Duane Ludwig.

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by $uperman, May 25, 2014.

  1. $uperman

    $uperman Black Belt Platinum Member

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    When Duane Ludwig became coach at Team Alpha Male in December 2012, their fighters became far better strikers. And yesterday T.J. Dillashaw TKO's Renan Bar
     
  2. Cyclone Mike

    Cyclone Mike Amateur Fighter

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    I don't remember what everyone else looked like, but Dillashaw used superior angles to whoop Barao's ass. He looked like the white version of Sinister's boxer Daijon.
     
  3. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    He teaches them how to fight. There's not one single tiny detail.
     
  4. aries

    aries Silver Belt

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    Head movement, feinting, combination attacks and cutting angles. TJ had some of the most effective stance switching I have seen so far in MMA where as normally it's done it seems just to look flashy or throw a couple of techniques. TJ was fighting out of southpaw as much as he could once Duane told him to stick with it.

    And the thought behind the techniques. For instance I like the straight left to left high kick that he kept landing on Barao. Normally I don't because it results in a pretty weak and ineffectual funky looking kick but because Barao was slipping outside that rear hand he was slipping into the following same side high kick increasing it's effect many times.
     
  5. NAKMUAY18

    NAKMUAY18 Brown Belt

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    I was impressed with his movement, but not so much his footwork if that makes any sense? His lateral movement was nice and his use of space, but the way his feet were crossing and he was leaping in and out I can see him getting timed. He did a good job of not getting hit, but when he did get hit he was off balance and his feet weren't under him. I just have this feeling that somebody is going to be able to time that switch point or when he comes in with that rear lead and clean him out.
    The stance switching then leading with the rear hand confused Barao as much as anything. It kind of reminds me of when Machida first burst on the scene and his unorthodox style needed figuring out before anybody could beat him.
    I'm not trying to down play Tj though, the stance switching, rights to the body to left head kicks, lovely stuff. I also can't think of anybody in that weight class (other than maybe Faber ironically) that could run the game plan needed to take him out?
     
  6. $uperman

    $uperman Black Belt Platinum Member

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    I have done Karate, Kickboxing and Boxing, but I have never learned about angles. I have only learned about striking techniques, blocking, parrying, combo attacks, countering with combo's, slipping + counters, bobbing and weaving + counters.

    How does this superior angles thing work?
     
  7. devante

    devante Silver Belt

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    Agree...faber would have his number...maybe assuncao presents some issues..dillashaw is far from unbeatable though ...I predicted he would beat barao and essentially finish it late...

    On twitter...not here...but I was not shocked by how it went imo there were alot of fronts to attack barao on and alot of holes he had that could be capitalized on.
     
  8. devante

    devante Silver Belt

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    What is the difference between bang muay Thai and everyone else's muay Thai...I mean what is it that seperated bang from master tong or winklejohn or rafeal cordeiro. I know he gets results but what are the tech philosophical difference between what he does and others do.
     
  9. Jukai

    Jukai Silver Belt

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    Faber can easily beat TJ? Faber's habit of spamming that lean-left-throw-right combo is going to get him knocked out with the way TJ feigns the way he does.

    Well, if TJ is using Bang Muay Thai, I'd say just about everything.
     
  10. TheFinerDetails

    TheFinerDetails Orange Belt

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    It's probably the hardest thing you'll ever get your head around about fighting. Simple concept, incredibly hard to execute effectively.
    EDIT: I didn't want to put my 2 cents in about what it actually is because I think someone else like Sinister could actually answer you much much better, but he does have a thread somewhere about it...
     
  11. devante

    devante Silver Belt

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    I just curious as he trained alot of the alpha male guys..so curious about the differences...trainers may teach similar arts..but they have different points of emphasis..etc
     
  12. Steve08

    Steve08 American Fedor Belt

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    Angles all basically relate to the center-line and one fighter's efforts to place himself in a position where he is facing his opponent's center, but the opposite is not true. When both fighters are squared up on the center-line, they are in a 50/50 position where nobody has an advantage. However, if a fighter's head/body is between your shoulders or "inside" our chest (inside angle) or outside your lead shoulder (outside angle) he is much harder to hit, and more importantly, you must readjust your own stance or distance before being able to hit him.

    In truth, a superior angle is simply a position in which you can easily attack your opponent but the opposite is not true. This has been alluded to by many, even Sun Tzu who spoke of attacking from a position of superiority (such as, for example, using bowmen to shoot down on a cadre of soldiers passing through a steep incline). They are not easy to find, because most opponents will not simply let you move off to one-side, but it is pretty common to get them if you are circling a whole lot (like TJ was) and your opponent swings at you out of frustration-- the fact that you are already moving will probably carry you inside or outside of his strikes, and it is here where you have a temporary moment to land free strikes.

    Here's a gif displaying some of these ideas, from Mirko Cro Cop's second fight with Wanderlei Silva:

    [​IMG]

    Observe how Cro Cop's footwork carries him outside of Wand's right hand, leaving him in prime position to nail Wand with his left straight, which if you notice actually travels almost directly over Wanderlei's right shoulder. It is important to note, however, that Cro Cop's stinging mid kick and jab (thrown while side-stepping) are most likely what created the opportunity for him to take the angle; this is a much different prospect from simply attempting to circle outside of the opponent at all times, when this does nothing but make your intentions painfully obvious.
     
  13. Fire of Youth

    Fire of Youth Green Belt

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    Someone created a really good thread explaining the benefits of angles using simple diagrams. It was made relatively recently but I could not find it quickly. Perhaps someone else remembers it? or who created it? Basically, all your answers are colalted in that one thread.

    If some one finds it, perhaps Sinister can add it to the instructional threads.
     
  14. Steve08

    Steve08 American Fedor Belt

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    You're probably thinking of a guy's thread -

    http://forums.sherdog.com/forums/f11/basic-study-angles-good-footwork-gif-heavy-2484375/
     
  15. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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    The biggest thing I was impressed by from Dillashaw in the fight was his defense. He was ready to block and scoop every round kick, circle away from every spin, angle off from the punches and look composed the entire time. His effective offense was really pretty simple--mostly working his jab from southpaw then stepping outside with "soft" left hands, or throwing a rear left kick off that punch. But his defense was extremely sharp and Barao couldn't find openings to exploit.

    Another thing about him was how well he positioned himself on the retreat. If he got backed up, he would pivot and get himself back in stance, ready to fire back immediately. It was really sharp to watch, and Barao couldn't swarm him because he was always threatening and had already forced Barao to respect him with that right hand in the first round.

    Anyway, I think Sinister nailed it. His fighters are getting better at everything. More specifically, I think he's making them better at what they already do. He gave Faber more advanced set ups and uses for what would otherwise be a disgustingly predictable right hand. He gave Benavidez better feints and the ability to threaten with his hips more effectively. He gave Dillashaw everything from measuring range before power shots to taking angles, flowing between grappling and striking, feinting, etc.
     
  16. Fire of Youth

    Fire of Youth Green Belt

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  17. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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    There's a lot of theory behind angles, but you don't really need to understand it all--especially if you're a fighter. Basically an angle is when you're lined up to hit the other guy, he isn't lined up to hit you (not as hard or as easily, he'll still always be able to hit you). It's about where both fighters' feet are. Angles are kind of like making your opponent stand in a shitty stance, either too square (inside angle) or too bladed (outside angle).

    The most important thing about angles is you don't try to take big ones. Angles are about subtlety and minimalist movements. If you take a huge side step and pivot, your opponent is usually gonna just do the same and nothing changes. For an example of this, watch the footwork in Aldo vs Lamas. Lamas is trying so hard to circle around Aldo, Aldo just keeps making small adjustments and keeps him in front of him. Rumble vs Davis was the same thing. Davis literally tries to run to angles and it gets him nowhere. If you make it more subtle, you can be ready to attack again quicker so you can either catch him as he over-adjusts, or maybe even move farther than he notices so he lets you have the angle. Angles can be used when defending to eliminate the opponent's ability to simply swarm or chase you or when attacking to give you a better position to hit from.

    Some examples: Jab/double jab as you take a half-step left and pivot, throw the right straight inside their lead shoulder. Probably the most common one.

    Slip outside a jab, pivot as you throw your cross, attack from his left side. If you do this against a southpaw left straight, it's a very potent shot.

    Your opponent tries to rush straight at you, pivot clockwise and set your feet. He's now square. This one is often attempted with a check hook.

    Your opponent throws a right kick, you step back and let it miss, you now have an angle.

    Angles exist naturally in a lot of situations too. Fighters will make footwork mistakes and give up angles so you don't have to take them. For example, a lot of fighters will miss a right hand then drag their right foot forward and give up an inside angle.

    Again, there's a lot of reasoning behind why angles are so effective and important but a lot of it is only necessary if you plan on coaching or really need to be able to think something through to learn it. If you just get that you want your feet lined up in a good stance while the opponent's aren't, you're good.
     
  18. Fire of Youth

    Fire of Youth Green Belt

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  19. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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  20. Nuclearlandmine

    Nuclearlandmine Shreddin' Double Yellow Card

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    You guys now Team Alpha Male is parting way with Duane right?
    Back to mediocrity and Master Thong for them >_>
     

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