities to measure how much groundwater is being extracted. Those without a licence will have their building-worthiness certificate revoked, as would other businesses in the same building.

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    The sea wall is meant to mitigate the city's severe flooding

    Authorities are also hoping that the Great Garuda, a 32km outer sea wall being built across Jakarta Bay along with 17 artificial islands, will help rescue the sinking city - at a cost of about $40bn.

    It's being supported by the Dutch and South Korean governments and creates an artificial lagoon in which water levels can be lowered to allow the city's rivers to drain. It will help with the flooding which is an issue when the rains come.

    But three Dutch non-profit groups released a report in 2017 which cast doubt on whether the sea wall and artificial islands could solve Jakarta's subsidence problem.

    Jan Jaap Brinkman, a hydrologist with the Dutch water research institute Deltares, argues it can only ever be an interim measure. He says it will only buy Jakarta an extra 20-30 years to stop the long-term subsidence.

    "There is only one solution and everybody knows the solution," he says.

    That would be to halt all groundwater extraction and solely rely on other sources of water, such as rain or river water or piped water from man-made reservoirs. He says Jakarta must do this by 2050 to avoid major subsidence.

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    Alternative water sources like the Citarum river are extremely polluted


    It is not a message that is being taken to heart yet and Jakarta's Governor Anies Baswedan thinks a less drastic measure will do.

    He says people should be able to extract groundwater legally as long as they replace it using something called the biopori method.

    This involves digging a hole, 10cm in diameter and 100cm deep, into the ground to allow water to be reabsorbed into the soil.

    Critics say this scheme would only replace water at a superficial level, whereas in Jakarta water is often pumped out from several hundred metres below ground level.

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    Houses once overlooking the ocean now face a dyke


    There is technology to replace groundwater deep at its source but it's extremely expensive. Tokyo used this method, known as artificial recharge, when it faced severe land subsidence 50 years ago. The government also restricted groundwater extraction and businesses were required to use reclaimed water. Land subsidence subsequently halted.

    But Jakarta needs alternative water sources for that to work. Heri Andreas, from Bandung Institute of Technology, says it could take up to 10 years to clean up the rivers, dams and lakes to allow water to be piped anywhere or used as a replacement for the aquifers deep underground.

    Jakarta's residents adopt a somewhat fatalistic attitude to their future in this sinking city.

    "Living here is a risk," says Sophia Fortuna in her home. "The people here have all accepted that risk."

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-44636934
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2019
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  16. dissectingaorticaneurysm

    dissectingaorticaneurysm Red Belt

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  17. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    Speaking of which, I remember Survivor held a season in Borneo for the picturesque landscape there.

    Such a pity that island gonna turn into shit in a few years.

     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2019
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  18. 7437

    7437 Gold Belt

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    Thry obvious cant do that.

    I'm guessing it will be like a shitty venice.
     
  19. Ruprecht

    Ruprecht Hands Of The Judges Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Well decentralisation didn't prevent East Timor from separating, and it was the Tsunami more than decentralisation that stopped the Aceh independence movement. It's done absolutely nothing for West Papua.
    In terms of effects it has had, the marked increase in corruption (and it's not as if it was good in the '80s/'90s) exacerbates what I'd say is the leading political and economic issue. Followed by the apparent backsliding on secularism and the increase in deforestation which also resulted from decentralisation.

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    Last edited: Aug 26, 2019
  20. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    More like New Orleans after Katrina.
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