Drysdale vs Bravo style Rubber Guard

Guys were using rubber guard in Brazil 20 years ago. Bravo just made it a "system" and named the movements and packaged them with bad music.

Names? People may have been playing high guard and going for omoplatas for ages, but that's far different from what is now considered modern day rubber guard.
 
I like Drysdale's take on the rubber guard because it takes a more realistic approach to getting into rubber guard imo.

Bravo's whole breakdown to rubber guard to rubber guard subs and variations is great in theory but it's going to be tough to actually catch someone in it you know?

Drysdale teaches the rubber guard the way most things in BJJ are taught, as something to use if/when the position shows itself. Bravo tries to force opponents into rubber guard, Drysdale's philosophy is to let his opponents fall into rubber guard, rather than try to force them into it.

People saying things like that show that they've not actually used RG. "Letting an opponent fall into that" basically means the they have bad posture and are giving you a free overhook, omoplata or triangle. Rubber guard 101 is to not put your hand on the mat. Drysdale's DVD assumes that it will be, and doesn't even talk about techniques to get it there if the guy is defending.

So what you're basically saying is he's taking a more realistic approach because most guys who go into your guard will suck and have no idea what they're doing?

No, Drysdale's style is not just "different". It's less high percentage, and he misses details that make rubber guard work against good players.
 
It doesn't matter what Drysdale resume is when it comes to teaching.
But then again I would prefer to see all those 500 million details of Eddie's RG, work against top competition.
 
It's very interesting to hear people's take on all different sorts of guards. I'm starting to see from all the threads that guard fighting is starting to undergo its own "MMA evolution", where one can train the "best pieces" of each guard system and incorporate it into a streamlined "mixed guard" system that works for them.

Personally, I feel that with such a wealth of information out there to absorb, one would be a fool to totally shun out merit from one specific system due to the politics. I've found that every guard system has its merits and functionality - each tool can perform well in certain situations. Look at it this way - if you study a "hated system"'s offensive game and become semi-proficient at it, you will become THAT much better at the defense against it since you will have a much better idea of what is coming at you.

To the poster above whom I quoted, great anecdote! Keep on training!

Thank you! :) I appreciate the insightful nature of your post. I agree wholeheartedly. Literally after attending the Pan Ams in NY this past weekend I witnessed what you mentioned before. It seems that there is a guard-evolution happening as we speak and it is really cool to see the variety of techniques available for one's taking. For instance, I felt that the inverted guard alliance NYC's Bass used to win his purple belt division was really different and very effective. He frustrated all of his opponents and won matches using this guard profusely. Now I am going to look into it and incorporate parts of the inverted guard into my ground game.
 
I like Drysdale's take on the rubber guard because it takes a more realistic approach to getting into rubber guard imo.

Bravo's whole breakdown to rubber guard to rubber guard subs and variations is great in theory but it's going to be tough to actually catch someone in it you know?

Drysdale teaches the rubber guard the way most things in BJJ are taught, as something to use if/when the position shows itself. Bravo tries to force opponents into rubber guard, Drysdale's philosophy is to let his opponents fall into rubber guard, rather than try to force them into it.

Drysdale also teaches you how to force people into Rubber Guard. He actually teaches 2 techniques to do so and mentions clearly that without attaining this position first, (opponent's head close to your abdomen or chest), you can't work your rubber guard. Both techniques are actually very helpful. I will give you another example why both are worth studying in detail to further one's game. Bravo teaches that after one clears the neck and grabs the calf on the opposite hand, he would attempt to bring the other foot up and interlock his feet while still holding the calf. From that point, Bravo suggest first trying the "Invisible Collar". Let's say for instance you used the left leg left to establish Mission Control and therefore needed to use the right hand to hook the calf once you cleared the neck. By bringing the right leg up and interlooking your feet, the pressure on the neck created by the forearm and the squeezing of the interlocked legs while falling towards my right is enought to cause many opponents to tap, which I have used successfully, again, because many people don't expect to get choked from that position.

On the other hand, Drysdale uses a similar position but a different approach for a really cool choke or set up for a triangle. In this case, I want you to visualize again Mission Control with the left leg while holding your ankle with your right hand on the left side of the head opponent who is on top of you. Drysdale then teaches that while moving quickly, bring the LEFT hand underneath and across the neck until you reach the same spot you were just previously holding with the right hand. This movement creates a lot of pressure on the opponent's neck already, from there there are 2 options: You can bring the right hand over the left and grab your shin (over hook) on the right side of the opponent's neck and go for a choke. It is really cool because the surprise factor can make it work. The second option is instead of bringing the right arm over the opponent's head, you simply control the opponent's left wrist and use it to pass your leg over the shoulder to get a triangle choke. However, you never remove the left hand from your left ankle. This adds very powerful pressure to the triangle and I found it that when I have been successful using it, opponents tap sooner than with the triangle choke alone. Both of them beautiful techniques.
 
But you ALWAYS need to force the person into the rubber guard. Tsukinokage is right. Only sloppy technique from your opponent is going to make him "fall" into your rubber guard. Eddie likes to hug the head or get underhooks while on closed or open guard and bring the opponent down. Drysdale teaches you when the opponent is on your close guard with his hands controlling your hips or abdomen, to with one motion thrust the opponent's elbows (not the wrists) out. This will cause him to lose his arm control. At the same time, use your legs to bring him towards your chest. I found this forcing to be extremely effective.
 
According to Eddie Bravo, there are a lot of holes in rubber guard instructional disc that Drysdale put out. I don't have the article but he made a very long post about it. Like most Brazilians, Drysdale has a problem with Eddie, mainly because they misunderstand him when he makes the claim to his own system of jiu jitsu.

In any case, IMO Drysdale's Rubber guard stuff is mainly to fill a disc in a set. The guy never uses this stuff in competition, or not that I've seen effectively.


Eddie Bravo's set are a vastly more complete look on the rubber guard system.



might be because drysdale is at the top of the world in terms of grappling and eddie is only on top of the rubber gard world
 
grdstorm11 View Post
According to Eddie Bravo, there are a lot of holes in rubber guard instructional disc that Drysdale put out. I don't have the article but he made a very long post about it. Like most Brazilians, Drysdale has a problem with Eddie, mainly because they misunderstand him when he makes the claim to his own system of jiu jitsu.

In any case, IMO Drysdale's Rubber guard stuff is mainly to fill a disc in a set. The guy never uses this stuff in competition, or not that I've seen effectively.


Eddie Bravo's set are a vastly more complete look on the rubber guard system.

this is what i don't understand, why does ewddie feel the need to write an article about someone else's instructional ripping it? Does gordo write articles ripping other people's half guard instructional? Does De La Riva? Does Roletta?
 
rubber guard is just that just another guard. just like every guard people are going to have their on take on it. i don't see one as better than the other. for me rubber guard is just not that effective when used against someone with strong basics that have a little understanding of the rg.
 
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