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How to learn to check lowkick without pain

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by JustOnce, Aug 26, 2018.

  1. JustOnce Always learning

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    I mean, how do you reduce the pain to the least when checking a kick, or learn to, when you spar with a shin guard and not have any real fights..
     
  2. CapChino White Belt

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    Watch kickboxer, jean-claude van damme. Some truth in there. Just have to find it.
     
  3. Leah Smith Yellow Belt

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    Timing is key.

    If the check is timed right, it'll really minimise the impact damage. Timed a fraction of a second wrong and it'll feel like you've been hit by a bus
     
  4. ironkhan57 Yellow Card Yellow Card

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    Experience with kicking is all it takes, have someone kick you in the leg, and just check it. Also one thing that every instructor has told me is kick the heavy bag 100x everyday and it will get conditioned.
     
  5. biscuitsbrah Red Belt

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    Right below the knee. You will miss checks thousands of times before you get it down though so get used to the pain
     
  6. dudeguyman Banned Banned

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    The section of the shin below the knee, the top of the shin, is the hardest part and at least I believe it's the least sensitive part of the shin. That's the part I block with. When I mess up and hit the middle or lower shin on my block it stings.
     
  7. aerius Red Belt

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    Key part which isn't noted in the video (but which he does do): turn the shin into the direction of the incoming kick.
    If you simply lift your leg straight up, the kick goes into the side of your leg, still does damage, and it doesn't hurt the kicker. When you turn your shin into the kick, the block goes shin on shin which hurts him more than it hurts you, and unless he's really stubborn & tough he's going to throw fewer low kicks at you after you've blocked some of them.

     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2018
  8. dudeguyman Banned Banned

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    Great elaboration. Didn't think to mention opening the hips.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2018
  9. Custommade350 Banned Banned

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    No matter how you check it you’ll still need to condition your shins.
    Make a nice hard heavy bag your friend. Don’t start beating your shins with sticks and other dumb shit. Just a hard bag, regularly and sparing.

    But for sure use proper technique to check.
     
  10. William Huggins Brown Belt

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    It's called adrenaline during the fight, things just hurt less and condition your nervous system to receive impact........no magic liniment or kicking banana trees is going to help, unless said liniment contains lidocaine.......<Lmaoo>
     
  11. Custommade350 Banned Banned

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    Kicking banana trees would probably conditions your shins. Just sayin.
     
  12. William Huggins Brown Belt

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    And cut your shins up too<Lmaoo>
     
  13. Frode Falch Gold Belt Professional Fighter

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    Adrenaline during fights and full contact sparring.

    That and also alot of volume training on pads and heavybag.

    You dont have to go full tony ferguson to harden your shin. Alot of rounds and volume on the bag and pads.

    After a while, light sparring or clinch without shin guard
     
  14. Hotora86 #StayTheFuckHome #FlattenTheCurve #WashYourHands

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    Pain is just weakness leaving the body.
    <{JustBleed}>
     
  15. ARIZE Blue Belt

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    Unless you started kicking pads and heavy bags from the age of 7, you will always have functional nerves on your shin. But years of training will diminish the pain, plus you will be mentally "prepared" to fight through it.

    Hard shin is not the same as numb shin. But you may improve both the same way, by kicking heavy bags.
    To mentally prepare for it, you can have fun kicking harder stuffs, but that wont do much more.

    In training your are not supposed to go a 100% percent and without shinpads. And for the fight days, as the others said, adrenalin does a good job. (And you can add to that, those who use the help of the caine family... co and lido/tetra and their variations)
     
  16. Torrid Cunning Linguist

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    People have pretty much completely covered it, but it's worth just reiterating - checking kicks fucking hurts.

    It can hurt more, or less, but it still fkn hurts; the general idea is that it's going to hurt the other guy a lot more, leading to him being tentative with his kicks so you can read them more easily. Not to mention that you can throw a kick immediately after a check and there's a good chance your opponent won't be completely set for it. Not really advocating a game of attrition, but when it comes to mental warfare in that capacity, it's great - check the kick and throwing your own back really erodes resolve.
     
  17. j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

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    It takes time, for me outside of regularly doing drills with checking day in day out, the heavybag pretty much conditioned my shins, it wasn't my intention to do so when I do bagwork, but its the side effect of it.
     
  18. dudeguyman Banned Banned

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    haha, "full tony ferguson"
     
  19. j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

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    time to start conditioning

    [​IMG]
     
  20. shincheckin Black Belt

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    you need to condition your shins

    you condition your shins by kicking the heavy bag, ALOT, consistently for a few years, much like growing a inch in a year goes unnoticed, if you train long enough, properly, and do your proper amount of bag work, one day outta nowhere your shins will be there. Most heavy bags are too soft, but good starting points. regarding checking kicks, you will never not feel it, it will never be pain free, but once you get them where they need to be, there will be no hesitation on your end to check a kick, or be worried about the pain involved. When a kick gets checked, it hurts the kicker more than the blocker.

    [​IMG]
     

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