how to be a good combination puncher

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by giancana, May 30, 2014.

  1. giancana

    giancana Yellow Belt

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    hey guys,

    maybe this is a stupid question but I would like to know what you consider important for a boxer that throws punches in bunches or rather uses a lot of combination?

    what are common chacteristsic of combination punchers?


    what comes to my mind is:

    speed
    accuracy


    however I would be grateful if someone could elaborate on the aspect of positioning,rythm and distance and maybe give some example which fighters or fight display those elements


    Will good positioing and good punching technique make it more save for the boxer to throw a combination? (how is good positioning defined ?, is good position only defiened by having a dominant angle ?
    or is speed the element that protects the combination puncher to not get hit as much during the combinationas as the oponent has to defend himself and rather attacks after the end of a combination?
     
  2. giancana

    giancana Yellow Belt

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    I think I found the answer:

    JMM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49JiYR9Y_48

    "Marquez does, however, have an uncanny ability to survive these knockdowns, and to be hit in a leaned-forward position without being visibly hurt. This is a result of his posture. Though he bends his back frequently (as many Mexican boxers do), his shoulders are always in the right place, pulled back to bring his chest up, and his chin pulled down. He maintains this posture even in wild exchanges."

    source= http://www.bloodyelbow.com/2013/10/...dley-ko-gif-boxing-technique-judo-chop-genius

    So as a conclusion could I state that right posture/technique implement an indirect defense mechanism during the combinations?
     
  3. KevinL314

    KevinL314 Blue Belt

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    footwork brah
     
  4. Beavis5000

    Beavis5000 White Belt

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    Well when you open up and throw any punch or punches you are leaving openings.

    JMM will brawl and that is what will get him knocked down sometimes.

    Keep your head off their center line, keep your chin tucked and pick your punches.

    Dont just go in throwing combos. Work the basics. 1, 2, 3 and see what these create.

    When you see a 4 punch combo the first 3 punches are there to set up the 4th.

    Shane Mosley I think would be a good example to watch.
     
  5. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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    Yes, positioning is huge for combination punchers. So is being able to probe and create openings, mix up tempo and power, etc. But if you're asking specifically about staying safe during combinations, then good defense should be naturally built into your punches. Posture is vital to that, not hunching your back and shoulders but keeping your spine straight. This helps keep the eyes on the opponent and leaves you in a more stable position. Good mechanics involve changing levels as you punch so that your knees are bent and you have good balance. In addition, shifting your weight hip to hip as required by what punches youre throwing gives you some head movement to make it a more difficult target. Footwork makes a big difference too, as pivots allow you to attack new openings and get out of the line of fire while continuing an attack.
     
  6. giancana

    giancana Yellow Belt

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    thank you for the help guys
     
  7. apizur**

    apizur** Aggressive Finesse.

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    I was gonna say position as well. Not just your personal position, but where you are in relation to your opponent in the ring. If you've got your fighter on the ropes and he's square... it's time to rain down hell. Plant those fucking feet and let him have it nice and smooth.

    Pacquiao throws great combinations coming forward, different type of footwork, different timing analysis of the opponent.

    If you could watch some BAD combination punchers (ESPN boxing, Broadway boxing has a lot) then compare them to GOOD combination punchers, I think you would learn more than by just watching good ones.
     
  8. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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    Agreed on the positioning.

    Even Nick Diaz, who everyone knows isn't a boxer and has terrible footwork and all that, is still a successful volume puncher because he always manages to get his opponents back against the cage and himself positioned to pummel them with long combinations. Even the guys who by consensus suck at boxing but are successful with that kind of style do it with positioning.
     
  9. dryingpole10

    dryingpole10 Yellow Belt

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    Throwing combinations is easy, the hard part is having your opponent be there for them.

    The most important part of combinations I have found is really getting a good understanding for when your opponent will step back or stand his ground.

    You need to throw combinations when he chooses to stand his ground or shell up. If he steps back you will just miss.

    It is only when you have a feel for his timing that you can start throwing combinations.

    The key to this is jab, feints, and footwork.
     
    4daLuLZ and learn2strike16 like this.
  10. TheFinerDetails

    TheFinerDetails Orange Belt

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    Fight to what's in-front of you. If you plan on throwing jab, cross, hook just for the sake of it being that combo, you make as well be learning karate combinations.
    Always fight to what's in-front of you, that means there is a huge amount of variables that goes into combination punching that I really can't go into detail with. As already mentioned, positioning is huge.
    Just remember you have to understand every key aspect that is happening to your body when you combo punch. Every time you throw, you've created some sort of gap for your opponent to counter. I can say without a doubt, there is no single punch you can throw without it being completely counter-able. Almost turns into a game of chess uno.
     
  11. giancana

    giancana Yellow Belt

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    which fighters would you recommend to watch to see how good positioning is obtained during the offense?

    are there any fighters who are effectively using footwork to trap or rather manoever the opponent into the ropes or corner (I dont mean by cutting off the ring I mean by sort of baiting them in)?
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2014
  12. Nuclearlandmine

    Nuclearlandmine Shreddin' Double Yellow Card

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    Paul Williams.
     
  13. Tony Manifold

    Tony Manifold Brown Belt

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    I was thinking about this thread recently and that is what I came up with. If you hit a guy, he moves and you need to follow him in a way that still allows you to throw good punches.

    I throw great combos on the bag,mitts or against a guy trapped in the ring but when they move I have trouble staying in a position to follow up. Since I have short arms, my footwork has to be on point and it just isn't where I need it to be.
     

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