How to keep notes in BJJ Class?

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Jimmy Cerra, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. Jimmy Cerra

    Jimmy Cerra Amateur Fighter

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    I tried keeping notes last time in BJJ class, but it takes so long to note everything. I can barely get a list of what we went over (without notes on how to do them)! How do you do it? Voice Recorder?
     
  2. Aesopian

    Aesopian Brown Belt

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    I just write it down when I get home because I can't keep notes and watch the instruction.
     
  3. VTJas81

    VTJas81 Blue Belt

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    same. Taking notes and watching instructionas really quicken the pace of learning.
     
  4. you could always video-record the class, depending on what your instructor would have to say about it...
     
  5. monkey roll

    monkey roll Green Belt

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    go home and write in your training log, draw pictures if you have to. Go into as much detail as you can.
     
  6. Te(V)plar

    Te(V)plar Black Belt

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    I also wait to go home. I rarely have to draw diagrams, I just use specific terms that I understand for this or that.
     
  7. SmashiusClay

    SmashiusClay Avatar of Cyttorak

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    I use little sketches when I get home, I then take a bath and go through visualisations of everything I've learned or practiced that night imagining the technique both from the third person and as if I'm either performing it or on the recieving end, I found this made a dramatic difference to my ability to retain and use what I learnt.
     
  8. Bama Zulu

    Bama Zulu Blue Belt

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    After I come home I take a shower and think about all the stuff I did that day. Then I take out my notebook and write down techniques we went over (if it's a new technique I will describe it so I will understand) then I write down who I rolled with, what I pulled off, what they did to me, etc. Lastly I write down small tips I need to do for the next class or something my instructor told me to work on. Works well for me.

    You don't need long drawn out notes, just short, concise notes that you will understand.
     
  9. OldSkool

    OldSkool Banned Banned

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    Taking notes and visualizing is an important part of getting the mountain of information that is jiu-jitsu, to stick and stay in your head.

    This particular practice for years, along with drawings of moves, and every one at Cesar Gracie's Academy wanting a notebook like that is how this book came to be;

    www.BJjBook.com
     
  10. dutchmasterj3

    dutchmasterj3 Blue Belt

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    The best thing is bring your notebook with you to class and then as soon as your session is over write down your thoughts, etc.
     
  11. LCDforMe

    LCDforMe Purple Belt

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    That's a good way to do it.

    I keep a spiral notebook in my backpack so when I'm at school, I can write down techniques that I learned before I started keeping a journal of my regular classes.
     
  12. Jimmy Cerra

    Jimmy Cerra Amateur Fighter

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    These are all excellent suggestions! Thank you everyone!
     
  13. CoutureFan16

    CoutureFan16 Purple Belt

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    I have only seen one or two people try and write down stuff that we learn in class. Im more of a visual person I guess, I just see something and I remember it. I only need to see a move a few times to remember it permanently. Ive never been much of a studier, especially in Jiu Jitsu.

    Just curious, what kinds of things do you guys record? Steps to moves? Lists of moves from various positions? In my experience with moves with numerous steps it is difficult to list each step in order, because some moves require multiple steps to be done at one time. Like with an armbar from the guard for example, after you trap the guys arm and reach across you have to take your arm that is on the same side as his trapped arm and reach across and grab your opponents shoulder, while at the same time putting your same side foot on your opponents hip, trapping it tight to his body so that he cannot escape to that side. While you could do those two moves seperately, to be really fast with an armbar you want to do both at the same time. I think that is too much to write down for one move, it should just be something you remember.
     
  14. Bama Zulu

    Bama Zulu Blue Belt

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    I just write down the move we learnt, like "Armbar from sidemount". I usually remember how to do the move unless there is little small things that I will prolly forget then I will write them down. But other than that I don't have to write down steps because I can visualize the move in my head without having to describe it.
     
  15. b0b

    b0b Banned Banned

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    I have this disease where I cannot create new memories. I get all of my jiu jitsu moves tatooed to my body.

    On a more serious note, I just practice, I don't take notes.
     
  16. Bama Zulu

    Bama Zulu Blue Belt

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    Try taking notes, it helps man.
     
  17. knoxpk

    knoxpk Black Belt

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    One way to do that si the way Rickson used to do it and he became the greatest eva by doing this.
    Ok 1st you take a memo pad, then a pen..then while in class practicing the moves he would actually hold the memo pad with his left foot while writing with his right.
    When you have mastered that during practice try that while rolling live.
    It is rumored he could write a novel while at the same time putting you in a reverse ompolata.
     
  18. Jimmy Cerra

    Jimmy Cerra Amateur Fighter

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    LOL. Or I could just develop a photographic memory!
     
  19. physicaltherapy

    physicaltherapy Blue Belt

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    LOL you should try using a polaroid camera!

    I'm the same way! I'm too effing lazy to write notes. I just buy tons of books and DVDs knowing that 90% of the moves I have learned (or will be taught) are within those books and DVDs.

    I have tried taking notes in the past. When I reread them later it didn't make any sense. Writing and drawing are for cavemen. :D
     
  20. BulldogSIX

    BulldogSIX Orange Belt

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    I write down the name of the move we just learned. For example, half guard pass to the knee bar. Then when I get home I sit down with my notebook and write out in detail what I have to do to execute it. The visualization process I go through afterwards helps me to remember the move.
     

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