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Effing Feints.

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by BrokenNose, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. BrokenNose

    BrokenNose Orange Belt

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    God damn. I hate feints. They mess me up so bad.

    First I'm going to double-check how I'm supposed to be looking at an opponent, and see if that's the key issue. From what I know, or have heard, you are generally supposed to look at the opponents shoulders for their movement, not the eyes or hands. I guess this is to see when they're shifting their weight for the real punches, and then use your peripherals to see where and where the punch is coming from.

    Amirite?

    I still react to feints, especially jab-feints. They mess me up horribly.



    Any tips? Or is this something I'll just adapt to sooner or later?
     
  2. Bennosuke

    Bennosuke Blue Belt

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    It takes a long time to get used to predicting what an opponent is doing or trying to make you think they are doing. Sparring practice will help you get good at reading your opponenents actions. Yes you should be looking at their shoulders, I actually tend to look at the place where their clavicles come together.

    Just keep practicing and keep your hands up
     
  3. dtravis92

    dtravis92 Orange Belt

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    I can't tell without seeing your sparring, but one reason may be that you are a little too tense. If you are calm,loose, and relaxed you will respond better to their shots or feints. Also here is a video showing where to look, i think that way is the best.

     
  4. TwoFour Lowkick

    TwoFour Lowkick Orange Belt

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    It takes awhile to get used to.. I worked hard on my reaction time and it helped. So whether or not its a real jab or a faint, i try no to react until the last possible nano second. I try not to react until the jab's about an inch away from my face. I was taught then when slipping punches i should move at the last possible instant and so slight that i may get brushed very slightly by the opponents. This is also helpful for countering since you're not stepping out of your own range.
     
  5. headstomp1

    headstomp1 Blue Belt

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    it's an adaption process, but one i'm still having trouble with aswell. Main problem is being too tense and over committing to a slip or trying to catch a punch just gotta relax those shoulders.
     
  6. rarafury

    rarafury Orange Belt

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    stay loose and eat some punches if u have to
     
  7. Cdn_Fight_Fan

    Cdn_Fight_Fan Green Belt

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    Can someone talk about using feints instead of just how to deal with an opponent who is using them (sorry to hijack lol). Feints you have success with, any important things to make sure to do etc. Specifically for boxing.

    I'd like to start using them but my coaches have never really tought me :icon_conf
     
  8. dtravis92

    dtravis92 Orange Belt

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    Here is a couple good videos. To deal with feints you need to make sure that you are relaxed and are not overdoing you defensive movements ( like over-parrying a punch, all you have to do to parry is redirect it slightly, but some people take their hand far away from their face). Also you need to make sure that you aren't watching their gloves, but their chest/shoulder area (watch the first video i posted on this thread)


     
  9. 35andOver

    35andOver Blue Belt

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    I love using feints myself. It's a lot of fun to make a guy jump with just a little shoulder feint.

    From my point of view as someone that uses them, I would say the people that deal with them best are the guys that look to counter punch or kick off my jab immediately. A guy that is looking to catch the jab and fire off his own counter jab or a quick 1-2 won't be AS phased by a feint. If they keep good form (relaxed efficient motion, head off center, chin down, hide behind their shoulder on the jab etc) my follow up jab or right behind the feint is going to be far less likely to land flush.

    Guys that get frozen by feints and then lit up are generally way too tense and way too defensive minded at that moment.

    Try to relax and try to react by punching back. If the guy jabs you, jab him back. If the guy tries to jab you but you make him miss, hit him back for trying to hit you. If the guy fakes that he's going to hit you, hit him back for faking it. If the guy winks at you, hit him. If he smiles, hit him. If he just stands there and looks at you, hit him.
     
  10. ambertch

    ambertch Purple Belt

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    People overthink it when it comes to feints. It's as simple as:
    - against guys not as skilled as you, you see their feints and you can feint them.
    - against guys more skilled than you, they see your feints and they can feint you.


    It's not like there's really a technique to see feints and execute them - the higher level you train at and the sparring partners you have, the more experience you have, I think it just naturally comes along. This is different than say, technique, where a coach can watch you and say "do XYZ"

    People talk about fighters having "good eyes." Seeing feints is essentially having good eyes. And having good eyes just comes from being around a high level.
     
  11. Rhood

    Rhood Gold Belt

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    ^^^^^
    This is a very resourceful post. ambertch said it just right
     
  12. EVIL5150

    EVIL5150 Brown Belt

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    Try not to chase attacks as you see them coming, only parry as they enter your close proximity. This will keep you from biting on feints and keep you ready to counter faster.

    As was posted before, loosen up and stay relaxed. Once you start biting on feints and getting anxious it only makes you an easier target.

    If your opponent is feinting too much, punish them with quick straight shots. Shut that shit down by popping them in the mouth. Once they have to respect your offense they'll have a harder time taking your defense lightly.
     
  13. SpineBreaker

    SpineBreaker Orange Belt

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    Try the eyes again. Never look at anything else. Try and feel what your opponent is feeling as well, and you should be able to develop a subconscious ability to react.
     
  14. EVIL5150

    EVIL5150 Brown Belt

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    Eyeball feinting someone who's trying to read your eyes is some of the easiest feinting there is though:

    look low hit high
    look high hit low
    stare blankly between their shoulders and fire a hard straight to the jawline
     
  15. stuntcum

    stuntcum Yellow Belt

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    Don't forget that the more effective a move is, the more effective its feint will be.


    Don't be one of these MMAist who throw superman punches before ever throwing a round kick
     

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