Had my first MMA class today

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Lawblaw, Aug 20, 2015.

  1. Lawblaw

    Lawblaw Black Belt

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    I made a thread not so long ago about me wanting to train MMA. I've been training Muay Thai for like 8 months but I wanted to try MMA and I had my first class today.

    It was with a professional MMA fighter (He fights in One FC)

    Here is what happened.

    He told me to change my Muay Thai stance. I always stand in a traditional Muay Thai stance, I like to distribute my weight like 20% on my left lead leg and 80% on my right leg. He told me to make it 50% 50%.

    He also told me to work on my Jab. My jab isn't powerful because my lead leg is always bouncing up and down, I like to mix it with the teep but he told me forget that.

    What I really thought was interesting was how he was using angles. I never did that.

    Anyway, I don't know if I should go for MMA or focus on Muay Thai and try to master just one style. I knew that the striking is different in MMA but I never imagined it would be that much different.

    Almost all of the techniques I like to use he's telling me not to use. (But I did find the angle thing quite interesting)
     
  2. LogicalError

    LogicalError Purple Belt

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    Was there any clinching/TD drills involved? Wrestling will change your stance pretty quick
     
  3. Young Turkey

    Young Turkey Green Belt

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    I'm surprised that this would be new to you. Watch an MMA fight, then watch a Muay Thai fight, and you should be able to see all these differences right away.
     
  4. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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    If your goal is to eventually transition to MMA then I'd recommend getting yourself to a boxing gym at some point. The striking there is a lot more similar to what you'll get taught in MMA, and once you have that foundation you can add your MT skills in more easily.
     
  5. j123

    j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

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    Why not work with the striking available at the MMA gym?
     
  6. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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    It's very rarely at even close to the same level. The best guys in the sport get top specialists at their gyms (Pedro Diaz with the Blackzilians for example) but at the amateur level, you're most likely gonna get taught striking by guys who aren't all that qualified to teach it. There are obviously exceptions, but good boxing training builds much better fundamentals than I've seen taught by 90% of MMA striking coaches.
     
  7. SummerStriker

    SummerStriker Black Belt

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    I'm not disagreeing with you, but there is a flip side.

    Standing at striking range slipping and throwing combos, or worse, advancing while throwing pressure combos without first wobbling the opponent, will get you clinched and taken down. That makes all the boxing you learned useless.

    The strategy has to be adapted to MMA. Fundamentals are alright when it comes to boxing, like how to move and do this or that, but the strategy can't come from there.
     
  8. ifight907

    ifight907 Yellow Belt

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    You both have very valid points. I've had over 20 regional fights in just over a decade. I spent time early in my training working specifically with just a boxing trainer who, while not MMA experienced, was into the sport, doing Kajukenbo and boxing in his youth. He was probably way easier at that time to work with, as far as a traditional boxing coach, so before he left state, he blended easily in the MMA practices that he came to. And just working mitts with him the practices we had at the boxing gym did me wonders.

    That said, you need to spend time sparring in an MMA setting. Not every session has to be anymore than 50% power, but you have to learn how to strike in MMA range if that's your goal, fighting in MMA. Supplementing your grappling and striking instruction with lots of sparring is what will make you a well rounded fighter nowadays. You don't want any of the hang ups of any one facet of the game. Learn to transition seamlessly. You should be doing mostly sparring with 16s and shins, mostly. I'll throw in some work with the bigger teardrop gloves, mostly for the grappling side of MMA practice, as well.
     
  9. ifight907

    ifight907 Yellow Belt

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    Also, doing pure boxing sparring with legit boxers will make you confident as hell when you spar or during the standup part of a fight. Guys dedicated to the craft of boxing can do things that will amaze you when you're up close, punching and getting punched back.
     
  10. DoctorTaco

    DoctorTaco Breadhead

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    Don't wait for Mma sparring to find out why he's right, just do what he says.
     
  11. Lawblaw

    Lawblaw Black Belt

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    I always knew that.. I guess when you try it yourself its a different story.
     
  12. Lawblaw

    Lawblaw Black Belt

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    I'm not planning on being a professional fighter (yet?) I just want to be really good at something. Whether its Muay Thai, or MMA. Of course its easier to be good in one art.
     
  13. TheFinerDetails

    TheFinerDetails Orange Belt

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    Ever watch Spong's kickboxing fights?
    Ever watch Spong's MMA fights?
    There's a reason one of the greatest k1 style fighters isn't fighting like a kickboxer in MMA (and it's obviously not because, "he doesn't know how to strike properly").
     
  14. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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    There are clinchers in boxing too. Learning how to not get held is a skill that can be developed just like anything else, although not many emphasize it. Good head movement and angles in the pocket make you a hell of a lot harder to take down.

    There's definitely more to watch out for. If has to be put in context, but you can even take strategies from boxing and implement them with an understanding of the game.
     
  15. Samuel Reynoso

    Samuel Reynoso Orange Belt

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    Impossible questions.

    MMA striking is a mad house. It's kind of like a poker champ playing a table of amateurs. You have to adjust to the over aggressive plays. Spamming power strikes and power takedowns is polarizing and limits the subtlety that pros rely on for long term success.

    There is no way of knowing if you coach knows what he's talking about. I, like your coach, believe in a strong jab and a front kick over the teep to deal with MMA strikers, but I have a why for the what, and could adjust that rule of thumb. Idk what will make you the best MMA fighter you could be, but I don't think it's wrong to question your coach, or ask why.

    ...it's inevitably that you form your own opinions on this stuff anyway.
     
  16. roventu

    roventu Brown Belt

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    there was a lot of focus on striking in your post. but that shouldn't be the deciding factor between choosing MMA or Muay Thai. it should be the other disciplines of MMA - wrestling, bjj, etc. - that should probably sway your decision. if you dont enjoy dedicating your time to those too, and just want to strike, well you've got your answer.
     
  17. TheDarkEmperor

    TheDarkEmperor Orange Belt

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    If you want to be a better/more effective fighter, or be better at self-defense, go with MMA. It utilizes the highest percentage tecniques from Muay Thai while removing those that would cause trouble in a "Street"/mma fight scenario. If you just want to compete in something, and learn some self defense at the same time, take whichever style you prefer.

    I think of it this way... against an MMA fighter, a boxer in a boxing match, a kickboxer in a kickboxing bout, a muay thai fighter in a muay thai bout, a wrestler in a wrestling match, and a bjj specialist in a grappling competition, would all most likely win, or at least have the advantage.

    However, when there are either no rules, or mma rules, an mma fighter would almost always quickly finish all of them.
     
  18. TheFinerDetails

    TheFinerDetails Orange Belt

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    pls no
     
  19. Tug

    Tug Green Belt

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    refreshing perspective, TheDarkEmperor
     
  20. Celestial Kid

    Celestial Kid Banned Banned

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    Up your bootay!
    In MT, angles are less used than mma or boxing because there are kicks to keep your opponent in place. You also have to check kicks as well. With the threat of takedowns, kicks aren't spammed. CK disagrees with your instructor. You can mix your jab with your teep. There is no problem with that. IN regards to your traditional MT stance, CK recommends you adapt your traditional MT stance by lowering your center of gravity.
     

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