Fedor's Overhand Right: Close-up

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by YukisHeart, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. YukisHeart

    YukisHeart Brown Belt

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    I'm always interested to hear people analyse the overhand, since it's so prevalent in MMA despite being a big no-no for boxers.

    Not sure all the punches the video maker has zeroed in on are overhands rather than right crosses, straights or imperfect hooks, but it's a good close-up of Fedor's technique nevertheless.

    Anyone able to venture a breakdown?
     
  2. YukisHeart

    YukisHeart Brown Belt

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    Not strictly relevant, but the uploader had a much longer video showcasing Igor's striking, too:



    Pretty interesting.
     
  3. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

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    I love the Brett Rogers one, not because it's a pretty punch--it isn't, as you can see from Fedor almost falling over but for Brett's body getting in the way--but because Fedor throws that massive punch with just about no telegraphing. He doesn't **** back or anything, he just... uncoils, I guess.

    I wouldn't say the overhand is a no-no. I throw a shitty one, but I actually used it tonight in light sparring and--it works. I think it may be so prevalent in MMA because guys get those big gloves up in front of their faces in sparring, something you don't see as much in boxing because of the higher level of skill, and the overhand is the perfect counter to that sort of defense. Drop down, head off-line, and wing your fist over their guard. Shit works.

    Good Igor video! He punched very well moving backwards, didn't he? I honestly think Igor, with a bit better grappling, would wreck much of the light heavyweight division even today.

    Edit: Speaking to their particular style of hook/overhand, I believe the elbow-up forefinger knuckle landing was a Communist standard. Look at this young Soviet amateur boxer throw his hooks on the pads.

     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2013
  4. Reyesnuthugr

    Reyesnuthugr Dominick Reyes Belt

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    You don't want to use it in place of a jab because a good counter-fighter will time you and make you pay dearly

    But it's not wrong at all to throw it at the right time, in the right way. It works in some instances a right straight (AKA "cross") would not
     
  5. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

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    [​IMG]
     
  6. Reyesnuthugr

    Reyesnuthugr Dominick Reyes Belt

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    ^^ Very nice. And that guy isn't exactly known as "sloppy"
     
  7. Zephyros

    Zephyros White Belt

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    I don't know about it being a big no-no in boxing. It's a legit technique, just perhaps overused and with questionable form and setup when used in MMA. It might be the most natural to throw and generate power from though, given the amount of time that most MMA fighters can afford to train their boxing. Most people grow up around football/dodgeball/baseball, so some of the muscle memory is probably there to begin with. The superman punch is similar to the overhand right in this regard as well.

    As for Fedor, his style of punching isn't exactly textbook boxing. He often seems like a wild puncher, but it's actually his style to do so. Fedor was surprisingly technical, in his prime especially. He throws something called "Casting Punches" (This is off the top of my head, so bear with me) it originates from Sambo (One of the two, anyway) and before that, supposedly from studies and research from the Soviet Union, back when they were doing a lot of experiments on human physiology, one of which being optimal power generation in the human body.

    The issue with this sort of punching technique, however, lies in the fact that the whipping motion means it is often difficult to be accurate with a Casting Punch. Fedor had numerous injuries, where he would hit end up hitting his opponent with his thumbs, dislocating them numerous times. It's not a stretch to say these accumulated injuries contributed to his decline at the end of his career.

    Also forgot to mention: they also have a tactical advantage of being able to parry someone's guard down, presenting openings, being difficult to track, and often used them to set up his Sambo grappling techniques with great effectiveness. People used to consider him the ATG for a reason.
     
  8. db03892

    db03892 Brown Belt

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    What you don't see there is Marquez going to the body 5 or 6 times before. He fakes another body shot and then hits Pacquiao with a right hand.
    There is a lot more to that gif than meets the eye.
     
  9. Discipulus

    Discipulus Black Belt

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    Oh absolutely. The gif was meant to back up what Reyesnuthugr said. It's not a go-to punch for every scenario, but obviously some very skilled boxers utilize it. Another favorite gif:

    [​IMG]

    Hell, some of the best classical boxers threw most of their right hands on a looping trajectory.

    Watch some of the punches that the great Charley Burley threw.



    It just takes the right knowledge of the technique to make it work.
     
  10. Nuclearlandmine

    Nuclearlandmine Shreddin' Double Yellow Card

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    There should be a mention of Rocky Marciano's phantom overhand. I think he knocked Joe Louis out with that. It was called it that way because it was coming from out of opponent's sight and incredibly hard to defend.
     
  11. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    I think one of the best examples of the OH in MMA is the Reem. He throws it exceptionally well. I like that he throws it fast and as short chopping OH right. He counters well with it, and doesn't lunge off balance when he throws it and therefore transitions into his next shot very well. He'll even use it as a feint to come back to his left hand or knee. See clip below, a couple of excellent examples early in the vid.

     
  12. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    As for Boxing, there have been more than a few boxers who have thrown not so pretty overhands and done well with them. Not that it's a good idea, but still, boxing isn't exempt from fighters that throw those lunging overhands with effectiveness.

    compared to Fedor's OH, this ain't much different.


    another example


    Personal Favorite, throws that right hand like a sledge hammer!

     

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