Home made neck strengthening kit?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by iama, Dec 29, 2012.

  1. iama

    iama Orange Belt

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    Sorry guys I dont know how to properly insert videos so its just a link

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vaL3z7_fHI

    If you have a look at this pretty simple kit Klitschko is using here I think its a great tool, I just wonder if anyone has used anything like this before? It looks like a rather comfortable alternative to bridging, and I'm thinking of making one.
     
  2. TeddyRoosevelt

    TeddyRoosevelt Brown Belt

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    You can buy or make a neck harness relatively cheaply.
     
  3. iama

    iama Orange Belt

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    Yeah this is an option but, can you work all 4 ways with a harness? If so then I'd consider it, I'd just stick a towel through a weight plate I guess.
     
  4. TeddyRoosevelt

    TeddyRoosevelt Brown Belt

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    It's not always easy, but it's possible.

    The method Klitschko was using in the video looked like he was using a weighted bag that might weigh 10-20 lbs at best. That type of weight is probably not enough to efficiently strengthen the neck musculature. Muscular endurance; sure. Muscular strength; probably not.
     
  5. iama

    iama Orange Belt

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    Yeah is a weighted headband weighs about 10lbs like you say, alot of people believe light weight high reps is good training for the neck it builds hypertrophy and that is important when training the neck. Title boxing sell them but they are american based, I'm in the UK and I'm not sure if they ship em here.
     
  6. ripskater

    ripskater Guest

    I think that amount of weight is enough to strengthen the neck. You don't won't to go too heavy with the neck. And especially at first. The neck is more delicate. You don't want to grind out reps with the neck like you would 3-5 sets of deadlifts. Or you may have a very bad headache/neckache the next 2 days. I'd keep it lighter and higher reps for the neck.
     
  7. TeddyRoosevelt

    TeddyRoosevelt Brown Belt

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    Depending upon the source, most informed research I have read indicates rep ranges of 8-12 for those with "weaker" necks (eg. someone just beginning to train the neck musculature), and rep ranges of 12-20 for those with "stronger" necks (those with stronger necks, obviously, can move more weight - higher rep ranges will decrease the amount of weight used).

    Regardless of what you think, 10 pounds is probably not an efficient or effective way to develop neck strength. That's not to say that it won't strengthen your neck; that means that there are better ways to do it with less time invested - for a time-strapped amateur combat sport athlete, time management is exceedingly important.

    I know for a fact that I can put 10 pounds on my head and do 50+ reps in a single direction; I know because I have done this. Doing so left my neck sore, but probably didn't provide sufficient stimulus to provoke any significant strength gains.

    Just because boxers do it and have done it doesn't mean it's the best way to do it. Do either of you have any specific physiological evidence as to why super-high rep ranges would be ideal, or why the neck musculature should be treated as completely and wholly different and unique from the rest of the musculature in the human body?
     
  8. iama

    iama Orange Belt

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    What do you suggest would be more effective?
     
  9. TeddyRoosevelt

    TeddyRoosevelt Brown Belt

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    Something that provides enough stimulus to produce the adapatations you desire. In this case, that would mean a method that provides enough resistance to provoke strength adaptations. The resistance level will, obviously, be dependant on your current strength abilities.

    If I were going to program neck work for myself (which I am not, because I don't really have the time), I would probably start with a weight which I could move comfortably for 12 reps for ~5 sets. I would increase the reps per set every session until I hit 20 reps across the desired sets, and then reset with a higher weight. I would probably do it twice a week as assistance during my strength training work.

    At one time I was doing grip/neck work every other night. I used a 5x5 rep scheme for the neck work; my neck got stronger and I did not get injured, but the weight got heavy enough to start ripping my harness, and as a result I had to significantly decrease the weight so that I would still have a functional neck harness. Most research I have read now indicates that a 5x5 scheme is probably unideal, because of the amount of weight moved.

    I am interested to hear the opinion of someone more knowledgable than I, however.
     
  10. belph

    belph Pissing into the wind.

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    Personally, I like the harness for high reps, but I always gradually add weight. Not much, but enough. For heavier work I like Neck flexion. I had about 100 some odd pounds for ten.
     
  11. iama

    iama Orange Belt

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    Can you work the sides though?
     
  12. belph

    belph Pissing into the wind.

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    Not with the harness. Unless there's a variation I'm unaware of. perhaps some bridges?
     
  13. iama

    iama Orange Belt

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    I do bridges, but sometimes I feel to get an effective workout I need to spend like 10 minutes doing different variations, this usually leaves me with a little bit of a headache which is rather annoying. I need to invest in a decent mat to perform them on aswell, atm I use my mums yoga mat which is hopeless.
     
  14. TeddyRoosevelt

    TeddyRoosevelt Brown Belt

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    I just put the harness on sideways. It's not the intended method of use, and it's not always comfortable, but it works.

    Bridges will probably provide you with far more resistance than tying some 10 pound apparatus to your head would, and thus would be more beneficial to your goals.

    And the point of strength training is not to "feel" like you got an effective workout; it's to provide sufficient stimulus to produce the adapations you desire, regardless of how it feels.
     
  15. belph

    belph Pissing into the wind.

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    I feel retarded, can't believe I didn't think of that.
     
  16. KotovSyndrome

    KotovSyndrome Blue Belt

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    Might be interesting, opinions on neck training from two people much stronger than me:

    Building A Bigger Yoke
    (second page more exactly)

    Why You Must Train Your Neck

    I can't find the original Yoke article right now, but I think its the same as in the more recent one.
    Both employ higher volume and frequency, with Wendler being a bit higher on both terms. All in all their approach is pretty similar, especially regarding using lighter weigths. I'd try the approach incorporating bridges.
     

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