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high percentage subs to practice

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Teknik, Dec 27, 2005.

  1. Teknik

    Teknik Purple Belt

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    I was wondering what are some good high percentage moves to use during class. Right now the only moves i can really put on are the basics. Basic armbar, kimura, cross collar choke. I need at least a few more that i can remember during sparring sessions that work well against other white belts.
     
  2. Zankou

    Zankou Bringing peace and love Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Armbar, triangle, RNC. Those are your main weapons, and maybe omoplata too.
     
  3. VTJas81

    VTJas81 Blue Belt

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    White belts always tap to ankle locks. For some reason they think their foot will rip off from it
     
  4. DMcKayBJJ

    DMcKayBJJ Blue Belt

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    Armbar, cross collar choke, Americana, triangle, kimura, RNC.

    If you think you need more, you're focusing on subs too much and need to work on position and setup more.
     
  5. Waxwingslain

    Waxwingslain oiseau rebelle

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    The bat choke from KOTB works well for me.
     
  6. when you roll, dont always go for the subs. i see a lot (myself included) get dominant and rush for the first decent sub attempt. if you're in a fight, that's not bad but in class you want to improve so sometimes when you roll, just try to maintain dominance on your opponent. you can fake for subs and transition all you want but just dont tap him. don't go to a gay pin for 5 mintues but i think you know what i mean. it will also help him learn to defend and escape and etc.
     
  7. Mark Limbaga

    Mark Limbaga Amateur Fighter

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    aside from high percentage submissions, work on the proper positioning as well. Any submission becomes high percentage with proper positioning
     
  8. krellik

    krellik Gimli son of Cisco

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    Americana is a highpercent move for every newbie I have seen, ankle lock if taught right (fall to the sides kiddos..), those two moves will be good for you. Also arm triangle I feel newbies get the hang of pretty early.. I dont know any of this gi crap though..;)
     
  9. b0b

    b0b Banned Banned

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    Triangle Choke?
     
  10. Matt Thornton

    Matt Thornton Amateur Fighter

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    A lot of people have success with arm bars. I'm good with them from several positions but my arm bar from the guard needs serious work. (I only train No Gi though, so it's tougher)

    I'd say master your arm bar, kimura, and triangle choke from all positions, while also focusing on positioning (sweeps, reversals, passes, pins, etc.) All three of these can be set up from a lot of positions, and you can always invent new set ups for them.

    The triangle choke is actually really easy; easier than the arm bar to me. I used to have a lot of trouble getting it, but my problem was just that I didn't understand the set ups. The triangle choke actually has a lot more to do with hand fighting than hip movement (although moving your hips is important too). Any time one of his hands is behind the other, ESPECIALLY when it's coming close to getting behind your leg, he's susceptible to a triangle choke.

    Try this set up; Nogueira does it, and I'm sure it works great with a gi, too. Grab both of his wrists like a kimura grip (your thumbs are pointing up and away from his hands). In gi, I'm sure you can probably make this tighter by grabbing his sleeves (but I've never trained gi, so idk). From here, he doesn't know whether you're going to try to kimura, sweep, or triangle. Your choices are to either sit up and go for a kimura/sweep, OR, simply push one of his arms further back, and on that same side, bring your leg through the space you created. Put the leg you brought through across his neck, figure-4 it in the pit of your other knee, and make sure his arm is across his throat. Triangle choke.

    The most simple set up is to just push his hand to his chest and pass your leg around. For the triangle, there are endless possibilities; all you have to do is pass your leg over one of his hands.

    Again, I don't know much about grappling with a gi, but I have read that the cross collar choke is often used as a fake and a set-up to other moves. Think about a move you want to do, like the arm bar, and when you're ready, fake something else, like a collar choke, then go for the move.
     
  11. phenomfan1529

    phenomfan1529 Brown Belt

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    guillotine choke?
     
  12. Matt Thornton

    Matt Thornton Amateur Fighter

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    You know, as simple as this submission is, I almost never get it. If I use it at all, I use it like the collar choke is used in gi grappling: a set-up.

    Is the guillotine better with or without the arm? I've heard both sides of the story. In the Mario Sperry tapes, he shows the guillotine with the arm in, but in the Bas Rutten DVDs, he says the guillotine is better without the arm. It seems like the first is easier to get, while the latter is more effective. Just wondering, because the only experience I have with a guillotine is being caught with it while taking poor excuses for shots :p
     
  13. Who's Laughin' Now?

    Who's Laughin' Now? Kicker of Trolls

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    Haven't been here in a while. Just getting back into the swing of things after a long hiatus, but I'll give my n00b opinion.

    In gi practice, I got gi chokes first (cross, ezekial, an occaisional clock choke), then arm/leg triangle and rnc, then straight armbar/kimura/americana. I like to use the guillotine as a fake, then sweep/kimura/omaplata (nvr hit that, just an idea). It just seemed easier to finish these more often, I don't know if that's because I learned them in that order or if because of my grappling style they come up in that order.

    In no-gi, I got rnc and guillotine most, followed closely by americana and arm triangle, then leg triangle and straight armbar. I almost nvr get the kiura or omaplata in no-gi. I'm not that skilled at no-gi, either, so take this with a grain of salt.

    This is just my n00b opinion, feel free to disregard :D .
     
  14. Zankou

    Zankou Bringing peace and love Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    I still say you gotta go with the classic heavy artillery -- armbar, triangle, RNC. That combo is the most basic, and still the best at every level. There is a reason these three subs are the dominant ones you will see taking people out in MMA. They work no matter how big your opponent is, and are equally devastating in MMA, no-gi, bjj, the street, everywhere. They work on white belts, and they work on black belts. The other stuff is great for rounding out, but the classics are still the best.

    Stuff like kimuras/americanas/gi chokes/arm locks are good, but I find that they are less high percentage, less versatile, and usually much harder to apply against bigger/stronger guys.
     
  15. aircal

    aircal White Belt

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    armbar for sure is the top.
    then assorted chokes. those alone make up two thirds of my finishes
     
  16. randomg1t

    randomg1t EVERYTIME CHAMPION

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    great post man, thats exactly what i was thinking. armbars may be simple, but you don't get them all that much. the triangle may seem like a more difficult move but it's really great because your opponent usually gets himself in the right position. i don't even set it up that often, just wait for them to try opening/passing my guard and slap it on.

    also i think the kimura is pretty great, especially from the closed guard. with your legs locked up they've got nowhere to go and it's very unlikely you'll get subbed (actually i can't imagine how you could). and while you're working for it, they often get out of balance escaping which gives you a great chance to sweep and get the mount.
     
  17. tequilaman

    tequilaman Guest

    The "Big Three" arm locks- the Kimura, the Key Lock, and the straight arm lock- should all be memorized and practiced regularly. They are also easy to learn.

    remember though, submissions are meaningless unless you can get into position to perform them.

    Concentrate on positioning, and retaining dominant positions first, then you should work on the subs.

    So many people do it backwards by learning the subs first, and forgetting that they need to have good positioning and balance control before attempting the sub.
     
  18. spsickboy

    spsickboy Guest

    I would say it all kind of depends on the person. For me, it would be armbars. I can work an armbar from just about any postion. But one of my buddies is really good with chokes. I would say to just look at what you are pulling off alot in practice and try to perfect that. IF you hit a lot of chokes then work on gettin postion for them and the sinking them in.
     
  19. ddk

    ddk White Belt

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    i prefer the guillotine with the arm in. without the arm trapped, there may be more pressure on the neck, but all the guy has to do is throw the arm over your shoulder/behind your head, stand up, drive his shoulder into your face, and the guillotine disappears and youre in a bad position to be passed.
     
  20. 2om30

    2om30 Red Belt

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    americana
     

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