improving reaction time

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Godhand13, Sep 27, 2010.

  1. Godhand13

    Godhand13 White Belt

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    I've got pretty slow reflexes and I want to work on them. What's a good drill for this? Also, I seem to have a phobia of being hit in the face; whenever I see something coming for me, I blink and flinch, is there any way to get over this?
     
  2. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    Take some shots to the face.

    As far as reaction drills, there are tons. Generally, you want to perform whatever it is you want to get better at. So if you wanna get better at reacting to head shots, have someone throw head shots and practice your evasive and counter shots.
     
  3. 27671

    27671 Banned Banned

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    video games for the reaction time.
     
  4. Lead

    Lead /Led/ Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Seriously? Do you train? Just wondering
     
  5. xilliun

    xilliun Brown Belt

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    Counterstrike.
     
  6. c0r1nth14n

    c0r1nth14n Blue Belt

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    I've read a few serious studies that concluded that video games not only increase your reflexes, but also that people who play a lot of video games are better at making snap decisions than those who don't.
     
  7. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    That was referencing driving if I recall correctly, and it has to do with the speed it takes for the brain to read, process, and signal a response to a particular stimulus--or to put it succinctly "brain speed".
     
  8. vjvj

    vjvj Mr. Pibb + Red Vines = Crazy Delicious

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    It's kinda funny that people mention video games, because now that I think about it, all the fighters on our team that have good timing are also good at video games.

    One trick to improve your reaction time is to not stare at your opponent's gloves/feet. Everyone has their own opinions on what's best, I like to look at my opponent's chest and use my peripheral to catch shoulder/hip movements (which usually indicates a punch or kick, respectively). Looking at their gloves is a good way to get feinted all day.
     
  9. xilliun

    xilliun Brown Belt

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    I did a reaction test when I was 14 an absolutely obsessed with counterstrike, was something like 0.14s. Did the same test two years later while having stopped with FPS games and had bumped up to 0.21s. Would definitely say it helps.
     
  10. mjw1

    mjw1 Blue Belt

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    Jab parry drill where you jab parry while your partner does the same.....

    Or you could do sticky hands (I know i'm going to get grilled for that one on here)
     
  11. Lionidas

    Lionidas Brown Belt

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    Same. It also helps hand-eye coordination making your strikes much more accurate.
     
  12. millasur

    millasur Blue Belt

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    I think it was proven only for those who reguarly played first person shooters.
     
  13. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    A good drill to improve reaction time and to get accustomed to having someone swinging at you is: With a partner work rounds back n forth where one guy is on the offensive and the other is just defending. Obviously, you start these drills at a very light pace and half speed, then just start working your way up. The idea is to be able to learn to watch your opponent, not watch the punches. Defense and countering is most affective when it is reactionary. When your defending work on staying in the pocket, not running and holding your ground, relax breathe and just watch your opponent. As you get progressively more comfortable, pick up the pace. You can also vary rounds where you do this drill with your hands down, learning to move your head, feet and use your shoulders to defend shots. Then incorporate that same movement the following round with your hands up...... Again, the idea is to start at a light pace, half speed and work your way up to. Honestly, I work this drill with several guys that started as newbies and within 3-4 months of consistently doing it they are comfortable doing defensive drills at 70+ % power and speed. At that point we start incorporating what i call the 3 and 4 drill. Where one guy throws 3-4 shots while the other just defends, then vice versa, back n forth. This helps you learn to throw in combination and use set up punches to find oppenings. Defensively it helps you learn to defend combos and return without losing pace.

    Also, double end bag is great for reaction and timing. Same for a speed bag, it helps you develop rhythm and cadence. Work on the DE bag right up on top of it and hang it at about shoulder height. It will get you in the habit of punching and moving your head together, catching shots on the forearms and shoulders. The lower height and closer proximity to the DE bag forces you to keep your upper body moving and creates awareness of punch and defend in unison.
     
  14. FaceEraser

    FaceEraser White Belt

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    I started using a double end bag recently and I feel like it definitely helps with timing and accuracy.

    When I first started sparring whenever someone really came at me I would lift my head up entirely too high. I was great at keeping my chin down in shadow boxing, but when it came to sparring I had the same thing you do. I'd flinch or close my eyes and raise my chin. My boxing coach actually helped me out with this. He'd have me spar with a girl that was probably 70lbs lighter than me, and not allow me to punch, forcing me to work on head movement and footwork. She could hit me full force, and if I got caught it didn't really do much. Really helped me get out of the automatic reaction to flinch and lift my chin.
     
  15. flikerstance

    flikerstance floridaman Double Yellow Card

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    I agree with this ive always played video games hardcore and ever since i started grappling my transitions came naturally
     
  16. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    Fully agreed on both the drills an the up n down bag. I would like to add that while the defence drills help you to get accustomed to seeing punches and kicks (knees etc) come at you, teaching you to move spontaneously...the caveat is that you'll get used to whoever your sparring partner is as well. Meaning that you need to work with varying partners with varying styles of throwing and varying preferences for combinations.

    Because what works for one may not work for some.
     
  17. lovetheforest

    lovetheforest Orange Belt

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    so your telling me that If I want to be a great fighter play video games. That sounds like a training program I can do. lol
     
  18. KlLLEmAll

    KlLLEmAll Blue Belt

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    The best way to improve reflexes and flinching is your state of mind. You need to train your brain to react by countering instead of moving away.

    Practice sparring while intentionally focusing on not flinching and only reacting to your opponents moves. Have confidence you will win.

    If your opponent throws a jab/straight/hook, focus on moving forward while slipping/ducking, throw your own counters and then move out at an angle. All this while keeping your hands covering chin and proper footwork.

    There are no special drills or equipment, just spar with the intentions listed above and you'll find in a few months your opponents will be flinching instead.
     
  19. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    Agreed. We do this drill allot where 1 guy goes into the ring and just works his defense while we continually switch in a new guy to throw offense at him. Usually we do it in 1 min intervals for 5-7 mins, great drill! It also works to assist in coaching the guys who are rotating in for offense, they watch the guy defending and try to find the holes in his defense to exploit. Great when you throw in a guy who is a lanky quick outfighter, then the next 1 min interval you toss in a shorter stockier tuck n roll pressure fighter..... keeps the guy defending from getting to comfortable.
     
  20. mikecello

    mikecello ...in bed belt

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    Play ping pong.
     

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