Everlast 4305 Bag Mitt Review

Discussion in 'Gear & Equipment Reviews' started by hangulmalmotayo, Jan 5, 2019.

  1. hangulmalmotayo

    hangulmalmotayo Green Belt

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    This review is long overdue. I have been using the Everlast 4305 mitts for a while now (can’t remember when I started using them but it’s definitely been over a year, maybe closer to two?). One of the other forum members (@makedansure) introduced me to them and I really have not found anything matching them since.

    This review will partly take the form of an apologia for bag mitts, generally, given the negative press that they have received all around—even, and I say this with shame, by members of this hallowed forum.

    The reasons why bag mitts are almost universally poo-pooed seems to have to do with the fact that those who try them out tend to end up with various wrist sprains/injuries. Indeed, some users on here often recommend going for gloves with greater ‘wrist protection’ in order to avoid exactly such injuries. From the vantage point of wrist protection, then, these gloves are not at all promising. At least these are the sorts of things one hears when the topic of bag mitts is raised.

    But such gravely mistaken notions stem from an attitude towards wrist sprains, specifically, and physical health, generally that is wrong. Very wrong. It seems to me that a lot of wrist injuries have less to do with gloves and more to do with punch technique and wrist strength. That is, if you’re injuring your wrists, it’s probably because you have weak wrists that need strengthening. In such cases, it is perhaps more prudent to fix one’s ‘weakest link’ rather than attempting to compensate for it extrinsically. People who are prone to wrist sprains while using low-wrist protection gloves need to focus on strengthening their wrists rather than finding gloves that are like casts. Your punching power should be directly proportionate to what your wrist and knuckles can handle. By training ‘power’ without simultaneously working on wrist strength and hand strength is a way to train for injury in the long term.

    That said, the bag mitts are an excellent tool if used intelligently, to train your wrists for power punching. It is not easy, however, and takes some time—beginning with lighter and more carefully placed punches on the bag, before gradually working up to harder more powerful punches. Of course, if you start out trying to destroy a heavy bag while wearing bag mitts, you will most likely get injured. But this is a stupid way to do things. If you start out well, though, you can confidently and competently hit the bag (just as hard as you would with heavily padded gloves) with the minimal protection and support that one finds in bag mitts.

    OK. With that out of the way, I can review the Everlast 4305s more properly.

    What makes these mitts so great? There are a few things that come to mind, but I will list them here in order:

    1. The foam padding is of a density that I have so far not come across with either gloves or bag mitts. It is kind of like very dense memory foam. Very dense, though. So I can push down on the foam really hard with my finger, and there will be a dent there, but it takes some pressure and the indent will gradually come back out. As a result of the density of the padding, one gets almost immediate feedback from one’s punches. On account of the memory foam character (which is minimal), the amount of shock is reduced greatly. It’s the perfect combination of shock absorption and feedback. The thickness of the padding (@makedansure can correct me) seems to be a bit less than an inch. This is an estimate based on feel.

    2. The simplicity of the glove also contributes to its character. As you can see from the pictures, there’s not much to this glove. There is an elastic strap, a hole for ventilation and that’s about it. When I work out, I wrap my hands, and simply slip the gloves on. The first few punches are almost like calibration punches, but once I’ve figured out the sense of where to land the glove, I can punch just as hard as I would if I were wearing a pair of MS600s. No lie.

    3. On account of the density of the foam and the durability of the liner, the gloves do tend to last a while. I used the first pair of these (which were already aged, though not terribly used when I got them) for about a year. These mitts have lasted longer than most full-sized ‘training’ gloves. I think this is normal because training gloves simply are not meant for use on the heavy bag; bag mitts are for the heavy bag. In any case, the gloves are very durable and feel fantastic once you get the hang of them. (In fact, I can attribute my savings in recent years with regard to buying gear, in part, to these bag mitts.)

    Cons:

    1. The learning curve is an initial con. But most things that are worthwhile require time and patience. (See apologia for bag mitts above.) The same is true for using these mitts. When I moved on from my first pair to the second, I had to endure some skinning on my knuckles to break in the leather and get it to stretch out to fit my hand. Such is life. But once callouses have formed, they work great.

    2. At least on my first pair, the leather began to deteriorate towards the end, which is a first for any leather glove. I think that is attributable to the fact that the leather was already pretty old when I got them (they smelled like potpourri). The second pair is so far not developing any signs of deteriorating as the first pair did. Also, the leather on this second pair is much more supple. That said, the first pair were thoroughly abused on the heavy bag. So it’s not terribly surprising. The interior liner also began to tear, which is what finally caused me to retire the gloves.

    In sum, they are really excellent gloves. It is definitely worth taking the time to learn how to use bag mitts. Your wrists will thank you in the future. Don’t listen to the naysayers, because they likely haven’t spent the requisite time to benefit from bag mitts.

    Finally, if some glove maker on here could find a foam similar to these bag mitts and replicated them, that would be wonderful.

    Behold, pictures (members will recognize these pictures from earlier and other posts because I am too lazy to take new ones):
    4305 B.jpg 4305 B4.jpg 4305 B3.jpg 4305 B 2.jpg

    The older pair:
    4305 A.jpg
    4305 A2.jpg

    Many thanks again to @makedansure for introducing me to bag mitts and giving me these two pairs.

    Cheers, all.
     
  2. Kick_@ss_Seabass

    [email protected]_Seabass Blue Belt

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    What a brutal way to die. Poor mitts, thought they were going to end up as collector's items but finished their lives in the hands of the one and only gloves destroyer ;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2019
  3. SMSLY

    SMSLY White Belt

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    I'm glad you get on with mitts and wish I did too.

    Wrist support and wrist injury for those with pussy wrists like mine have everything to do with eachother though.

    This isnt a be all and end all argument, but how many pros hit bags with mitts these days and why?
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2019
  4. hangulmalmotayo

    hangulmalmotayo Green Belt

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    For sure. I'm not saying there are not licit reasons for wrist support but they are a necessary evil not something to be desired for its own sake.

    Also, I'm mainly pushing back against some older dismissive reviews of bag mitts on here. Not trying to insult anyone for using gloves with wrist support.
     
  5. Kick_@ss_Seabass

    [email protected]_Seabass Blue Belt

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    These lasted you longer then regular boxing gloves before breaking ?
     
  6. hangulmalmotayo

    hangulmalmotayo Green Belt

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    Yup.
     
  7. Kick_@ss_Seabass

    [email protected]_Seabass Blue Belt

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    Crazy considering they have less padding and dont look as sturdier then boxing gloves. The less padding could be the answer tho.

    Great review as always bud
     
  8. hangulmalmotayo

    hangulmalmotayo Green Belt

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    Some still do: Usyk, Prograis, Inoue. Others seem to use fight gloves on the bag.

    All the old school boxers did.

    Why don't more pros use bag mitts? I don't know. I know bag mitts have definitely improved my technique and power. If I could afford to use fight gloves on the heavy bag, though, I'd probably do that instead.
     
  9. Minowafanatic

    Minowafanatic Black Belt

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    Fab review. I saw a video of Anthony Joshua hitting pads with bag mitts on recently.

    I got some mitts in December (with a velcro strap-around so it's not that mitt-ful) and I find that after four or five rounds on the bag, I start feeling some discomfort in my left wrist, where I have a permanent fracture from a previous injury, though not on the uninjured wrist. I don't know if that's because of a deficiency in technique that I can figure out, or if it can't ever be improved because of my injury, or what exactly the physiological process is behind "strengthening" a wrist that would be attributable to hitting a bag.
     
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  10. Kick_@ss_Seabass

    [email protected]_Seabass Blue Belt

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    Which mitts did you get ? If i remember, you too have freakishly long fingers lol
     
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  11. HandNoise

    HandNoise Yellow Belt Platinum Member

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    Great review man! Back in the day my pops used to hit the bag fairly often with mitts, they seem to have been black Everlast 4302.

    Just a question out of curiosity, I’ve read from you before you really have no trouble at all with your wrists. And as you mention throwing hard and proper technique. How do you throw your hooks on the bag? Do they land with your fist vertically or horizontally?
     
  12. hangulmalmotayo

    hangulmalmotayo Green Belt

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    Thanks!

    I actually throw my hooks both ways on the bag landing on the first two knuckles in each case. Hope that helps.
     
  13. makedansure

    makedansure Blue Belt

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    the review I wish I could have written but was always too lazy to write.
    • One of the reasons they fell off was because the great minds of the boxing equipment industry/businessmen decided that they needed to market and push a new, more profitable item - the super bag glove. "Why train in a six ounce bag mitt if the fight glove weighs 8 oz? Surely training with more weight is much more beneficial!"
    • Padding is a little less than an inch, or maybe it just feels that way because mine have been worn down. Very dense, and the perfect amount imo.
    • Long cuff / velcro strap providing wrist support myth: akin to high top basketball sneakers providing ankle support. For those of you that don't know, the ankle support thing has been debunked for the most part. What prevents ankle sprains is proper technique, not stepping on others' feet, stable cushioning, and most of all, proper fit. Ankle braces are another thing altogether.
    • I asked Freddie why they became so uncommon in use. He responded pretty quickly, that it's because people are wussies
    • Last note is off topic, but the same thing is happening with the facesaver. Pacquiao started using and suddenly everyone and their mother began demanding and using the facesaver. Unless you had some serious face problems / have a very large+breakable nose / have scraps of metal lodged in your eyes, there is really no need for you to use a facesaver. Btw, I suspect the cut on Andre Ward's face that occurred while he was using the FG5000 was due to the fact that the saver actually added an extended lever arm that generated more torque to the punch and tore his skin due to it sticking to his face, which is why vaseline is good to use on the face underneath the guard.
    First time I used bag mitts (old tuf wear) they felt amazing. Was coming off wrist/elbow/shoulder injuries due to using some fat IMFs, got a little too cocky and totally bombed my wrist on a crappy heavybag. Learned that I should always use wraps, and started working with mitts again. Knuckles still get a little sore depending on the bag and my sloppiness, skin occasionally tears.

    These mitts are totally unnecessary unless you want to learn how to really hurt someone with a punch. Was pondering this the other day - maybe it's good that the majority of the boxing world has forgotten about these. Did you know that pacquiao has 8" wrists?
     
  14. HandNoise

    HandNoise Yellow Belt Platinum Member

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    Okay! I actually throw the same reguarding knuckle placement sometimes with the fist almost downward. I was taught to throw it by landing the fist horizontally but naturally the other way is also easier and quicker at close ranges. I also saw Wilfredo Gomez correcting a kid on that, and I noticed when I do throw it horizontally it almost feels like if its in a locking motion, like it just drags more weight due to the angle. It can be thrown either way with good technique ofcourse but I always felt throwing it like that helped prevent injuries as it looks more forgiving than landing vertically and twisting your wrist or further injuring yourself. I hope you understand me. <45>

    I asked because I’ve also been banging the bag hard since I was like 15 and never had wrist problems just some knuckle pain from nearly hooking my hand off over the years. That’s just while im punching. But also notice like you said how much wrist support is considered in reviews and when asking for recommendations, and I agree wrist strength and better technique is a must otherwise switching gloves is just putting a cushiony bandage on a moist cut without allowing it to heal properly and get some hard stronger scar tissue in there.
     
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  15. Minowafanatic

    Minowafanatic Black Belt

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    I don't know about the facesaver point, as cuts in facesavers seem genuinely more rare which is why that Ward instance is so well remembered, and then that's got to be good for a fighter coming up to competition time, so long as the worse vision and added weight and size etc isn't felt to be too much of an impediment. I agree for hobbyists, in that I don't think there's much point in a hobbyist using a facesaver over something with cheek protectors so long as they don't have those issues you described.
     
  16. makedansure

    makedansure Blue Belt

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    @Minowafanatic
    I'll respond to you in another as it's off topic (I know, I started it haha)

    Here's footage of Joe Frazier using the 4305.


    It's my opinion that one of the greatest advantages to these gloves is how they help work accuracy. love trying to pop a hole in the heavybag.
     
  17. Woldog

    Woldog Boxer

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    I've used facesavers since I found affordable ones (UMA, R2C) before them I was sparring without headgear (Like everyone else at the gym). I love my facesavers but I've found the "heroes" at the gym who think they're Mike Tyson believe that because I'm wearing one they can just go like it's an actual fight. Now I'm 69kgs and like 5'9 and the people who spar like fucktards are between 80 and 100kg, so they get offended when I start dirty sparring if they don't settle down after I ask them to. Nothing like a good low blow or accidentally clipping them with an elbow to get them to calm down.
     
  18. j-boxing

    j-boxing Human, all too human

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    I use bag mitts and I have weak wrists. Furthermore, the reason I use bag mitts is actually because I have weak wrists.

    The use of bag mitts did wonders for my technique. That led to the discovery that (surprise!) poor technique was the source of my wrist problems.

    I'm of the view that everyone should own a good pair of bag mitts.
     
  19. SMSLY

    SMSLY White Belt

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    One day sb who says mitts are superior for techqiue will explain why exactly. Is it cos you can't throw slappy hooks that land on the finger or what?

    If that's all it is it's not worth it for sore knuckles and joints imo. Obviously everybody has different joints and knuckles so I'm just speaking for myself.
     
  20. hangulmalmotayo

    hangulmalmotayo Green Belt

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    No. It's because when you wear gloves with a lot of padding and wrist support, you lose any real sense or feedback regarding how and where you're landing punches and whether your wrists are properly aligned. Your punches end up being not as sharp as they could be. Even occasional use of mitts is beneficial.

    Think of doing knuckle push-ups with gloves on vs. without gloves. You get a lot more benefit in terms of learning how to make a proper fist along with a sense of proper wrist and forearm alignment with the latter. You also get a sense of where exactly the pressure should be on your knuckles in order to prevent wrist sprains. It's harder to do initially, but it pays off.

    It's not terribly complicated I don't think. Not for everyone. But I think it should help most.
     

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